All breeds compete together in performance classes

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Equestrian Concierge Shampoo Horses-store.com All breeds compete together in performance classes

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. or Buckskin Registry and American Quarter Horse Association must show in the American Quarter Horse halter classes).

Halter classes will be judged separately by breed as designated by Mississippi 4-H Horse Clubs, Inc.

All breeds compete together in performance classes.

For determining age of horses for all classes, the classification will be computed by the calendar year, starting on January 1 of the year foaled.

A horse is a weanling during the calendar year in which it is foaled and a yearling during the first year following its foaling date.

For example, a horse foaled any time during 2011 is considered a yearling on January 1, 2012, and a 2-year-old on January 1, 2013.

An exhibitor may enter only one horse per class in Conformation or In-Hand (Halter) classes.

Also, an exhibitor may enter only one horse per class in performance classes.

The only exception is Team Roping, when an exhibitor may enter Team Roping twice – only one time as a header and only one time as a heeler (can be different teams) and may ride the same or a different horse as a heeler.

A horse owned jointly by two or more 4-H members of the same family may be entered in one performance class by one owner and in another class by the other owner.

No horse is allowed to enter the same type performance class twice (junior or senior).

For example: One joint owner may ride the horse in pole bending and the other owner may ride the same horse in barrel racing, but they cannot both ride the same horse in the pole bending or barrel racing class.

The only exception is if a jointly-owned horse is being shown in an introductory class.

For example, one sibling may ride a horse in Western Walk/Jog and another sibling may ride the same horse in Western Pleasure.

The same horse and exhibitor must show at the state show that showed in the district show.

Exhibitors must personally show their individual horses in district and state shows (no exceptions).

Official judges’ decisions are final and cannot be protested under any circumstances.

Show management has the right to make clerical corrections to placings within 30 minutes after the end of the show each day.

The rules committee will rule on situations not covered in this handbook or questions regarding conduct of the show, and their decisions will be final.

Rules and regulations in this handbook are intended to establish uniform policies and procedures for District and State 4-H Horse Shows in Mississippi.

The equipment judge or rules committee will pass on the qualifications of exhibitors and exhibits.

The judge and equipment judge may consult with each other regarding any possible illegal equipment and/or attire.

The judge, show management, or rules committee will have the authority to rule out or dismiss any horse that is considered improperly trained to be safely controlled.

The judge may disqualify any contestant for excessive use of a whip, rope, crop, bat, or reins anywhere on the horse.

Exhibitor or exhibitor’s parents, guardian, leader, or agent must display good sportsmanship, including humane treatment of horses on the premises, and are expected to honor the 4-H Code of Conduct at all times.

Any discourtesy toward Mississippi 4-H Horse Show officials, other exhibitors, parents, guardians, leaders, agents, or spectators may result in forfeiture of awards and/or dismissal from the show.

Violations may resujlt in 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. — 6.

Extending the trot or natural gait may also be asked.

The extended trot may be ridden with the rider either posting or standing in the stirrups to the front of the saddle.

Holding the saddle horn is permissible, at this gait, as might be done in open terrain. 7.

No additional credit will be given for unnecessary/additional maneuvers (such as sidepassing to and from an obstacle). 8.

The judge may ask a rider to move on to the next obstacle if the horse/rider is unable to complete the maneuver in a reasonable time or if the judge deems that the rider is, or will be, in an unsafe situation.

The judge may also ask the rider to move on after a third refusal at an obstacle.

A.

A rider will lose 15 points if an obstacle is attempted and not completed.

B.

The maximum points a rider can lose on any one attempted obstacle is 15 points. 9.

A rider may elect to skip an obstacle without disqualification.

He/she may do so with the judge assigning a 20 point penalty. 10.

Scoring will be on the basis of 0-infinity, with 70 denoting an average performance.

Each obstacle will receive an obstacle score that should be added or subtracted from 70 and is subject to a penalty that should be subtracted.

