Broken : 001 were broken in during February March in the Northern….

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Equi.Linn Hipster underpants Horses-store.comBroken : 001 were broken in during February March in the Northern….

These data suggest that two year olds that go shin sore do not produce as much McIII bone as unaffected horses.

In spite of increased OC, bone width and total BMC were reduced.

The reason for this difference is not apparent since the horses in the study were managed similarly. 1.

Buckingham S.H.W.

And L.B Jeffcott. 1990.

Aust.

Equine Vet., 8: 148-153. 2.

Norwood, G.L. 1978.

In Proc. 24th Ann.

Conv.

Am.

Assoc.

Equine Pract., 24: 319-336. 41 Proc.

Aust.

Equine Sc.

Symp., Vol 2, 2008 A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY OF TRAINING PRACTICE OF 2-YEAR-OLD HORSES IN THE NORTH ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND L.J.

Russell, C.F.

Bolwell, C.W.

Rogers and E.C.

Firth Massey Equine, Institute of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand The aim of this study was to describe the typical structure of 2-year old race training programme in the North Island of New Zealand.

Data were collected with a cross sectional survey of 56 racehorse trainers in the Manawatu/Wanganui region (Central Districts; n=16) and the South Auckland/Waikato region (Northern Districts; n=40) of New Zealand.

The trainers provided information on the origin of 2-year olds, breaking-in process, early education, the general training structure.

Trainers in the Northern Districts had more 2-year olds in work, and a higher proportion of them (27% vs 19%) were aimed at a 2-year old race start, whereas in the Central Districts a higher proportion of 2-year olds (18% vs 6%) were kept for 3-year old races (p<0.001).

Significantly more horses (p<0.001) were broken in during February-March in the Northern Districts 53 % vs 39 % than in Central Districts.

Trainers in the Northern Districts were more likely to send their horses away to be broken in (p<0.001) and brought their horses straight into work after having been being broken in (p=0.018).

As stable size decreased, the proportion of horses aimed at races decreased (33% vs. 21% vs. 17%) and the proportion of 2year olds for sale increased (15% vs. 27% vs. 37%) for large (average of ≥ 40 horses in work), medium (20-39), and (moderate (≤ 19 in work) respectively (p<0.001).

Trainers in medium sized stables had a greater proportion of horses (65%) broken-in during the months of February and March compared to those in large (46%) and moderate (39%) sized stables (p<0.001), respectively.

Forty eight percent of trainers keep some form of record of the training sessions and trainers in the Northern Districts were more likely to time the gallops (p=0.012).

Overall, the location of the trainer had a greater effect on training practises than number of horses in work.

Trainers in the Northern Districts had more horses ready for trialling and racing as 2-year olds, and earlier than those in the Central districts.

Economic factors may be driving smaller stables to train more horses for sale than for racing as two year olds. 42 Proc.

Aust.

Equine Sc.

Symp., Vol 2, 2008 TRAPPING AND DARTING FERAL HORSES IN REMOTE LOCATIONS FOR FOOT RESEARCH AND GPS ACTIVITY MONITORING.

B.

HampsonA and C.C.

PollittB A B Australian Brumby Research Unit School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland. Well over 300,000 feral horses occupy most of the habitat suitable for survival in Queensland and Northern territory.

Numbers decrease in times of drought but are thought to double every 4 years in normal seasons.

Feral horses are abundant in the rugged area of the Carnarvon Range of Central Queensland, Gulf area of Queensland and Northern Territory and the desert fringes of South West Queensland and Central Australia.

These areas consist of a variety of habitats with footing ranging from deep sandy flats to hard rocky mountains thus providing an ideal scenario for determining the effect of environment on the equine foot.

For the past 18 months we have both modified existing techniques and developed new ones to carry out goal oriented scientific investigations in these remote and challenging areas.

The techniques include trapping and darting feral horses to allow foot photography and measurements and attachment of GPS tracking collars to determine the range, grazing and watering patterns and activity levels of the animals.

Natural water holes provide the best locations for hide construction and darting operations.

After selecting a suitable hide location we build a viewing and working platform 3m above the ground at the entrance to the fenced water point.

A small confinement panel yard is constructed from steel panels below the hide with walk through access for horses and other animals using the water point.

Salt licks placed below the hide are helpful to slow stock movement through the yard.

A game camera is set up to unobtrusively monitor horse numbers and watering patterns.

When the structure is new the hide is abandoned to allow desensitisation of animals.

In earlier studies feral horses were darted from helicopters with etorphine hydrochloride (M99) with various combinations of xylazine, atropine sulphate and acepromazine with variable success.

M99 is still used extensively for wild life capture in Africa.

Our study horse are darted and released quickly with minimal disruption to behaviour and no disruption to the sociology of the family band.

We use intramuscular M99 which produces knock-down in 6 to 8 mins.

When darting from the hide, at a range of 3 to 5 m, we are able to confine the darted horse inside the yard while releasing other horses on to water using a pulley operated gate.

Following data collection and GPS collar fixing (3 to 4 minutes) the M99 is reversed using twice the dose of diprenorphine (M5050).

Within 60 seconds the horse is up and walking normally.

Horses appear unaware of the darting event and post-induction behaviour appears unaffected.

Our team has performed extensive GPS tracking of domestic horses and has commenced work tracking the movements of feral horses in their natural setting.

An example of a feral horse GPS track will be presented with some comparative data from the domestic horse studies.

We will be concentrating our efforts on the feral horse for the next 2 years.

Details of the full www.wildhorseresearch.com Brumby research project can be viewed at: 43 Proc.

Aust.

Equine Sc.

Symp., Vol 2, 2008

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