Horse P : Pennsylvania 4 H Horse Show Rule Book Revised 2012 Prepared….

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GIFT VOUCHER Horses-store.comHorse P : Pennsylvania 4 H Horse Show Rule Book Revised 2012 Prepared….

Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Show Rule Book Revised 2012 Prepared by Pat Comerford, Tammy Eichstadt, Andrea Kocher, Patty Kelly, Donna Zang, Lew Trumble and Bethany Bickel with approval by The Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee. This publication is made possible through Pennsylvania 4-H educational materials fees.

Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences research and extension programs are funded in part by Pennsylvania counties, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the U.S.

Department of Agriculture.

Visit Penn State Extension on the web: extension.psu.edu Where trade names appear, no discrimination is intended, and no endorsement by Penn State Cooperative Extension is implied.

Penn State encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities.

If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact your local extension office in advance of your participation or visit.

This publication is available in alternative media on request.

The Pennsylvania State University is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to programs, facilities, admission, and employment without regard to personal characteristics not related to ability, performance, or qualifications as determined by University policy or by state or federal authorities.

It is the policy of the University to maintain an academic and work environment free of discrimination, including harassment.

The Pennsylvania State University prohibits discrimination and harassment against any person because of age, ancestry, color, disability or handicap, national origin, race, religious creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran status.

Discrimination or harassment against faculty, staff, or students will not be tolerated at The Pennsylvania State University.

Direct all inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policy to the Affirmative Action Director, The Pennsylvania State University, 328 Boucke Building, University Park, PA 16802-5901; Tel 814865-4700/V, 814-863-1150/TTY. © The Pennsylvania State University 2012 Code# A0600G Table of Contents Page 1-9 General Rules 5 Unsportsmanlike Conduct 6, 7 Protective Headgear 8, 9 Drugs and Medication 10-12 Show Committee, Officials 11-12 Protests 13-18 Production Rules 18-23 Performance Rules 23-32 Open Division 23-27 Grooming and Showmanship 27-32 Open Trail 33-47 Western Division 33, 34 Clothing & Equipment 34-36 Western Horsemanship 36 Western Pleasure 36-41 Western Riding 42-47 Novice Reining 48-51 Contest Division 49 Pole Bending 50 Barrel Race 51 Raised Box Keyhole 52-54 Saddle Seat Division 52 Clothing & Equipment 53, 54 Saddle Seat Equitation 54 Saddle Seat Pleasure 55-65 Hunt Seat Division 55 Clothing & Equipment 56-58 Hunt Seat Equitation 59, 60 Hunter Under Saddle 60-65 Working Hunter 65 Hunter Hack 66-74 Driving Division 66-68 General Specifications & Safety 69-71 Pleasure Driving 69, 70 Clothing & Equipment 71-72 Draft Horse Driving 71, 72 Clothing & Equipment 72-78 Miniature Horse Division 72-74 Miniature Horse Driving 75-78 Miniature Horse In Hand Trail 79-82 Therapeutic Riding Division 79-81 General Rules, Clothing & Equip. 81, 82 Obstacle Trail 82 Walk-Trot Equitation 83 Glossary 83 4-H Member Age Divisions 83 Definitions 84 Good Housekeeping Awards 85 4-H Behavioral Expectations 86 4-H Code of Conduct Inside back cover ….Animal Welfare Position i ii PENNSYLVANIA 4-H HORSE SHOW RULE BOOK This book supersedes all previously published rules and is effective January 2012.

Rulebook, class guidelines, and related information are available on the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program website: www.das.psu.edu Go to 4-H Programs–Horses– then Rules New or recently revised rules appear in boxes. (1) The Pennsylvania State 4-H Show, District Shows, Regional Production Shows, and County Round-ups or qualifying shows will be governed by the rules as stated in this book and any additional supplement(s) that may be distributed.

At all county, regional, and district shows, qualifying classes for the state show must follow state show rules with no additions, deletions, or modifications.

In order for an exhibitor to advance to the next show, the class must be conducted and the exhibitor must successfully compete at the qualifying show. (2) The State 4-H Horse Show Committee shall be the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee, plus any members appointed by the committee chairperson. (3) These rules are in effect for the 2012-2013 4-H horse show seasons.

Be sure to check for any change in the years after 2012, and any additional supplements that may be distributed. (4) Supplements to the rulebook will not be published on a regular basis.