Each obstacle will be scored on the following basis, ranging from plus 1½ to minus 1½: -1 ½ extremely poor -1 very poor -½ needs improvement 0 correct +½ good +1 very good +1 ½ excellent Obstacle scores are to be determined and assessed independently of penalty points.

Penalties should be assessed per occurrence as follows: One-half point • Each tick of log, pole, cone, plant, or any component of the obstacle.

One point • Each bite of or hit of or stepping on a log, cone, plant, or any component of the obstacle. • Incorrect or break of gait at walk or jog for two strides or less. • Both front or hind feet in a single-strided slot or space at a walk or jog. • Skipping over or failing to step into required space.

With the nature of the uneven/random spacing of some stepovers, if the horse can navigate the obstacle cleanly without stepping into every little space, that is fine (ie, not every space in a step-over is a “required” space). • Split pole in lope over. • Incorrect number of strides, if specified. • Each step, up to three steps, moved during ground tie or picking up hooves.

Three points • Incorrect or break of gait at walk or jog for more than 2 strides. • Out of lead or break of gait at lope (except when correcting an incorrect lead). • Knocking down an elevated pole, cone, barrel, plant, obstacle, or severely disturbing an obstacle. • Stepping outside the confines of, falling, or jumping off or out of obstacle, with designated boundaries, with one foot. Five points • Dropping slicker, log rope, or object required to be carried on course. • Dropping lariat anywhere on course other than after completion of roping obstacle. • Each refusal, balk, or evading an obstacle by shying or backing. • Letting go of gate. • Use of either hand to instill fear or praise. • Stepping outside the confines of, falling, or jumping off or out of obstacle, with designated boundaries, with more than one foot. • Blatant disobedience (including kicking out, bucking, rearing, striking). • Moving more than 3 steps during ground tie or picking up hooves. (Note: “Holding the saddle with either hand” is a 5-point penalty in Western Trail but is not a penalty in Ranch Trail.) One to five points Faults, which occur on the line of travel between obstacles, are scored according to severity: • Head carried too high • Head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers) • Over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical • Excessive nosing out • Opening mouth excessively Fifteen points • Use of two hands (except for junior horses shown with hackamore or snaffle bit) or changing hands on reins.

But it is permissible to change hands to work an obstacle. • Excessively or repeatedly touching the horse on the neck to lower the head. • Failure to ever demonstrate correct gait between obstacles as designated. • Failure to complete an obstacle once attempted. • Maximum number of points that can be lost on any one attempted obstacle.

Twenty points • No attempt to work an obstacle.

Disqualified (zero score) • Use of romal other than as allowed in Contest Rules, Regulations, and Procedures. • Performing the obstacle incorrectly or other than in specified order. • Equipment failure that delays completion of pattern. • Entering or exiting an obstacle from the incorrect side or direction. • Working obstacle the incorrect direction. • Riding outside designated boundary marker of the arena or course area. • Significant deviation from correct line of travel between obstacles. 11.

Six to ten obstacles will be used.

Three will be mandatory, and the remaining will be selected from the optional list.

A.

Mandatory Obstacles: 1) Opening, passing through, and closing a gate. 2) Log drag – Horse must be willing to drag a log for a short distance in a straight line.

Rider to pick up rope while mounted at point A, and drop rope at point B.

Rope may not be tied hard and fast to the saddle horn; dallying is optional.

Log size should be roughly the size of a small fence post, suggested maximum 53 weight ~30 lbs.

Rope should be securely attached to one end of the post by either drilling a hole through the post and tying a bowline (or other non-slip knot), or attaching an O-ring and tying a non-slip knot through the ring. 3) Stationary steer – This obstacle is used to show the willingness of the horse to have a rope thrown from its back.

The judge will give credit to the horse that stands quietly while the contestant makes the swing and throw at the stationary steer.

Shying from the rope will be penalized, but missing the stationary steer will not be penalized.

Rider must provide the rope for this obstacle; rope may be carried in hand, over saddle horn, or affixed to saddle.

