11 Tennessee Walking Horse

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Equi.Linn Sports Bra Amsterdam - Equi.Linn Sports Bra - Equi.Linn sports Lingerie - For the Rider Horses-store.com11 Tennessee Walking Horse

ASC-118 Written by Craig H.

Wood and Stephen G.

Jackson Revised by Kristen M.

Janicki Horse Judging Manual Table of Contents Using This Manual ……………………………………………………………………. 3 What Does It Mean to ‘Judge’ a Horse? …………………………………. 3 Developing Life Skills ………………………………………………………………. 3 Characteristics of a Successful Judge……………………………………. 3 The Basics Before Judging………………………………………………………. 3 The Five Key Characteristics to Judging Conformation in Horses ……………………………………………………….. 5 Balance ………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Structure and Travel …………………………………………………………. 6 Muscle……………………………………………………………………………….10 Quality ………………………………………………………………………………10 Breed and Sex Characteristics ……………………………………….11 Breed Specific Considerations for Judging Conformation Classes ………………………………………………………….11 Quarter Horse, Paint Horse, Appaloosa, and Other Stock Types …………………………………………………11 Hunter in Hand ………………………………………………………………..11 Arabian ……………………………………………………………………………..11 Morgan ……………………………………………………………………………..11 American Saddlebred …………………………………………………….11 Tennessee Walking Horse ………………………………………………12 Draft Horse ……………………………………………………………………….12 Miniature Horse ……………………………………………………………….12 Specific Considerations for Judging Performance Classes …………………………………………………………….12 Western Pleasure …………………………………………………………….12 Reining ……………………………………………………………………………..13 Western Riding ………………………………………………………………..14 Horsemanship/Equitation ……………………………………………..15 English Pleasure ………………………………………………………………16 Plantation Pleasure …………………………………………………………16 Hunter Under Saddle ……………………………………………………..16 Hunter Hack ……………………………………………………………………..17 Pleasure Driving ………………………………………………………………17 Taking Notes on a Class………………………………………………………….17 Overview…………………………………………………………………………..17 Writing and Presenting Oral Reasons ………………………………….17 Overview…………………………………………………………………………..17 Major Criteria for Reasons ……………………………………………..18 Suggested Terms for Comparing Conformation ………………..18 General Appearance ……………………………………………………….18 Balance ……………………………………………………………………………..18 Head and Neck ………………………………………………………………..18 Structure …………………………………………………………………………..19 Travel …………………………………………………………………………………19 Muscling……………………………………………………………………………19 Quality, Breed, and Sex Character ………………………………..19 Suggested Terms to Describe Faults in Conformation………19 General Appearance ……………………………………………………….19 Balance ……………………………………………………………………………..19 Head and Neck ………………………………………………………………..19 Structure …………………………………………………………………………..19 Travel …………………………………………………………………………………20 Muscling……………………………………………………………………………20 Quality, Breed, and Sex Character ………………………………..20 Suggested Terms to Describe Pleasure Horses…………………..20 Suggested Terms Used to Fault a Pleasure Horse ………………20 Suggested Terms to Describe a Reining Horse …………………..21 Suggested Terms Used to Fault a Reining Horse ……………….21 Suggested Terms Used to Describe Western Riding ………….21 Suggested Terms Used to Fault Western Riding ………………..22 Suggested Terms Used to Describe Hunter Hack ………………22 Suggested Terms to Fault Hunter Hack ……………………………….22 Suggested Terms Used to Describe Horsemanship/Equitation …………………………………………………..22 Suggested Terms Used to Fault Horsemanship/Equitation …………………………………………………..23 Suggested Terms Used to Describe Pleasure Driving ……….23 Connective Terms ……………………………………………………………………23 Grants………………………………………………………………………………..23 Connective Terms ……………………………………………………………23 Action Words ……………………………………………………………………23 Opening Pairs …………………………………………………………………..23 Conducting a Horse Judging Contest………………………………….23 Facilities …………………………………………………………………………….24 Horses ……………………………………………………………………………….24 Personnel ………………………………………………………………………….24 Tabulation and Recording ……………………………………………..25 The Danish Ribbon System ……………………………………………25 Using This Manual The suggestions, drawings, and lists of terms used in this manual are intended to serve as a guide for developing a 4-H, FFA, or collegiate horse judging team.

Because certain breed types change frequently, this guide in no way tries to establish an ideal for each breed of horse.

Instead, it lists terms that can be used to describe any individual, no matter the type or style prescribed by a specific breed organization.

The parts of the horse, structural diagrams, and list of unsoundnesses provided are primarily the same for all breeds.

