Flexion : 7 Guide for Riders and Judges to be judged on….

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4 Year Old Horses the test to be ridden will be the current FEI Young Horse Test for 4 year olds horses must achieve at least a score of 6 (60%) In the Material Class to be eligible for the Consolation Final horses placed from 4th and below with a score of at least 6 (60%) in the Material Class are eligible for the Consolation Final to be judge by 2 accredited Young Horse judges sitting at C 5 and 6 Year Old Horses Horses that are not eligible to compete in the second round will be eligible to compete in the Consolation Final providing they have scored at least 6 (60%) in the first round.  tests to be ridden will be as follows:  5YO Current FEI Dressage Test for 5 year olds – Final  6YO Current FEI Dressage Test for 6 year olds – Final  to be judged by 2 accredited Young Horse judges sitting at C 5.5.2 5.6 Selection of Young Horses to Represent Australia Overseas The EA National Dressage Selectors will select the Australian representatives for the FEI World Breeding Championships for Young Dressage Horses based on merit and with reference to; any EA Selection Policy that may be in place, the below performance requirements, and the rules of the FEI/World Breeding Federation for Sport Horses.

In particular, horses must be registered with a stud book recognized by the WBFSH.

For Young Horses to be considered for endorsement to the World Young Horse Championships they must have a minimum of 2 performances of at least 7.5 with at least 7 for all paces.  For Australian based horses, one of these scores must be achieved in the final round of the Australian Young Horse Championships.  For Young Horses not domiciled in Australia, at least one performance must be from an official Young Horse qualifier.competition results including the judging sheets must be forwarded to the EA National Office as proof of performances. 5.7 Guide for Riders and Judges  to be judged on rideabilty, basic paces, general impression and suitability as a dressage horse  basic ideas which should be considered by the judges:  is the horse clearly demonstrating correct education according to the Training Scale?  does the horse demonstrate a desirable picture of a dressage horse?  fundamental criteria of paces, rideability and general impression as a dressage horse are evaluated as follows:  the steps and strides must be in a regular rhythm and free from tension  keeping in mind the training level of the horse, special emphasis should be placed on:  a smooth and steady contact  the willing acceptance of the bit  a submissive poll in the three basic paces and in the different tempi and the transitions  flexion and bending  the harmonious development on both reins  suppleness  desire to go forward  ability to engage the hindquarters  potential to collect  horses, which during the initial movements of the test, still show signs of tension and concentration lapses, or which may even be shying or unsettled, should be judged more benevolently than in a normal dressage competition  minor mistakes should not be given weight if, in principle, the horse is demonstrating good movements and is demonstrating the adoption by the trainer of desirable training technique  it is recommended that one of the judges provides a commentary after the completion of each horse‟s test in at least the 2nd round but preferably for both the 1st and 2nd round.

This commentary is mainly for the benefit of spectators and the main purpose thereof is to explain the rideability and strengths of the 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 42  individual horse in relation to the demands at each level of competition, the quality of the three basic paces, and the horse‟s ability to perform as a high-level dressage horse see FEI Dressage Handbook for further notes on the purpose of and judging of Young Horse competitions 5.8 Young Horse Tests All Young Horse tests and score sheets are available for download from the Equestrian Australia website – www.equestrian.org.au 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook — 7.10.2 Serpentine The serpentine with several loops touching the long side of the arena consists of half-circles connected by a straight line.

When crossing the centre line the horse should be parallel to the short side (a).

Depending on the size of the half- circles the straight connection varies in length.

Serpentines with one loop on the long side of the arena are executed with a 5m or 10m distance from the track (b).

Serpentines around the centre line are executed between the quarter lines (c). A) B) C) 7.10.3 Figure of Eight This figure consists of two voltes or circles of equal size as prescribed in the test, joined at the centre of the eight.

