Broken : adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering….

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GIFT VOUCHER Horses-store.comBroken : adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering….

RANGE STATEMENT    smell taste touch. Risks associated with catching greyhounds may include:      bites gear breakage greyhound injury loose greyhound personal injury:  contracting diseases from greyhound  being knocked over by a loose or excited greyhound.

Adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering to responsibilities under national and state codes of practice; federal, state and territory legislation; and local government regulations covering animal welfare adhering to rules of training tracks and public venues complying with relevant road safety rules considering variables that influence behaviour of greyhounds, such as:  fences and equipment  lure  other persons or animals  vehicles  wind or noise contributing to development of risk control measures following safe operating procedures holding greyhounds for veterinary and other treatments identifying and reporting unsafe work practices identifying emergency situations practising walking greyhounds in confined environments reporting defective gear, including:  broken or exposed wire in muzzles  broken stitching  tears or cracks in leather Controlling risks associated with catching and controlling greyhounds includes:             Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 318 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSG201A Handle greyhounds — Gear for safely handling greyhounds will include: Public areas may include:         Safe leading, lifting and holding techniques to control greyhounds may include:           broken or loose rivets understanding individual greyhound behaviour using gear or equipment approved by the regulatory racing body wearing approved personal protective equipment.

Collar and slips leads muzzles.

Bridges and roads kennels paddocks or parks racecourses training tracks.

Being aware of surroundings and possible causes of distraction encouraging nervous greyhounds using voice, body language and patting ensuring collar fits and is tight enough maintaining appropriate lead tension and length on lead never leading more than the approved number of greyhounds at the same time preventing greyhound from getting too far ahead of handler by checking animal to ensure it stays by the handler’s side using own voice and body language to assert control or reassure the greyhound using leads of suitable length using safe lifting skills to avoid greyhound and personal injury using well-maintained and safe gear. Unit Sector(s) Unit Sector Greyhound racing code Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 319 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSG201A Handle greyhounds Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 Co-requisite units Co-requisite units — Hazards and obstacles may include:          Gear selected will include:   duration of exercise exercise venue instructions received by phone or email pace specific gear or equipment to be used.

Bull rings bush trails designated slow exercise areas at racecourses paddocks private roads at racecourses private tracks rules and regulations of exercise area.

Broken rails, fences or gates creeks and waterholes dusty or eroded tracks horses machinery rabbit holes slippery or muddy surfaces stray animals, including native animals vehicles.

Horse gear:  approved gear  bridles, including leather or plastic with snaffle bits or ring bits  breastplates  double clip leads  protective boots  reflector strips if exercised before light  rings or running martingales  saddles, including exercise pad or general purpose  saddlecloths and necessary packing rider gear:  approved Australian Standard helmet, clothing and footwear  reflector strips if riding before light.

Grooming requesting assistance from strapper for riding Horse is prepared for exercise by:   Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 542 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH206A Develop riding skills for flatwork Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT   — Gear and equipment maintenance may include:       Supplies will include:        reporting workplace hazards using safe handling and lifting methods using the right equipment.

Checking gear inventory cleaning gear inspecting stable equipment, including:  rakes  shovels  wheelbarrows recommending purchase of new gear or equipment removing and reporting broken or damaged gear or equipment sending gear or equipment for repair.

Bedding disinfectants feed and feed supplements gear and equipment grooming tools medications and associated veterinary items rugs. Unit Sector(s) Unit Sector Harness and thoroughbred racing codes Co-requisite units Co-requisite units Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 582 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH301A Implement stable operations Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 —         Horse is prepared for exercise by:  specific gear or equipment to be used.

Designated slow exercise areas at racecourses paddocks private roads at racecourses private tracks relevant rules of racing rules and regulations of exercise area.

Broken rails, fences or gates creeks and waterholes dusty or eroded tracks horses machinery rabbit holes slippery or muddy surfaces stray animals, including native animals vehicles.