At the completion of this obstacle, contestant may coil rope and keep for remainder of class, or drop rope at obstacle without penalty.

B.

Optional Obstacles: 1) Mailbox – Rider will open and close a mailbox when mounted. 2) Bridge – Horse should walk willingly over a stationary bridge. 3) Slicker – The rider shall show the ability to handle the horse while simulating putting on a slicker.

The rider may also be asked to carry the slicker from point A to point B. 4) Walk-over log-L obstacle – Walk over 90° log “L”.

Log should be no less than 6” and no more than 12” in diameter.

Riders should negotiate this obstacle in a straight line. 5) Step-overs at a walk, trot, or lope – Natural branches, logs, fence posts, etc., which are laid out in seemingly random angles and distances.

Distances should be measured only so the set-up is repeatable, but not for uniform spacing or stride length.

Obstacles may not be raised and the maximum height of any stepover is 8”. 6) Water hazard – The horse should enter and exit the water hazard in a quiet manner. 7) Back through obstacle – Straight, “L”, or into/out of a marked location. 8) Sidepass – Straight, one direction, may or may not be elevated. 9) Ground tie – Rider must be able to dismount and walk a minimum of 5 paces away with the horse in a designated spot.

If used, this must be the last obstacle of the course (no remount) and class must be held in an enclosed arena.

If a rider is using a one-piece rein (romal, roping rein, etc.), it should be unsnapped from the bit on one side while ground-tying. 10) Pick up front feet – The rider must be able to dismount and pick up both front feet in an easy, time efficient manner.

If used, this must be the last obstacle of the course (no remount).

May be used in succession with ground tie so rider only dismounts once per course. 11) Any other safe and negotiable obstacle that could reasonably be found in everyday ranch work and meets the approval of the judge.

C.

If disrupted, the course shall be reset.

In the case that an obstacle is used in combination, the obstacle cannot be reset until the contestant finishes the entire combination. Awards for State Show Riffey Parker Memorial Award—presented to the individual who wins first place in Western Pleasure Junior 12–13.

Swazye Woodruff Memorial All-Around Award—presented to the individual (junior or senior) who competes in nonriding contests at district or state competition and accumulates the highest number of points in the state 4-H horse show. (See full details in later section.) County Educational Display Award—presented to the county that has the most outstanding educational display. (See full details in later section.) Roland (Pee Wee) Stacy Memorial Awards—presented to the overallhigh individual (junior and senior) member.

Dr.

Edward North Memorial Awards—presented to the horses (one owned by a junior and one by a senior member) that score the most points. (Points scored on a one rider, one horse basis.) H.B.

Hedgepeth Memorial Award—presented to the county that accumulates the most points.

High-Point Awards for Division Winners—champion high-point horse (junior or senior) will be awarded in the following divisions: Saddle and Gaited division, sponsored by Mississippi Walking Horse Association Western division (Andre´ Hopkins Memorial Award), sponsored by Mary Hopkins Speed division, sponsored by Charlie Estess Hunter division, sponsored by Sandy Slocum Cattle and Goat Events division, sponsored by Keith and Amy Ware Breakdown of classes for high-point awards will be as follows: Western Classes: 1-18, 25-28, 43-48, 50-51, 54-55, 57-58 Saddle and Gaited Classes: 19-20, 29-39 Hunter Classes: 61-64, 66-67, 70-72, 74-75 Pony Classes: 21-24, 40, 60 Speed Events Classes: 78-81, 84-87, 90-93 Pony Speed Events Classes: 76-77, 82-83, 88-89 Cattle and Goat Division Classes: 94-98, 102-103 NOTE: All Walk/Jog, Walk/Trot, Miniature In Hand, Cross Rails, Introductory, Special Needs, and Team classes do not count toward high point awards.

These include classes 41-42, 49, 52-53, 56, 59, 65, 68-69, 73, and 99-101.

Classes 104-105 will count toward a horse’s and youth’s high point totals.

In the case of a tie, high-point awards will be determined by counting the total number of horses beaten in all classes.