The athlete should make his horse straight an instant before changing direction at the centre of the figure. 7.11 Leg-Yielding  the aim of leg-yielding is to demonstrate the suppleness and lateral responsiveness of the horse.  the exercise is performed in working trot  the horse is almost straight, except for a slight flexion at the poll away from the direction in which it moves, so that the athlete is just able to see the eyebrow and nostril on the inside  the inside legs pass and cross in front of the outside legs  leg- yielding should be included in the training of the horse before it is ready for collected work.

Later on, together with the more advanced shoulder-in movement, it is the best means of making a horse supple, loose and unconstrained for the benefit of the freedom, elasticity and regularity of its paces and the harmony, lightness and ease of its movements.  leg-yielding can be performed “on the diagonal”, in which case the horse should be as nearly as possible parallel to the long sides of the arena, although the forehand should be slightly in advance of the hindquarters.

It can also be performed “along the wall”, in which case the horse should be at an 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 59 angle of about 35 degrees to the direction in which he is moving (see illustration 5). Leg yielding along the wall Leg yielding on the diagonal 7.12 The Lateral Movements the main aim of lateral movements (except leg-yielding) is to develop and increase the engagement of the hindquarters and thereby also the collection  in all lateral movements – shoulder-in, travers, renvers, half-pass – the horse is slightly bent and moves with the forehand and the quarters on different tracks  the bend or flexion must never be exaggerated so that it impairs the rhythm, the balance and fluency of the movement  in the lateral movements, the pace should remain free and regular, maintaining a constant impulsion, yet it must be supple, cadenced and balanced.

The impulsion is often lost because of the athlete‟s preoccupation with bending the horse and pushing it sideways  7.12.1 Shoulder-In The exercise is performed in collected trot.

The horse is ridden with a slight but uniform bend around the inside leg of the athlete maintaining engagement and cadence at a constant angle of approximately 30 degree s.

The horse‟s inside foreleg passes and crosses in front of the outside foreleg; the inside hind leg steps forward under the horse‟s body weight following the same track of the outside fore leg, with the lowering of the inside hip.

The horse is bent away from the direction from which it is moving (see illustration 1). 7.12.2 Travers The aim of the travers is to show a fluent collected trot movement on a straight line and a correct bend.

Front and hind legs are crossing, balance and cadence are maintained.

This exercise can be performed in collected trot or collected canter.

The horse is slightly bent around the inside leg of the athlete but with a greater degree of bend than in shoulder-in.

A constant angle of approximately 35 degrees should be shown (from the front and from behind one sees four tracks).

The forehand remains on the track and the quarters are moved inwards.

The horse‟s outside legs pass and cross in front of the inside legs.

The horse is bent in the direction in which he is moving.

To start the travers, the quarters must leave the track or, after a corner or circle, are not brought back onto the track.

At the end of the travers, the quarters are brought back on the track (without any counter-flexion of the poll/neck) as one would finish a circle (see illustration 2). 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 60 Shoulder in Travers 7.12.3 Renvers The aim of renvers is to show a fluent collected trot movement on a straight line with a greater degree of bend that in should-in.

Fore and hind legs cross, balance and cadence are maintained.

This is the inverse movement in relation to travers.

The hindquarters remain on the track while the forehand is moved inward.

To finish the renvers the forehand is aligned with the quarters on the track.

Otherwise, the same principles and conditions that apply to travers are applicable as at renvers (see illustration 3).

The horse is slightly bent around the leg of the athlete.

The horse‟s outside legs pass and cross in front of the inside legs.

The horse is bent in the direction in whilst it is moving. (see illustration 3). 7.12.4 Half-Pass The aim of half-pass in trot is to show a fluent collected trot movement on a diagonal line with a greater degree of bend than in shoulder-in.

Fore and hind legs cross, balance and cadence are maintained.

The aim of half-pass in canter is to both demonstrate and develop the collection and suppleness of the canter by moving fluently forwards and sideways without any loss of rhythm, balance or softness and submission to the bend.