Bits, for example:  snaffle  straight rubber boots, for example:  ankle (pastern)  bell boot  scalping  shin breastplate bridle crupper, for example:  standard  rubber dock  tail tie harness saddle standard overcheck or head check driver gear:  approved Australian Standard helmet, clothing and footwear sulky.

Fitting bridle comfortably to horse with reins secured until ready to attach to sulky Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 621 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH305A Develop driving skills for trackwork Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT     Safe zones will include:  —    Factors to consider with time counting and pace estimation include:     Rules for riding in company to be taken into account include:   maintaining safe zones when in company of other horses walking through gateway, racecourse or stable entrances and exits.

Checking carefully to make sure way is clear before proceeding keeping unnecessary noise to a minimum riding horses to ensure you meet oncoming horses near side to near side waiting until oncoming horses have passed before proceeding waiting for vehicles to pass before proceeding.

Long, slow distance work trotting, cantering and half pace working horses on nominated slow tracks on nominated slow days.

Ensuring horse does not overwork or underwork following instructions judging number of seconds per 200 metres or furlong strong canter to half pace.

Maintaining safe length and width space between horses track rules:  riding past horses  riding in the bull ring  passing slower horses  entering and leaving track  entering and leaving tie-ups  working in pairs  working with more than two other horses.

Broken reins or defective gear fallen horses or riders horse whipping around horse ducking out the gap horse going in reverse direction horse shying loose or out of control horses track hazards and variations in surface. Common trackwork situations may include:         Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 632 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH306A Develop basic trackwork riding skills Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 Unit Sector(s) Unit Sector Thoroughbred racing code —            Factors to consider when remedial training techniques are employed may include:    stimulus and response submissive behaviour.

Older horses requiring re-education young horses that have been broken in and are preparing for training.

Coping with change of pace from trot, canter and half pace during workouts maintaining safe width space and length between horses moving outside or inside other horses without altering action or baulking moving smoothly from slow canter to faster striding work remaining balanced and travelling on the bit rules and regulations of the track working past gaps without deviating working quietly with other horses or on its own working with confidence with other horses.

Condition of teeth individual horse behaviour, including:  bolting  climbing  head throwing  inattention to use of aids  opening mouth  shying  whipping around possible soreness, for example:  back  feet  hindquarters  limbs.

Barrier blankets bits blindfolds blinkers ear muffs nosebands pacifiers rings Gear required for remedial training may include:         Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 742 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH407A Educate thoroughbred horses for racing Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT   —      Pre and post-race procedures may include:      checking fit of gear cleaning gear, including:  cleaning and oiling leather  washing hardware  washing plastic, rubber and towelling  washing sulky recognising wear and breakage, including:  cracked leather  gear slippage  frayed girths and surcingles  perished elastic, rubber or plastic  rusted buckles  split or cracked points  worn padding  worn stitching recognising approved gear replacing worn or broken gear.

Assessing camber attending protests and inquiries checking for track obstacles or possible distractions complying with drug testing procedures discussing horse’s chances and likely race style Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 790 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH412A Prepare to drive horses in races Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT              Starting procedures will include: — approved personal protective equipment, including:  goggles  helmets  riding boots  silks  vests  whips business clothes saddlery, including:  breastplates  girths Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 819 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH415A Ride horses in races Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT girth sleeves  lead bag and leads  rings  saddles  surcingles  stirrup irons and leathers  towels and packing suitcase or travel bag.

Cleaning gear, including:  washing plastic, rubber and towelling  oiling leather recognising wear and breakage, including:  cracked leather  gear slippage  frayed girths and surcingles  perished elastic, rubber or plastic  rusted buckles  split or cracked points  worn padding  worn stitching recognising approved gear replacing worn or broken gear selecting appropriate saddles, girths and other gear to meet weight requirements.

Apprentice rides book clearances trainer’s correspondence.

Assessing camber evaluating track rating evaluating surface of turf and synthetic tracks observing rail position and condition observing length of straights observing distances between turns and straights.

Attending protests and inquiries claiming allowances complying with drug testing procedures following mounting yard procedures inspecting track   Race gear preparation and checking for safety may include:      Race meeting documentation may include: Track features and racecourse conditions may include:          —            Illnesses may include:     Reporting may include:     energy intake versus energy expenditure inappropriate methods of weight reduction medical requirement related to minimum weight for riders rules of racing sauna use scales weight gain and loss wasting.