Rule changes will be incorporated into the rulebook every two (2) years when a new rulebook is published.

Exception: supplements may be distributed in the event of a safety issue or other extenuating circumstance. (5) District, Area, and County Shows should put in place a committee structure that parallels those outlined in this Rule Book.

The rule books of the United States Equestrian Federation, the American Quarter Horse Association, and the American Driving Society were used as references in formulating certain of these rules. 1 General Rules 1.

It is obvious that, however complete rules may be, they never can cover all possible situations which may arise.

If a matter cannot be solved by interpreting the rules to the letter, the solution to be adopted by those responsible should lie in a principle which follows as nearly as possible the spirit of the rules. 2.

When the terms “prohibited”, “not permitted”, “mandatory”, “will”, “required”, “shall” or “must” are used in these rules, any competitor who fails to comply MUST BE DISQUALIFIED by the judge, unless another penalty is stipulated.

When the term “should” is used in these rules, and no penalty is prescribed, any competitor who fails to comply MAY BE PENALIZED by the judge. 3.

In the event of a dispute that is not covered in this Rule Book, the governing 4-H Horse Show Committee shall render a decision. 4.

The Show Committee’s decision is final in regards to a protest decision, rule violation interpretation and/or condition of the show grounds. 5.

In the event the Show Committee is not available, the Show Chairperson may render a decision and his/her decision is final in all decisions that the Show Committee would adjudicate. 6.

Whenever the words “horse” or “pony” appear, this includes all members of the equine family including mules and donkeys. 7. 4-H members must be enrolled with the county extension office in the 4-H Horse Project by June 1 of the current year to be eligible to show.

Pennsylvania 4-H Policy states that a 4-H member must be at least eight years of age and not have passed their nineteenth birthday before January 1.

Whenever this rulebook refers to June 1 the following applies: When June 1 falls on a business day, enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business.

If June 1 falls on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, then enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business on the next business day.

Counties may require earlier deadlines than noted in these rules for show entries and related paperwork.

County deadlines and requirements will apply as appropriate. 8.

All members, to be eligible to compete at the county level and further shows, must be enrolled with the extension office of the county in which they show, and complete appropriate requirements as determined by that county. 9.

Penn State encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities.

If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or 2 have questions about the physical access provided, please contact your county extension educator in advance of your participation or visit.

Requests for accommodations should be made to the extension educator at least three weeks in advance of the event (See General Rule 29). 10.

The 4-H member should care for (feed, exercise, and handle) the animal the majority of the time.

Adults should not do the majority of the work.

The 4-H member may have appropriate involvement or assistance from an adult.

Adults may assist or ride horses if needed for safety reasons.

This rule applies to all 4-H events including but not limited to shows, clinics, mounted meetings, etc. 11.

A 4-H member may have animals in the following projects: Production, Performance, and Competitive Trail Riding.

Refer to Production Rules and Performance Rules in this rule book for specific information regarding the number of animals that may be enrolled.

If a member is enrolled in the Competitive Trail Riding project, the animal used may be either the same animal used for Performance or Production, or it may be an additional animal.

Performance, Production and Competitive Trail Ride animals must be enrolled at the extension office by June 1 in order to show or compete in the current year.

Refer to Production Rules for enrollment deadlines for Production animals, and refer to Performance Rules and the State 4-H Competitive Trail Ride entry procedures (distributed annually to extension offices) for further details. 12.

A 4-H member may not have a horse project or/projects in more than one Pennsylvania county. 13.

A horse or pony shown as a 4-H project cannot be shared by 4-H members unless they are from the immediate family or live in the same home.

Exceptions: 1.

Riders in the therapeutic division are exempt from shared horse limitations. 2.

A horseless 4-H member who shares a horse may participate in classes at county and district shows designed for shared horse members.

The horseless member is not eligible to participate in classes that qualify for the State 4-H Horse Show.

The horse’s owner retains the right to participate in these qualifying classes.

See Guidelines for Shared Horse Activities available from county extension offices and the 4-H Horse Program website. 14.

All horses and ponies at 4-H and open horse shows sponsored by 4-H or used in rides at public events must be inoculated for rabies at least 30 days prior to the event if this is the animal’s initial 3 inoculation. (This ruling includes mares taken to production events.) Re-vaccination is required annually.

Vaccination is required for all horses over six (6) months of age.