This is a variation of travers, executed on a diagonal line instead of along the wall.

It can be performed in collected trot or collected canter.

The horse should be slightly bent in the direction in which it is moving and bent around the inside leg of the athlete.

The horse should maintain the same cadence throughout the whole movement.

In order to give more freedom and mobility to the shoulders, it is of great importance that the impulsion is maintained, especially the engagement of the inside hind leg.

The horse‟s body is nea rly parallel to the long side of the arena with the forehand slightly in advance of the hindquarters. Renvers Half-Pass 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 61 7.13 The Pirouette, the Half-Pirouette and Turn on the Haunches 7.13.1 Pirouette / Half-Pirouette Aim of the pirouette and half-pirouette in canter is to demonstrate the willingness of the horse to turn around the inside hind leg on a small radius, slightly bent in the direction of the turn while maintaining the activity and the clarity of the canter, the straightness and the balance before and after the figure and clear canter strides during the turn.

In the pirouette or half-pirouette in canter, the judges should be able to recognise a real canter stride although the feet of the diagonal – inside hind leg, outside front leg – are not touching the ground simultaneously.  the pirouette is a turn of 360 degrees/180 degrees executed on two tracks, with a radius equal to the length of the horse and the forehand moving round the haunches  pirouettes/half-pirouettes are usually carried out at collected walk or canter but can also be executed at piaffe  at the pirouette/half-pirouette the forefeet and outside hind foot move round the inside hind foot.

The inside hind leg describes a circle as small as possible  at whatever pace the pirouette/half-pirouette is executed, the horse, slightly bent in the direction in which he is turning, remaining “on the bit” with a light contact, turning smoothly around, maintaining sequence and timing of foot-falls of that pace.

The poll stays the highest point during the entire movement  during pirouettes/half-pirouettes the horse should maintain its activity (walk also included) and never move backwards or sideways  in executing the pirouette or the half-pirouette in canter, the athlete should maintain lightness of the horse while accentuating the collection.

The hindquarters are well engaged and lowered and show a good flexion of the joints.

An integral part of the movement is the canter strides before and after the pirouette.

The strides should show an increased activity and collection before the pirouette and the balance being maintained at the end of the pirouette  the quality of pirouettes/half-pirouettes is judged according to the  suppleness, lightness, cadence and regularity, and the precision and smoothness of the entrance and exit.

Pirouettes/half-pirouettes at canter should be executed in 6 to 8 strides (full pirouette) and 3 to 4 strides (half-pirouette). 7.13.2 Half-pirouette in Walk (180 degrees) The half-pirouettes in walk (180 degrees) are executed out of collected walk with the collection being maintained throughout the exercise.

When the horse exits the half-pirouette it returns to the initial track without crossing the hind legs. 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 62 7.13.3 Turn on the Haunches from Walk (180 degrees) For younger horses that are still not able to show collected walk the „turn on the haunches‟ is an exercise to prepare the horse for collection.

The “turn on the haunches” is executed out of medium walk prepared by half halts to shorten the steps a little to improve the ability to bend the joints of the hindquarters.

The horse does not halt before or after the turn.

The “turn on the haunches” can be executed on a larger radius ( approx. 0.5m) than the pirouette in walk, but the demands of the training scale concerning rhythm, contact, activity and straightness are the same. 7.13.4 Turn on the Haunches from Halt to Halt (180 degrees) To maintain the forward tendency of the movement, 1 or 2 forward steps at the beginning of the turn are permitted.

The same criteria apply as for the turn on the haunches from walk. 7.14 The Passage The aim of passage is to demonstrate the highest degree of collection, cadence and suppleness in the trot.  passage is a measured, very collected, elevated and cadenced trot.

It is characterised by a pronounced engagement of the hindquarters, a more accentuated flexion of the knees and hocks, and the graceful elasticity of the movement.