Coaches agents nutritionists sports medicine providers sports psychologists sports scientists other appropriate personnel.

Broken bones bruising jarring concussion strains or sprains.

Acupuncture chiropractic exercise healing times hydrotherapy ice and heat laser physiotherapy rest sports massage ultrasound.

Colds or influenza infections tetanus viruses, including equine morbillivirus.

Employer or relevant trainer racing governing body race clubs state or territory health and safety authority Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 853 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRPSH419A Manage principles of sports science for jockeys Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT    time frames verbal reports written reports. Unit Sector(s) —   Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 1075 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRROP311A Perform duties of greyhound race starter Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RANGE STATEMENT fences and equipment  lure, wind and noise  other persons or animals  vehicles contributing to development of risk control measures following safe work practices following accident and injury procedures identifying and reporting unsafe work practices identifying race start hazards, including:  broken start equipment  gear breakage  injury to staff, attendant or greyhound  loose greyhound identifying emergency situations understanding individual greyhound behaviour wearing approved personal protective equipment.

Delayed race start greyhound turning in box injured greyhound loose greyhound faulty equipment or box operation.

Courteously and efficiently maintaining confidentiality and discretion promptly using correct forms of greeting via verbal and/or written communication, including:  describing actions  giving and receiving clear, accurate and simple messages  listening to and interpreting information and instructions written reports may include simple documents and notes.          Incidents may include:      Reports are provided to stewards:       — Page 1175 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRROP406A Perform duties of harness race starter Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 Range Statement RANGE STATEMENT The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole.

It allows for different work environments and situations that may affect performance.

Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.

Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation, needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.

Past problems with particular horses may include:  horse:  attempts to burrow  charges forward  pulls sideways  rears  is reluctant to move forward.

Arms or wings of mobile start battery communication system between starter and driver damage fuel height of arms lights oil power steering fluid transmission fluid tyre pressure water.

Ahead of advertised start time barrier positions for unruly horses defer or delay start horse denied fair start horse unfit non-starter order of placing at barrier starter’s orders starter’s powers.

Broken start equipment disruption at barrier gear breakage injury to staff, driver or horse Operation of mobile and other start equipment check will include:             Rules of racing in relation to race starts may include:          Hazards associated with start of the race may include:     Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 — Page 1185 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RGRROP407A Perform duties of thoroughbred race starter Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 Range Statement RANGE STATEMENT The range statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole.

It allows for different work environments and situations that may affect performance.

Bold italicised wording, if used in the performance criteria, is detailed below.

Essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment (depending on the work situation, needs of the candidate, accessibility of the item, and local industry and regional contexts) may also be included.

Past problems with particular horses during loading may include:  horse:  attempts to burrow under or climb gates  charges forward  pulls sideways  rears  is reluctant to move forward and requires barrier blanket.

Battery communication system between starter and driver damage electrical front and rear gates fuel lights power steering fluid tractor oil and water transmission fluid tyre pressure water.

Ahead of advertised start time barrier positions for unruly horses defer or delay start horse denied fair start horse unfit non-starter order of placing at barrier rider disobedience riderless on jumping starter’s orders starter’s powers.

Broken start equipment Operation of barriers and other start equipment check may include:             Rules of racing in relation to race starts may include:            Hazards associated with start of  Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 — What trees and shrubs may be relevant to this standard? Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 1915 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTC2012A Plant trees and shrubs Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 mechanised lifting devices.

What root treatments may be required prior Root treatment may include trimming to planting? diseased or damaged roots, cutting off lower section of root ball, separating bound roots, teasing out roots to fit planting hole, removing excess potting media, dips (fungicides, bacterial, hormone).

What post-planting treatments may be Post-planting treatments may include weed required to maintain plant health and quality? and disease control, mulching, fertilising, watering, pruning (formative pruning, removal of damaged or dead materials, canopy reduction, thinning, lifting), securing (tying, staking, bracing, anchoring, guying) and installation of tree guards and protective materials.