If a tie still exists, most points earned in the greatest number of classes will be used to determine high-point awards.

Remaining ties will be broken by determining the most points earned in performance classes.

If there are still ties after these methods, the remaining tied horses will be declared cochampions.

Award points in all classes based on the following: The maximum number of horses placed in each class will be 12.

Points will be awarded based on the number of horses placed.

For example: In a Western Pleasure class, assume there are 32 horses shown.

Twelve horses will be placed (1st through 12th); the 1st-place horse will receive 12 points, and the 12th-place horse will receive 1 point.

If three horses are in a performance class, three horses are placed, and the top horse receives three points.

The same procedure applies to halter classes.

The number of horses in a class will be determined by the number actually shown.

Horses brought 54 into the ring will constitute an entry and will be counted; however, a disqualified contestant will not receive points.

Halter and Performance Classes The champion and reserve champion halter horses will receive two points and one point, respectively, more than any other horse in that breed and sex.

For example: If the champion quarter horse gelding comes from a class that has three other horses, he will receive two more points than any other halter winner in the quarter horse geldings.

So, in a class with 12 quarter horse geldings, the champion gelding will receive 14 points.

The reserve champion will receive one point more as outlined.

Trophies will be presented for the first three places in each class.

The grand champion will receive a trophy, and the reserve grand champion will be presented a rosette. Qualifying Horses for Regional Show Mississippi can qualify 50 horses for the regional 4-H horse show.

Extension 4-H youth agents have the qualifying system and rules and classes that are eligible.

Exhibitors with horses qualifying on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday must pay the regional entry fee within 30 minutes of the last qualifying class each day or forfeit the right to go to the regional show.

At the conclusion of the show each night, a list of high-point horses will be made that will include juniors and seniors for all regional qualifying classes held that particular day.

This list will be used to fill any vacancies for the Southern Regional 4-H Horse Show that were not filled from the show that particular day.

At the conclusion of the show on Saturday night, a list of high-point horses that includes juniors and seniors for all regional qualifying classes during the State 4-H Horse Championships will be made.

This list will be used to fill any vacancies for the Southern Regional 4-H Horse Show that were not filled from the shows on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

To fill open slots for the next level of competition (state to regional) from the high-point list, there must be a responsible party at the signup area with an immediate “yes” or “no” response.

An exhibitor, parent, grandparent, legal guardian, or Extension agent must be present and prepared to pay entry fees when high-point horses are announced.

Ties for high point horse regional qualifying slots and for filling open slots with high point horses from each day or at the end of the show will be broken in this order: the exhibitor who (1) beats the greatest number of horses in all qualifying classes on a single horse; (2) earned the most points on a single horse in the greatest number of qualifying classes; or (3) earned the most points in performance classes on a single horse. Rules and Regulations 1.

All stalls and aisles within each county’s stall area will be judged on cleanliness. 2.

All decorations must be confined to this designated stall.

Signs are permitted on the outside of this stall to identify the county, and all items used in the decoration/display must stay within the confines of the horse stall (ie, no items above the height of the horse stall). 3.

Stall decorations CANNOT include electronics or devices that require electricity to function.

Use of nails, liquid nails (or other adhesives), or any other product that causes damage to the stall is prohibited.

No painting or discoloration of the stall is allowed.

If such damage occurs, the county will be responsible for all expenses to repair the stall and will be automatically disqualified from this contest. 4.

No items used to decorate the stall shall be permitted in the alley or walkway of the barn (ie, chairs, tables, stands, or other objects that take up part of the walkway of each aisle of stalls).

All stall decoration/display items must be kept inside the confines of the designated stall for the contest. 5.

Stalls must be decorated for judging by 12 noon on Thursday, June 27, and must remain on display until 12 noon on Saturday, June 29.

Aisles will be judged for cleanliness during this time, as well. 6.

Points will be as follows: a) 20 points: creativity/originality Educational subject matter pertaining to the equine persuasion, creative design of display, supporting materials, etc.