Each diagonal pair of feet is raised and returned to the ground alternately, with cadence and a prolonged suspension  in principle, the height of the toe of the raised foreleg should be level with the middle of the cannon bone of the other foreleg.

The toe of the raised hind leg should be slightly above the fetlock joint of the other hind leg  the neck should be raised and gracefully arched with the poll as the highest point and the nose line close to the vertical.

The horse should remain light, and soft “on the bit” without altering the cadence.

The impulsion remains lively and pronounced  irregular steps with the hind or front legs, swinging the forehand or the hindquarters from one side to the other as well as jerky movements of the forelegs or the hind legs or dragging the hind legs or double beat in the moment of suspension are serious faults The Piaffe The aim of piaffe is to demonstrate the highest degree of collection while giving the impression of remaining in place.  piaffe is a highly collected, cadenced, elevated diagonal movement giving the impression of remaining in place.

The horse‟s back is supple and elastic.

The hindquarters are lowered; the haunches with active hocks are well engaged, giving great freedom, lightness and mobility to the shoulders and forehand.

Each diagonal pair of legs is raised and returned to the ground alternately, with spring and an even cadence  in principle, the height of the toe of the raised foreleg should be level with the middle of the cannon bone of the other supporting foreleg.

The toe of the raised hind leg should reach just above the fetlock joint of the other supporting hind leg  the neck should be raised and gracefully arched, with the poll as the highest point.

The horse should remain “on the bit” with a supple poll, maintaining a contact.

The body of the horse should move in a supple, cadenced and harmonious movement  piaffe must always be animated by a lively impulsion and characterised by perfect balance.

While giving the impression of remaining in place there may be a visible inclination to advance, this being displayed by the horse‟s eager acceptance to move forward as soon as it is asked  moving even slightly backwards, irregular or jerky steps with the hind or front legs, no clear diagonal steps, crossing either the fore or hind legs or swinging either the forehand or the hindquarters from 63 7.15 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook one side to the other, getting wide behind or in front, moving too much forward or double-beat rhythm are all serious faults 7.16 The Impulsion/The Submission 7.16.1 Impulsion  impulsion is the term used to describe the transmission of an eager and energetic, yet controlled, propulsive energy generated from the hindquarters into the athletic movement of the horse.

Its ultimate expression can be shown only through the horse‟s soft and swinging back by gentle contact with the athlete‟s hand  speed, of itself, has little to do with impulsion; the result is more often a flattening of the paces.

A visible characteristic is a more pronounced articulation of the hind leg, in a continuous rather than staccato action.

The hock, as the hind foot leaves the ground, should first move forward rather than being pulled upwards, but certainly not backwards  a prime ingredient of impulsion is the time the horse spends in the air rather than on the ground.

Impulsion is, therefore, seen only in those paces that have a period of suspension  impulsion is a precondition for a good collection in trot and canter  if there is no impulsion, then there is nothing to collect 7.16.2 Submission  submission does not mean subordination, but an obedience revealing its presence by a constant attention, willingness and confidence in the whole behaviour of the horse as well as by the harmony, lightness and ease he is displaying in the execution of the different movements  the degree of submission is also demonstrated by the way the horse accepts the bit with light and soft contact and a supple poll.

Resistance to or evasion of the athlete‟s hand being either “above the bit” or “behind the bit” demonstrate lack of submission.

The main contact with the horse‟s mouth must be through the snaffle bit  putting out the tongue, keeping it above the bit or drawing it up altogether, as well as grinding the teeth or agitation of the tail, are mostly signs of nervousness, tension or resistance on the part of the horse and must be taken into account by the judges in their marks for the movement concerned as well as the collective mark for “submission”  the first thought when considering submission is willingness, that the horse understands what is being asked of it and is confident enough in the athlete to react to the aids without fear or tension  the horse‟s straightness, uphill tendency and balance enable it to stay in front of the athlete‟s legs and go forward into an accepting and self-carrying contact with the bit.