What waste material may be relevant to this Waste material may include unused work standard? material, plant debris, litter and broken components.

Plant-based material may be mulched or composted, plastic, metal, paper-based materials may be recycled, re-used, returned to the manufacturer or disposed of according to enterprise work procedures.

What records may be relevant to this standard? Records may include number and type of plants and materials used in the planting program, injury and dangerous occurrence reports, treatments and/or amendments applied, chemical use, date, problems encountered. For more information on contexts, environment and variables for training and assessment, refer to the Sector Booklet. Unit Sector(s) Not applicable. Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 1916 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTC2210A Maintain properties and structures Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RTC2210A Maintain properties and structures — Range of Variables The Range of Variables explains the range of contexts within which the performance and knowledge requirements of this standard may be assessed.

The scope of variables chosen in training and assessment may depend on the work situations available What OHS requirements may be relevant to this standard? Safe systems and procedures for: the safe operation and maintenance of vehicles Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 1937 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTC2306A Operate vehicles Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 checks to ensure loads are secure and within working specifications hazard and risk control manual handling including lifting and carrying the application of emergency/defensive driving techniques handling, application and storage of hazardous substances outdoor work including protection from solar radiation, dust and noise the appropriate use, maintenance and storage of personal protective equipment passengers only carried when there is a seat approved by the manufacturer.

What hazards may be associated with the operation of vehicles? Hazards may include exposure to loud noise and fumes, hazardous substances (fuel, oils), solar radiation and organic and other dusts.

It may also include ergonomic hazards associated with posture and mechanical vibration.

Other hazards may include bystanders, livestock and wildlife, difficult terrain and varying gradients, broken ground, potholes, ditches, gullies, embankments, obstacles, adverse weather conditions, electricity, overhead hazards including powerlines, loose clothing, speed and fatigue, load shifts, mechanical malfunctions, exposed moving parts including hydraulics, run over by vehicle, crushed by roll over, loads being carried, and other machinery.

This may include cabin drills, pre-start and safety checks including an assessment of tyres, wheels, controls and cables, lights, safety mirrors, electrics, safety restraints, chain/driveshaft, chassis and suspension.

Service and maintenance of cooling system, fuel, oils and lubricants, battery levels; tyre pressure, fan belts, leads, lines, connections, air filters, air conditioning, brakes, clutch, gearbox, steering, lighting and transmission.

This may include utilities, four wheel drive vehicles, motorcycles (2 and 4 wheel), and What routine checks and maintenance might be carried out prior to operation? What vehicles might be covered in this Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 1938 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTC2306A Operate vehicles Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 standard? What enterprise requirements may be applicable to this standard? — Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2090 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTE3601A Install irrigation systems Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 use of PPE including sun protection, safe operation of tools, equipment and machinery, safe handling, use and storage of chemicals and hazardous substances, correct manual handling, basic first aid, personal hygiene and reporting problems to supervisors.

How may a clean and safe work area be maintained? Tasks may include disabling unused tools, equipment and machinery and storing neatly out of the way of installation activities, safely storing materials on site, using signage and safety barriers during and removing after construction activities are completed, and swiftly and efficiently removing and processing debris and waste from the work area. What waste material may be relevant to this Waste material may include unused standard? construction and excavated materials, and plant debris, litter and broken components.

Plant-based material may be mulched or composted, plastic, metal, paper-based materials may be recycled, re-used, returned to the manufacturer or disposed of according to enterprise work procedures.

Waste may be removed to designated areas for recycling, reuse, return to the manufacturer or disposal.

What testing equipment may be relevant to this standard? Testing equipment may include pressure gauges and flow meters. For more information on contexts, environmental implications and variables for training and assessment, refer to the Sector Booklet. Unit Sector(s) Not applicable. Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2091 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTE3605A Troubleshoot irrigation systems Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 RTE3605A Troubleshoot irrigation systems — Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2168 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTF3027A Renovate sports turf Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 shovels, turf spades, rollers, wheelbarrows, hoses and hose fittings, and machinery such as trailed or motorised renovating equipment, scarifiers, de-thatchers, coring machines and core harvesters, mechanical rollers, front-end loaders, trucks, hydraulic trailers, and tractors and 3-point linkage equipment.