Events that are required to follow Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) health regulations may have more restrictive rabies vaccination requirements that will supersede 4-H Horse Show rules.

Foals born March 15 of the current year and later are exempted from the requirement that rabies vaccine be administered at least 30 days prior to the show date.

Mules/donkeys that will be in 4-H shows and ponies participating in 4-H pony rides must also be vaccinated.

The PDA will only recognize a rabies vaccination administered by a licensed veterinarian or under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

The exact form to be used for rabies vaccination verification is not specified.

We will accept any legitimate proof of vaccination provided by a licensed veterinarian that includes the veterinarian’s signature, date of vaccination, and name and/or description of the horse.

Acceptable forms of vaccination verification include, but are not limited to, standard rabies certificate, itemized bill signed by the veterinarian, or statement on business letterhead that is signed by the veterinarian.

Verification of vaccination needs to be kept for two (2) years. 15.

All horses over six (6) months of age must have proof of current negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) status for all Pennsylvania 4-H horse shows and events.

This rule includes all broodmares taken to production events.

Any federal or Pennsylvania state recognized test results for EIA will be acceptable to document negative EIA status.

Tests must be dated within 12 months of the show or event. 16.

All current federal, state, and/or PDA health regulations will apply as appropriate.

Events that are required to follow PDA health regulations may have more restrictive requirements that will supersede 4-H Horse Show rules. 17.

Exhibitors who observe an animal that may present a health hazard to other horses are asked to report the horse and/or its stall location to the Show Committee.

The official show veterinarian in consultation with the Show Committee shall be responsible for determining the health status of all horses.

Horses showing evidence of contagious diseases shall be removed by their owner from the show grounds at the direction of the Show Chairperson. 4 18.

If there is a known occurrence of an infectious disease in a certain area, show management in consultation with a veterinarian and Cooperative Extension personnel, may require additional testing of, or documentation for horses from affected area(s).

Upon the advice of the consulting veterinarian, state veterinarian, and/or extension veterinarian, show management may prohibit horses from participating in 4-H events if deemed appropriate to protect the health, welfare, and safety of participants and horses. 19.

All animals must be serviceably sound for competition purposes.

Animals must not show evidence of lameness or any other unsoundness that renders the animal unsuitable for competition as determined by the official show veterinarian, a veterinarian appointed by the show committee, or the show judge, if a veterinarian is not available.

Animals with complete loss of sight in one eye may be found serviceably sound at the judge’s discretion. 20.

Cruelty, rough handling, inhumane or unethical treatment of horses will not be allowed at any show.

The Stewards, Judge, or Show Committee may disqualify anyone mistreating an animal. 21.

Assistance or coaching from outside the ring may be penalized by the judge at his or her discretion. 22.

When an exhibitor, parent, guardian, 4-H leader, coach, agent, or representative acting on behalf of an exhibitor is guilty of unsportsmanlike or unethical conduct, the 4-H Horse Show Committee may require the 4-H member to return all trophies and ribbons, forfeit the transportation allowance, and may suspend the 4-H member involved from participation in 4-H horse shows or events for such a period as judged appropriate.

A parent, guardian, 4-H leader, coach, agent, or representative acting on behalf of an exhibitor, deemed guilty of unsportsmanlike or unethical conduct may also be prohibited from participation in 4-H horse shows or events for such a period as judged appropriate.

Persons deemed guilty of unsportsmanlike conduct may be expelled from the show grounds at the direction of the Show Committee.

The results of such committee action will be sent in writing to the appropriate Extension Director and county extension office.

This rule applies at all times during any 4-H horse event, activity or show. 23.

An exhibitor does not have the right to inspect the judge’s cards.

However, an exhibitor may request of the Show Committee or Stewards the reason for a decision.

At the proper time and place, the Show Committee may request the Judge to give his or her 5 reasons.

A judge is not to be approached by any exhibitor or person acting on behalf of the exhibitor with regard to any decision while judging or about to judge. 24.

At a show no judge may be approached by an exhibitor, parent, extension educator, 4-H leader or anyone acting on behalf of an exhibitor without first obtaining the permission of a Steward or the Show Committee.

Following a show, communication with a judge in regards to specific show issues is prohibited without obtaining permission from the Show Committee or Steward. 25.