This is what really produces the picture of harmony and lightness  fulfilling the main requirements/movements of a Dressage test is the main criterion for submission 7.17 The Collection  the aim of the collection of the horse is to:  further develop and improve the balance and equilibrium of the horse, which has been more or less displaced by the additional weight of the athlete  develop and increase the horse‟s ability to lower and engage its hindquarters for the benefit of the lightness and mobility of its forehand  add to the “ease and carriage” of the horse and to make him more pleasurable to ride  collection is developed through the use of half-halts and the use of lateral movements shoulder-in, travers, renvers and half-pass  collection is improved and achieved by the use the seat and legs and containing hands to engage the hind legs.

The joints bend and are supple so that the hind legs can step forward under the horse‟s body  however, the hind legs should not be engaged too far forward under the horse, that they shorten the base of support excessively, thereby impeding the movement.

In such a case, the line of the back would be lengthened and raised too much, in relation to the supporting base of the legs, the stability would be impaired and the horse would have difficulty in finding a harmonious and correct balance  on the other hand, a horse with an over-long base of support, which is unable or unwilling to engage its hind legs forward under its body, will never achieve acceptable collection, characterised by “ease and carriage” as well as a l ively impulsion, originating from the activity of the hindquarters  the position of the head and neck of a horse at the collected paces is naturally dependent on the stage of training and, to some degree, on its conformation.

It is distinguished by the neck being raised without restraint, forming a harmonious curve from the withers to the poll, being the highest point, with the nose slightly in front of the vertical  2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 64   at the moment the athlete applies his aids to obtain a momentary and passing collecting effect, the head may become more or less vertical the arch of the neck is directly related to the degree of collection 7.18 — 11.12.2         11.13 Elimination and Penalties  Refer to Section 3 for information on riding the test and the various penalties for errors of course and other types of penalties including elimination 11.14 Callers and Video  callers should stand with their back to the wind  have a predetermined subtle signal if you need the movement to be re-called  you must not speak to your caller but the rules permit the repeating once only of the calling of a movement  calling with too loud a voice should be avoided  video from the centre line at A gives you the reverse of the judge‟s point of view  ensure any videoing is carried out at least 10 metres back from the arena 11.15 After the Competition Once the placings are posted for the test you rode you can pick up your test sheets.  check that there is a point in each box and perhaps check the adding up  if a protest is to be lodged it must be within 30 minutes of the posting of the placings  if you are unable to stay at the event venue to collect your test the organisers will send the test to you if you provide a stamped, self-addressed envelope  remember to thank the organisers before you leave the ground, it may encourage them to run another competition for you 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 97 Annex F – FEI Hyperflexion Guidelines Illustrated guidelines (May 12, 2010) have been produced by the FEI showing permitted positions of the horse’s head and neck during pre and post-competition training.

Long, deep and round: The diagrams were produced by an FEI Working Group as part of a new Annex (XIII) for the revised FEI Stewards Manual on warm-up techniques.

One of the key stipulations in the Working Group’s report was that all unacceptable training methods and techniques must be stopped immediately.

The Working Group was also insistent that abuse of the horse must be avoided and, in particular, stressing the horse, aggressive riding and inflicting pain and/or discomfort on the horse must be prevented. “The current FEI Stewards Manual already includes instructions covering aggressive riding, but the new Annex (XIII) has clear instructions on action to be taken if necessary relating to flexion of the horse’s neck during pre and post-competition training,” the FEI said.

Low, deep and round: “Any head and neck position obtained through the use of aggressive force is not acceptable.” Movements which involve having the horse’s head and neck carriage in a sustained or fixed position should be performed only for periods not exceeding about 10 minutes without change.

Deliberate extreme flexions of the neck involving either high, low or lateral head carriages, should be performed only for very short periods.

If these deliberate extreme flexions are performed for longer periods the Steward can intervene.