B) 40 points: educational value/context of display Clarity of message conveys 4-H message, etc.

C) 20 points: attractiveness of display Attracts attention, eye appeal d) 20 points: presentation and cleanliness of display/decorations General appearance, organization, workmanship, easily understood, cleanliness of stall area, etc.

E) Total possible points: 100 7.

The top three placing counties will receive plaques awarded the last day of the show. Horse Educational Contests All horse educational contest rules and regulations for Horse Bowl, Horse Individual and Team Demonstrations, Horse Public Speaking, Horse Judging, and Hippology will follow the contest rules of the 2014 Western National 4-H Roundup found at www.westernnationalroundup.org.

The rules that follow were printed in March 2013, so check www.westernnationalroundup.org for any rule changes made for horse educational contests since then. County Stall Decoration/Display Contest Objectives The objective of the Stall Decoration/Display Contest is to provide 4-H’ers enrolled in the equine projects with an opportunity to display educational information related to the 4-H horse project.

The decorations and displays should be exciting and challenging to construct and should be designed so that the 4-H’er can share accomplishments, ideas, requirements, and/or results of special studies in his or her projects.

Counties must enter the County Stall Decoration/Display Contest by Friday, June 7, 2013.

Send an email to Elwanda Shook at EShook@ads.msstate.edu to enter this contest. — Horse Public Speaking Contest Senior entries must be postmarked by Friday, June 7, 2013.

Send the completed Form 166 to Animal and Dairy Science Department, Attn: Elwanda Shook, Box 9815, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

Eligibility Rules 1.

This is an individual contest. 2.

Counties are invited to enter as many contestants as deemed necessary. 3.

Participants may be selected by any procedure that a county deems appropriate. 4.

Contestants must be enrolled in 4-H in the county they represent. 5.

Senior contests will be held during the State 4-H Horse Show (see pages 6–8 for specific date and time).

This contest is for senior 4-H’ers (14–18 years old). 6.

Junior contests will be held during the District 4-H Horse Show.

The date and time will be announced at the district show.

This contest is for junior 4-H’ers (8–13 years old).

The top three individuals from each district will advance to the state contest.

Contest Rules 1.

The subject matter must pertain to the horse industry.

Speeches not appropriately related to the horse industry can be disqualified at the discretion of the judge(s). 2.

No visual aids may be used, including the use of handouts such as bibliographies and pamphlets.

Contestants will be disqualified for using any visual aid, including handouts, before, during, or after the speech. 3.

Contestants may use notes.

However, excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant.

This will be at the discretion of the judges. 4.

A public address system will not be used, but a podium may be provided. 5.

During the competition, the contestants may introduce themselves by name, county, and speech topic. 6.

Senior speeches should be 7–10 minutes in length.

Each judge will deduct one point from the total score for each minute or fraction of a minute under 7 minutes or over 10 minutes.

After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak. 7.

Junior speeches should be 3–5 minutes in length.

Each judge will deduct one point from the total score for each minute or fraction of a minute under 3 minutes or over 5 minutes.

After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak. 8.

Contestants should cite their major reference materials at the end of the competition.

This time will not be counted in the allotted time. 9.

Only the judge(s) may ask questions of the contestant.

Question time will not be counted in the allotted time.

The contestant should repeat the question before answering it. 10.

Contestant order will be determined by a random drawing and announced prior to the contest. 11.

Ties will be broken by: first, the judges’ accumulated delivery score; second, the judges’ accumulated organization score; and third, content and accuracy scores. 12.

For educational purposes, the management may video tape all speeches with individual consent. 13.

Judges will consider the questions listed under each section.

Points on the score card will be as follows: INTRODUCTION …………………………………………………….10 points 1.

Did the introduction create interest in the subject? 2.

Was the introduction short and to the point? ORGANIZATION ……………………………………………………..15 points 1.

Were the main points easy to follow? 2.

Were the main points arranged in the best order? 3.