What OHS requirements may be relevant to OHS requirements may include identifying this standard? hazards; assessing risks and implementing controls; cleaning, maintaining and storing tools, equipment and machinery; appropriate use of personal protective equipment including sun protection; safe operation of tools, equipment and machinery; safe handling, use and storage of chemicals and hazardous substances; correct manual handling; basic first aid; personal hygiene, and reporting problems to supervisors.

What environmental implications may be associated with the renovation of sports turf surfaces? Turf renovation may have beneficial environmental impacts where excess water, nutrient and chemical flow from the existing turf surface into the external environment, including natural waterways, are reduced by the application of materials to assist with soil drainage or water holding capacity.

Detrimental environmental impacts may arise where renovation activities produce excess noise, dust or water run-off, or off-site ground water or soils are contaminated from solids, debris, nutrients, chemicals and water run-off.

How may a clean and safe work area be maintained? Tasks may include disabling unused tools, equipment and machinery and storing neatly out of the way of renovation activities; safely storing materials on site; using signage and safety barriers during and removing after renovation activities are completed; and swiftly and efficiently removing and processing debris and waste from the work area. What waste material may be relevant to this Waste material may include unused standard? renovation materials, and plant debris, litter and broken components.

Plant-based material may be mulched or Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2169 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia RTF3027A Renovate sports turf Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 composted, plastic, metal, paper-based materials may be recycled, re-used, returned to the manufacturer or disposed of according to enterprise work procedures.

Waste may be removed to designated areas for recycling, reuse, return to the manufacturer or disposal.

For more information on contexts, environmental implications and variables for training and assessment, refer to the Sector Booklet. Unit Sector(s) Not applicable. Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 — Driving may be carried out in typical road transport situations, including: Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2483 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia TLIC107C Drive vehicle Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 checking and topping up of fluid levels checks of tyre pressures checks of operation of vehicle lights and indicators checks of brakes Minor routine repairs may include: replacement of blown globes in vehicle lights replacement of broken fan belt replacement of blown fuse replacement of door mirrors repairs to rear tail-light lens changing of tyres repair of tyre punctures replacement of broken coolant hose Driving hazards may include (examples only): wet and iced roads oil on road animals and objects on road fire in vehicle leaking fuel faulty brakes parked vehicles on the road faulty steering mechanism on vehicle pedestrians crossing the road flooded sections of road windy sections of road foggy conditions Factors that can cause traffic delays and diversions may include (examples only): traffic accidents flooded sections of road road damage bridge/tunnel damage road works building construction emergency situations such as bushfires, building fires, etc. Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012 Page 2484 of 2493 AgriFood Skills Australia TLIC107C Drive vehicle Date this document was generated: 29 May 2012 road closures for special events such as marches, parades, etc.

Holiday traffic road closures for utility works such as electricity, water, sewerage, telecommunications, gas, etc.

Depending on the type of organisation concerned and the local terminology used, workplace procedures may include: company procedures enterprise procedures organisational procedures established procedures Documentation/records may include: state/territory driving licence requirements state/territory road rules workplace driving instructions and procedures vehicle manufacturers instructions, specifications and recommended driving procedures including pre-operational checks of vehicle emergency procedures vehicle log book or record book (where required) Applicable procedures and codes may include: relevant state/territory roads and traffic authority driving regulations and licence requirements pertaining to the class of vehicle relevant state/territory road rules relevant state/territory permit regulations and requirements relevant state/territory OH&S legislation relevant state/territory fatigue management regulations relevant state/territory environmental protection legislation Unit Sector(s) Not applicable. Approved © Commonwealth of Australia, 2012

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    Horses-Store.com - Broken : adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering….
    Horses-Store.com and Broken : adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering….
    Horses-Store.com - Broken : adhering to responsibilities under OHS legislation and workplace practices adhering….