In all 4-H sponsored shows/activities, all exhibitors 18 years of age or younger, including all 4-H exhibitors regardless of age, are required to wear properly fastened protective headgear which meets or exceeds current ASTM (American Society for Testing Materials) / SEI (Safety Equipment Institute) standards for equestrian use and carries the SEI tag.

Headgear must be properly fitted with harness secured and is required while riding or driving anywhere on the event grounds and in all classes except for Grooming and Showmanship and Miniature Horse In Hand Trail.

Headgear may not be modified in any manner, other than to adjust fit with pads supplied by the manufacturer.

Helmet covers may be used provided they can be removed for inspection of the helmet if necessary.

The show committee must immediately prohibit any exhibitor violating this rule at any time from further participation until such headgear is properly in place.

During a show class, if the show committee determines that the headgear is inappropriate and the exhibitor is in violation of the rule, the exhibitor will be disqualified from that class and immediately prohibited from further participation until appropriate headgear is properly in place.

It is the responsibility of the exhibitor, the parent or guardian, and the trainer of the exhibitor to see the headgear is worn at the appropriate times, complies with the appropriate safety standards for protective headgear intended for equestrian use, and is properly fitted and in good condition.

The show committee, show officials and volunteer leaders are not responsible for checking headgear worn for such compliance unless the appropriateness of such headgear is questioned.

Refer to the PA 4-H Horse Program Protective Headgear Policy Questions and Answers pamphlet for further clarification of the protective headgear rule. (Pamphlet available from county extension offices 6 or the 4-H Horse Program website.) Additional information on approved protective headgear is available at: www.seinet.org or www.usef.org The Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee, Pennsylvania State 4-H Horse Show Committee, and the Pennsylvania State University make no representation or warranty, express or implied, regarding any protective headgear, and caution exhibitors and their respective parents or guardians that death or serious injury may result despite wearing such headgear, as all equestrian sports involve inherent dangerous risk and as no helmet can protect against all foreseeable injuries.

In all classes the use of additional safety equipment is permitted, including a protective safety vest specifically designed for use in equestrian sport and any exhibitor may show with this equipment in any class without judging discrimination. 26.

A rider may not be fastened or attached in any manner to the horse or tack in any class. “Magic Seats” and rubber bands securing feet in stirrups are not allowed.

In any class, the judge, steward, or show committee may require the removal or alteration of any equipment which is unsafe or inhumane in his/her opinion. 27.

The judge may excuse any exhibitor due to concerns for the safety of any participant or horse in any class.

Safety concerns, including animal behavior issues, brought to the attention of the Show Committee should be addressed in an appropriate manner. 28.

The fall of a horse or rider in any class is cause for elimination with the following exception: In Contest Classes a fall or separation will be cause for elimination only if it occurs after the starting line and before the finish line.

Any horse that becomes detached from its handler/rider and is not under control by the handler/rider will be disqualified and excused.

The ring conduct of any exhibitor and/or their horse should not adversely affect the exhibition of any other exhibitor’s horse in the ring.

Exhibitors adversely affecting other exhibitors’ performance may be penalized or excused at the judge’s discretion. 29.

Any personal equipment (protective headgear, riding apparel, tack, mounting blocks or ramp, etc.) must be provided by the 4-H member and their parent and/or guardian. 30.

In case of broken equipment or loss of shoe, the exhibitor must continue without delay or be eliminated.

Exceptions as noted in “Classes 39, 40, 7 41 and 42, Working Hunters, and also in the Glossary, item 5. 31.

Failure to use required tack, equipment, or attire or the use of prohibited tack, equipment, or attire will be cause for disqualification.

The judge may penalize an exhibitor for the use of nontraditional or inappropriate tack or equipment at his/her discretion. 32.

Failure by the exhibitor to wear the correct number in a visible manner may result in a penalty at the judge’s discretion. 33.

If an exhibitor is disqualified, then he/she may be immediately excused from the arena at the discretion of show management and the judge. 34.

Dogs or other pet animals either leashed, or unleashed will not be permitted in any part of the Farm Show Complex during the State 4-H Horse Show.

This includes the spectator area of the arena and the entire stable area. 35.

Drugs & medication a.

No horse or pony may be shown in any class if it has been administered, in any manner, a forbidden substance.

A forbidden substance is any substance, including but not limited to stimulants, depressants, or local anesthetics which might affect the performance of a horse. (stimulants and depressants are defined as substances which stimulate or depress the circulatory, respiratory, or central nervous systems).