Were sentences short and easy to understand? 4.

Was the speech interesting? CONTENT AND ACCURACY ………………………………………20 points 1.

Were the facts and information accurate? 2.

Was there enough information concerning the subject? 3.

Was credit given to sources of information, if appropriate? 4.

Was content appropriately related to the horse industry? STAGE PRESENCE ………………………………………………….15 points 1.

Was the speaker neat and appropriately dressed? 2.

Was the speaker friendly? 3.

Did the speaker talk directly to the audience? 4.

Did the speaker look at the audience? 5.

Was the speaker’s posture erect but not stiff? 6.

Did the speaker refrain from leaning on the podium? 7.

Did the speaker seem relaxed and at ease? DELIVERY ……………………………………………………………..20 points 1.

Did the speaker have appropriate voice control? 2.

Were all words pronounced correctly? 3.

Did the speaker’s facial expressions reflect the mood of the speech? 4.

If notes were used, did this detract from the speech? 5.

Did the speaker seem to choose words at the time they were spoken? (Avoid a delivery that seems read or memorized.) GENERAL ………………………………………………………………10 points 1.

Did the speaker convey to the audience a sense of wanting to communicate? 2.

Did the speech reflect the thoughts and personality of the speaker? CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………10 points 1.

Was the conclusion short and interesting? 2.

Did the conclusion properly wrap up the speech? 3.

Could the speaker handle questions easily? Horse Judging Senior entries must be postmarked by Friday, June 7, 2013.

Send the completed Form 166 to Animal and Dairy Science Department, Attn: Elwanda Shook, Box 9815, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

Junior Horse Judging Competition The junior contest will be held at the district horse shows.

The date and time will be announced at the district show.

The top three junior teams and the top three individuals (even if the individual is not a member of one of the top three teams) from each district contest will be eligible to compete at the state 4-H horse championships in the junior division.

Senior Horse Judging Competition The senior contest will be held during the State 4-H Horse Championships (see pages 6–8 for date and time). 61 Contest Rules 1.

A team may have three or four members; when four are entered, the three highest overall scores will make up the team totals. 2.

All contestants will report to the contest site where they will receive full instructions and be given placing cards.

All contestants will remain with the assigned group throughout the contest. 3.

While the contest is in progress, there will be no conferring between the contestants and anyone else except as directed by the contest superintendents or their representatives. 4.

No cell phones or other mobile electronic devices will be permitted in the judging contest or reasons contest areas. 5.

Contestants are responsible for their own writing instruments and notepads for the purpose of taking notes for reasons classes. 7.

Three to five halter classes will be judged, and contestants will give oral reasons on two to three of the classes. 8.

Three to five performance classes will be judged, and contestants will give oral reasons on two to three of the classes.

These performance classes will be selected from Western Pleasure, Reining, Western Riding, Showmanship, Hunter Under Saddle, Horsemanship, Hunt Seat Equitation, and Hunter Hack. 9.

Juniors who compete in the state horse judging contest will judge two halter classes and two performance classes and give oral reasons on one halter and one performance class. 10.

The animals and showmen will be designated by numbers 1–4 and numbered from left to right as viewed from the rear. 11.

Horses will not be handled by the contestants, but time will be provided in halter classes for close inspection and to observe the horses at a walk and trot. Hippology Contest Seniors Only Entries must be postmarked by Friday, June 7, 2013.

Send the completed Form 166 to Animal and Dairy Science Department, Attn: Elwanda Shook, Box 9815, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

The senior contest will be held during the State 4-H Horse Championships (see pages 6–8 for date and time).

Objectives The primary objective of the Hippology Contest is to provide a friendly but competitive opportunity for youth enrolled in 4-H to demonstrate the breadth of their knowledge and understanding of equine science and management, particularly the practical application of this knowledge and skill.

Hopefully, this contest will generate new friendships and be a rewarding experience for the contestants.

Rules and Regulations Contestants and Eligibility 1.

Counties are invited to enter only one team for the 2013 contest.