The suggestions and recommendations for judging are universal rules that have withstood the test of time and should remain unchanged. What Does It Mean to ‘Judge’ a Horse? According to Webster’s New World dictionary, the word “judge” means “to form an opinion or estimation of after careful consideration.” When you judge a horse—whether in a show, on an individual basis, or in a contest—you form an opinion or estimation about that horse.

However, in order to form a valid opinion, you must have the following basic skills: • Be familiar with the horse. • Know the criteria used to judge horses. • Be able to recognize conformational faults.

With these skills at hand, you are on your way to a successful judging experience! • Reasoning power that takes into account practical considerations. • The ability to reach a definite decision based on sound judgment. • Extreme honesty and sincerity to avoid bias or prejudice.

Decisions should always be based on knowledge and judgment. • Steady nerves and confidence in your ability to make close, independent decisions based entirely on the animals’ merits.

Students in practice and in contests should always work independently.

A good philosophy for all judging is to do the best work possible at the time and to have no regrets about the results or accomplishments.

Every contest is a chance to learn and grow in your skills. • The ability to evaluate and rank the individual animal according to its appearance on the day of judging, regardless of its rank at a previous show. • Sound knowledge acquired through practice and experience to give effective reasons for decisions. • A pleasant and even temperament.

Good judges, however, do not fraternize with exhibitors or friends along the ringside. • Firmness to stand by and defend your placings without being offensive or in any way implying that your decisions are infallible. Developing Life Skills Continuous learning throughout life is important to character development.

Judging horses allows you to: • Learn more about the horse. • Learn how to evaluate and select a horse for a suitable purpose. • Learn to make choices and form opinions. • Learn to have confidence in your horsemanship skills. • Learn to defend your ideas and take other ideas into consideration. The Basics Before Judging Before you begin judging, it is important that you know the basics of horse anatomy.

Figure 1 on Page 4 shows the common parts of a horse from nose to tail.

Practice identifying those parts.

Being able to describe common coat colors and markings is also important when judging horses.

Here is a list of descriptions commonly used in the horse industry to identify colors and markings: • Black—uniform black color on the body, mane, and tail. • Bay—black mane and tail, black points (black hairs below the knees and hocks, black muzzle, and black tips on the ears), and a reddish body.

The color of the body may vary from a light to dark reddish color. • Seal brown—brown hairs located in the flank areas, on the muzzle, under the eyes, and on the tips of the ears.

The body is usually brown or black. • Chestnut or sorrel—skin is black or brown with red hairs.

Mane and tail are usually the same color as the body. • White—pure white hairs with pink skin and blue eyes. • Cremello—off-white or cream-colored body and blue eyes.

May have lighter manes and tails. • Perlino—off-white or pearl white body color with light rust-colored mane and tail. 3 — Morgan The Morgan generally stands between 14.1 and 15.2 hands tall and is noted for its stamina, vigor, personality, and eagerness to work.

The head shows alertness with a straight or slightly dished face, large wide-set eyes, and small ears.

The Morgan possesses a large, prominent jaw that blends into a narrow muzzle with large nostrils and firm lips.

The throatlatch is slightly deeper than other breeds, yet should be refined enough to allow proper flexion at the poll and normal respiration.

The head is carried high on a powerful, slightly crested neck.

The neck comes out of deep, powerful, well-angulated shoulders.

The shoulders blend into a short back, with broad loins and a muscular, well-developed, level croup.

Viewed from the side, the topline represents a gentle curve from the poll to the back, giving the impression that the neck sits on top of the withers rather than in front of them.

The tail should be attached high and carried with an arch to it.

The Morgan’s legs are straight and sound, with short cannons, flat bones, medium pasterns, and overall strength and refinement. American Saddlebred The head of a Saddlebred may be longer than that of many breeds but should exhibit refinement and sharpness of features.

The well-shaped head is carried relatively high, with small, alert, pointed ears set close, large eyes set well apart, a fine muzzle with large nostrils, and a straight face line.

The neck should be long and well-arched, with a clean throatlatch, and it may tie low into the chest with a more vertical appearance.

The Saddlebred has high withers, with a long, sloping shoulder and a short, level back.

The ribs are well-sprung, allowing for maximum function.

The croup is level with a well-carried tail coming out high.

Legs are straight, with broad, flat bones, sharply defined tendons, sloping pasterns, and good, sound hooves. 11 Hunter in Hand The overall appearance of a hunter horse makes it look taller, leaner, and more angular, with the body longer, deeper chested, and narrower as compared to other breeds.

The head tapers from large, wide-set eyes to a firm muzzle.

It is small with a straight, flat face and large, thin nostrils.

The ears should be wide set, small, and well formed.