It is the Steward’s responsibility to ensure that riders respect these procedures. “Used in conjunction with the new Stewards Manual, these illustrations now provide the Stewards with the final piece in the jigsaw that will allow them to do their job more effectively, ensuring that horse welfare is maintained at all times”, Working Group Chair Frank Kemperman said.

The diagrams show examples of acceptable head and neck positions.

The illustrated FEI Stewards Manual Dressage has been sent to all National Federations, which have been instructed to immediately forward it to all stewards for implementation from May 15.

Dressage will be the first discipline to use the new Stewards Manual, with the other FEI disciplines currently reviewing their individual requirements.

The Guidelines, which were produced by the Working Group formed after the round-table conference held in Lausanne on 9 February 2010, were approved at the FEI Bureau meeting in Geneva on 15 April 2010.

The Working Group was made up of Dressage Committee Chair Frank Kemperman (Chairman), Richard Davison (GBR), Rider/Trainer; John P.

Roche (IRL), FEI Director Jumping/Stewarding; Jacques Van Daele (BEL), FEI Honorary Dressage Steward General/Judge; Wolfram Wittig (GER), Trainer; and Trond Asmyr (NOR), FEI Dressage and Para Equestrian Dressage Director/Judge.

Input was also received from Dr Gerd Heuschmann and Sjef Janssen and from the FEI Jumping Committee. 2012 Equestrian Australia Dressage Rulebook 98 Long and low: Section 12 – Notes for Dressage Event Organisers This guide is designed to assist Dressage Event Organisers who wish to run dressage events in Australia.

The notes must be read in conjunction with Sections 1-11 of the current EA Dressage rules.

A dressage event may vary from a small club training event to an official championship event.

Event organisers should refer any organisational or rule queries in the first instance to their State Dressage Authority (SDA).

The magnitude of the administration and field-work involved will vary according to the type and status of the event, organisers must use their judgment to adapt what ever is suitable to run an event in a professional manner. 12.1 Categories of Dressage Events Type of event FEI Events National Championships State Championships National Young Rider Championships State Young Rider Championships Official Pony Events incl Championships Club/Regional Championships Official Events Young Horse Qualifying Events Associate Events Training/Club Events 12.2         For Approval Apply To ADC/EA/FEI ADC SDA ADC SDA SDA SDA SDA SDA SDA N/A Required Required Required Required Required Required Required Required Required Required Required by some states Not required Calendar Application/s for permission to hold an Official dressage event or competition must be made in writing to the relevant SDA.

All Official events must be approved by the SDA all Official events will be listed in the appropriate SDA annual competition calendar all Associate event dates should be notified to the appropriate SDA if an Official event is cancelled the SDA must be notified date changes must have the approval of the SDA careful consideration of neighbouring clubs should be made when applying for dates be aware of your SDA closing date for applications to run Official events General Considerations oganising bodies wishing to conduct Official or Associate dressage events in Australia must be currently financial with EA, incorporated and hold a current EA approved Club insurance policy all Official and Associate events must be run in accordance with the current EA Dressage Rules all members of a Dressage Organising Committee should have access to a current EA Dressage Rule book Protests, Reports and Appeals (refer to EA General Regulations www.equestrian.org.au) OCs are to be aware of any legislation within their state in relation child Protection.

National, State and Territory sports organisations have developed child protection guidelines.

These guidelines can help you put policies in place to protect your club and your members.

For additional information on required checks for people working with juniors, please contact your State or Territory department of Sport and Recreation http://www.ausport.gov.au/supporting/clubs/resource_library/starting_a_club/child_protection OCs are responsible for assessing environmental issues such as extreme heat, storms, high winds etc which may make conditions for running an event unsafe for competitors and their horses Welfare of the horse is paramount at all events refer to rule 1.2 and 1.3 Venues  the best possible venue should be secured for the conduct of a dressage event  the venue should be booked well in advance of the proposed event  be aware of what facilities are or are not available  Examples of venue facilities: 99

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