Teams consist of three or four members.

In four-member teams, all will compete, but the member receiving the lowest overall score will be automatically declared the alternate.

The scores of the alternate will not be included in any of the team totals but will be considered in making all individual awards.

Teams consisting of three members will have no alternate, and all members’ scores will count in determining individual and team awards. 2.

Teams may be selected by any means deemed appropriate by the county they represent and must be certified as eligible by the county 4-H leader. 3.

Contestants must have been at least 14, but not over 19, years of age by January 1 of the current year. 4.

Contestants must be enrolled in 4-H during the current year in the county they are representing. 5.

Reference material: All the information covered in this contest may be found in one or more of the following publications: • EQUUS Magazine, glossary only, from 7/12–6/13 • Evans The Horse (Second Edition) by Evans, Borton, Hintz, and Van Vleck W.H.

Freeman and Company 660 Market St.

San Francisco, CA 94104 (415) 391-5870 • Lewis Feeding and Care of the Horse (Second Edition) by Lon, Lewis, Williams, and Wilkins 351 West Camden St.

Baltimore, MD 21201-2436 (800) 638-0672 • HIH Horse Industry Handbooks (First Edition plus added inserts) by American Youth Horse Council (junior and senior reference) PRIMEDIA Equine Attention: AYHC 103 Pow Wow River Rd.

East Kingston, NH 03827 (800) 952-5813 www.theequinecollection.com • YLM Youth Leaders Manual by American Youth Horse Council (senior reference) PRIMEDIA Equine Attention: AYHC 103 Pow Wow River Rd.

East Kingston, NH 03827 (800) 952-5813 www.theequinecollection.com • Equus EQUUS Illustrated Handbook of Equine Anatomy, EQUUS Illustrated Handbook Vol. 2 www.horsebooketc.com • State Line Tack catalog • Grains, forages, and feed preparations used in the contest will be representative of feeds used in horse rations. • Parker Equine Science (Fourth edition) by Rick Parker; ISBN-13: 9781111138776; Published January 2012 The Contest Examination phase (approximately 200 points) This phase of the contest will include 1.

A written exam 2.

Projected slides to be identified according to breed, color, color pattern, activity, proper appointments, etc. 3.

Anatomy, which may include external, skeletal, internal organs, parts of the gastrointestinal tract, male and female reproductive organs, detailed anatomy of the foot, and detailed anatomy of the lower limbs 62 Station phase (approximately 200 points) This phase will consist of a series of stations or tables where contestants will respond to the requirements of each station.

Members will be allowed 2 minutes at each station.

The following are examples of stations that may be used: 1.

Identification of a) Various types of saddles (actual or pictured) and parts of saddles b) Tack, bits, bridles, horseshoes, and parts of shoes; tools and equipment, and assembly of specific parts of various pieces of equipment; grains and forages used in equine rations, including various forms or methods of preparation c) Internal and external parasites based on actual samples, pictures, life cycles, charts, and/or damage caused d) Blemishes and examples of unsoundness e) Ages of equines based on teeth 2.

Use of pulse rate, respiration rate, temperature, dehydration, anemia, etc., to assess horse health 3.

Measurements such as, but not limited to, wither height, shoe size, girth, collar size, gullet width, seat length of saddle, etc., may be required Judging phase (approximately 200 points) Contestants will be required to place at least four classes, made up of two conformation and two performance classes.

Every effort will be made to use the same horses that are being used in the judging contest, with placing to be simultaneous with contestants in the judging contest, with the same official placing and cuts that apply to the judging contest.

In extreme emergency, pictorial, video, and/or movie classes may be used, in which case they would be especially prepared for the event.

Team problems (approximately 200 points) All teams will be presented with the same problem(s).

Each team will have equal time to discuss the problem before presenting an oral solution or series of suggested procedures related to the problem.

Each member of each team is encouraged to contribute to the oral presentation.

A bonus score will be given to teams that have complete team participation in the oral presentation.