The neck should be lean, without coarseness or heavy appearance; length and a slight arch that join smoothly into the shoulder are also desirable.

The shoulder should be long, well sloped, and covered with lean, flat, powerful Tennessee Walking Horse The Walking Horse should have an intelligent and neat head, well-shaped and pointed ears, clear and alert eyes, and a tapered muzzle.

The horse may be thicker through the throatlatch, and the neck should tie deep into the chest with a vertical appearance.

The shoulders should be muscular and sloping into a short, strong back, with good coupling at the loins.

The croup is generally more sloping (or steep) than in other breeds due to the Walking Horse’s stride.

The breed’s natural overstride makes it desirable to have some set to the hocks so that the horse appears slightly sickle hocked from the side and toed out from the rear. Specific Considerations for Judging Performance Classes Performance classes are designed to show a horse’s suitability for certain types of work.

Many of the performance classes incorporate particular tasks or routines common to the horse’s everyday use.

Pleasure, driving, cutting, jumping, and trail classes are examples of performance classes.

There are two types of performance classes to judge: those based on the rider and those based on the horse.

Those judged on the rider are called horsemanship or equitation classes, depending on whether Western or English tack is required.

Most of the other types are judged on the performance of the horse.

Most horse judging contests will declare all appointments legal in the performance classes.

Therefore, contestants will need to be concerned only with the performance of the horse or rider.

However, youth are encouraged to refer to the specific breed association rule books for more specifics about required and optional appointments and class routines.

Since the format of most of the classes calls for all horses to work simultaneously on the rail, each horse should be evaluated during each segment of the class routine.

This is vital to achieve a comparative evaluation.

Contestants should plan to have an initial placing by the time the class begins to work the second way of the ring.

The following performance classes are most commonly included in horse judging contests and will be discussed here: Western Pleasure, Reining, Western Riding, Horsemanship/Equitation, English Pleasure, Plantation Pleasure, Hunter Under Saddle, Hunter Hack, and Pleasure Driving.

Note: The pleasure classes represent judging on the horse’s performance, in that the mount demonstrates its ability to be a pleasure to ride.

The routine for each pleasure class requires the horse to walk, trot or jog, and canter or lope both ways of the ring, as well as to back.

The pleasure horse should respond readily on command, to be smooth in its transitions, remain consistent and true within each gait, and take the proper leads at the appropriate location.

It should maintain the proper head set and neck carriage, move squarely down the rail and, overall, clearly demonstrate that it is easy to handle and a pleasure to ride. Draft Horse All draft-type horses are characterized by their massiveness.

Power, rather than speed, is desirable.

In order to possess this power, the draft horse should be block or compact, low set or short-legged, and sufficiently heavy to enable him to pull.

The head should be shapely and clean-cut.

The chest should be especially deep and of ample width.

The topline should include a short, strong back and loin, with a long, nicely turned, and well-muscled croup and a well-set tail.

Muscling should be heavy throughout, especially in the forearm and gaskin.

The shoulder should be sloping.

The legs should be straight, true, and squarely set, and the bone should be strong, flat, and show plenty of quality. Miniature Horse The general impression of the ideal miniature horse should be one of symmetry, strength, agility, and alertness.

Preferences in judging are given to smaller horses when all other characteristics are considered equal.

The miniature horse must not measure more than 34 inches at the withers.

The head should be in proportion to length of neck and body, with a broad forehead and large, prominent eyes set wide apart.

The distance between the eyes and the muzzle should be comparatively short and end in a clean, refined muzzle with large nostrils, and the teeth should meet in an even bite.

The profile of the head should be straight or slightly dished below the eyes.

The ears should be medium in size, with slightly curved, pointed tips, and carried alertly.

A desirable neck is long and flexible in proportion to body and type and blends smoothly into the withers.

The shoulder should be long, sloping, and well angulated, allowing a free, swinging stride and alert head/neck carriage.

The body is balanced and well proportioned, with ample bone, muscle, and substance.

The topline appears smooth and generally level, with the back and loin short in relation to the underline.

The miniature has a deep girth and flank, with a trim barrel.

The hindquarters should be long, with well-muscled hips, thighs, and gaskins.

Tail set is neither excessively high nor low but smoothly rounds off the rump. Western Pleasure The Western Pleasure class is shown at a walk, jog, and lope in both directions of the ring.

Horses are required to back easily and stand readily.

A good pleasure horse has a stride of reasonable length in keeping with its conformation.

Ideally, such horses should have a balanced, flowing motion while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence.

The quality of movement and the consistency of the gaits are major considerations.

The horse should carry its head and neck in a relaxed, natural position, with the poll level with or slightly above the level of the withers.

It should not carry its head behind the vertical, 12

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