Evaluation will be based on the team’s understanding of the problem and the soundness of the logic used in making the oral response.

The official may ask questions of any or all of the team members to clarify the presentation.

Examples of possible team problems might include the following: 1.

Balancing a horse’s ration 2.

Farm management recommendations for specific horse operations (such as breeding, training, boarding, nursery, lay-up, etc.) 3.

Considerations for the establishment of a new horse facility (stable to be used for a specific purpose) 4.

Recommendations for selecting, locating, and purchasing horses for specific uses 5.

Behavior problems (causes, management of, and corrections) 6.

Training and conditioning programs (equipment, schedules, methods, nutrition, and problem avoidance) 7.

Breeding and/or leasing contracts (specific clauses for insurance, liability, payments, care, termination, transport, etc.) 8.

Teaching lessons in horse management (specific subject to be announced) to a group of 9- to 11-year-old beginner 4-H’ers: where, how long, how much information, hands-on experiences, reinforcement, testing, and evaluation 9.

Explanation of use and assembly of specific equipment 10.

Demonstrating skill or ability to use specific equipment Team problem scores will not be included in determining the rank of individuals in the contest but will be added to the team scores of the other three phases to determine the overall team standing.

Awards 1.

Awards will be presented to the top three individuals in the examination phase, in the station phase, in the judging phase, and overall. 2.

Each member of the top three teams in the examination phase, in the station phase, in the judging phase, in the team problem phase, and overall will receive awards.

Tie Breaking All ties—overall, individual, and team—will be broken using the following sequence: 1.

Examination scores 2.

Station scores 3.

Judging scores Ties within any phase are to be broken using the overall score first and then the same sequence as above.

If further tie-breaking is needed, the scores at each station, in the above order, may be used. Horse Art Contest Objectives To encourage 4-H members enrolled in the horse project to expand in an area that is rapidly growing as a career and offering opportunities for many 4-H members; to encourage 4-H members who do not have a horse but are interested in horses and related activities.

Categories NOTE: Multiple entries in a single category by an individual 4-H’er will subject all entries in that category to disqualification. 1.

Pastels/Charcoal/Graphite/Colored Pencil (Abstract or Realistic).

Artwork done in pastel, charcoal, graphite, colored pencil, or a combination of these media.

Must include an image of a horse or, for abstract, your rendition of a horse.

MUST BE PROTECTED TO PREVENT SMEARING. 2.

Oil/Acrylic/Watercolor (Abstract or Realistic).

Artwork done in oil, acrylic, or watercolor.

Must include an image of a horse or, for abstract, your rendition of a horse.

MUST BE DRY. 3.

Pen/Ink/Markers/Crayon (Abstract or Realistic).

Artwork done in pen/ink, marker, crayon, or a combination of these media.

Must include an image of a horse or, for abstract, your rendition of a horse.

MUST BE PROTECTED TO PREVENT SMEARING. 4.

Cartoon (Single Frame or Strip).

Artwork done in any medium.

Must include an image of a horse and tell a short story or make a point. 5.

Sculpture/3-D (Abstract or Realistic).

No larger than 2 feet by 2 feet.

Artwork done in any 3-D medium.

MUST BE DRY when entered.

Must be your rendition of a horse. 6.

Mixed, Altered Media, Other. (Artwork combining several types of media and that doesn’t fit other categories—collage, paper, paint, fun foam, felt, metal, combined mediums, altered horse items, etc.) No larger than 2 feet by 2 feet.

Must include an image of a horse.

MUST BE DRY when entered.

Read more about All breeds compete together in performance classes:

Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra

Other Sources:

  • Saddle – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Horses for Sale | HorseClicks
  • Horses On Sale!
  • Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra, Learn more about Equestrian Concierge Shampoo Horses-store.com HERE:

    Horses-Store.com and  All breeds compete together in performance classes
    Horses-Store.com - All breeds compete together in performance classes
    Horses-Store.com and  All breeds compete together in performance classes
    Horses-Store.com - All breeds compete together in performance classes