Also prohibited are any drugs and substances, regardless of how harmless or innocuous they might be, which by their very nature might mask or screen the presence of the aforementioned prohibited drugs, or prevent or delay testing procedures.

B.

The full use of modern therapeutic measures including phenylbutazone for the improvement and protection of the health of the horse is permitted, unless the treatment may also stimulate or depress the circulatory, respiratory, or central nervous systems.

C.

Horses in competition are subject to examination by a licensed veterinarian appointed by the Show Committee.

The examination may include physical, saliva, urine, and blood tests or any other tests or procedures necessary to effectuate the purposes of this rule.

Said veterinarian may examine any or all horses in a class or classes in the show.

D.

Should the chemical analysis of blood, urine, saliva, or other samples taken from the horse indicate the presence of a forbidden substance, this shall be prima facie evidence that a forbidden substance has been administered to the horse.

When a positive report identifying a forbidden substance is received from the testing laboratory, a 8 hearing will be held by the State Show Committee.

The 4-H member involved will be notified ten days prior to the meeting.

The 4-H member may attend the hearing at his/her option and may bring witnesses, sworn statements or other evidence in their behalf.

E.

The Show Committee may require the 4-H member to return all trophies and/or ribbons, forfeit the transportation allowance and may suspend the 4-H member and the horse or pony involved from competing in 4-H competitive events for a period of one year.

The result of said hearing will be sent in writing to the appropriate Extension Director and county extension office.

F.

Refusal to submit to the drug test will be interpreted as prima facie evidence of guilt.

G.

Any horse or pony exhibited that receives any medication which contains a forbidden substance shall not be eligible for competition unless the following requirements are met and the facts requested are furnished in writing. 1.

The medication must be therapeutic and necessary for the treatment of illness or injury. 2.

The horse must be withdrawn from competition for a period of not less than 24 hours after the medication is administered. 3.

The medication must be administered by a licensed veterinarian, if available and in his or her absence by the 4-H member or designated representative. 4.

Identification of medication; the amount, strength, and mode of administration. 5.

Date and time of administration. 6.

Identification of horse, its name, age, sex, color and entry number. 7.

Diagnosis and reason for administration. 8.

Statement signed by person administering the medication. 9.

Statement filed with Steward within one hour after administration or one hour after the Steward returns to duty if administration was at a time other than Show hours. 10.

Statement signed by the Steward and time of receipt recorded on the statement by the Steward.

H.

If the chemical analysis of the sample taken from a horse so treated indicates the presence of a forbidden substance, and all of the requirements of paragraph g.

Have been fully complied with, the information in said medication report and any other relevant evidence shall be considered by the hearing committee in determining guilt or innocence of the 4-H member charged under the provisions of this rule. 9 Show Committee Show Committees should refer to Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Show Management Guidelines and Horses, Safety and You – How to Work With and Around a Horse Safely. (available from County Extension Offices and the 4-H Horse Program website). 1.

The Show Committee shall be responsible for the operation of the show.

It shall be the duty of this committee to enforce all rules as set forth in this rule book. 2.

Show committees should consist of at least one or more persons experienced in horse show management.

It is recommended that show committees follow these or other acceptable guidelines as closely as possible at all 4-H horse shows. 3.

The Show Committee must address and take necessary action to ensure the safety of exhibitors, horses, spectators, and all show participants when planning and conducting shows. 4.

The Show Committee shall determine all Trail, Working Hunter and Equitation Over Fences courses and obtain approval from the judge prior to posting.

Courses must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

It is the judge’s responsibility in consultation with the Show Committee to provide patterns/tests for all other classes as appropriate.

Degree of difficulty of patterns/tests should be appropriate for age division. 5.

The Show Committee shall eliminate, without waiting for a protest, an improper entry of a horse or rider or driver. 6.

Show Committee members have the responsibility to alert the Show Committee Chairman or Steward of any rule violations or situations that may lead to a protest. 7.

The Show Committee shall determine the working order in individual performance classes. 8.

The Show Committee may require announcement of individual disqualifications in timed or scored events as they occur. 9.

The Show Committee shall weigh all facts and information pertaining to or regarding a protest, rule violation and/or error before rendering a decision. 10.

Clerical and/or mathematical errors, may be corrected by the Show Committee and/or in consultation with the Judge during a class or after a class has been placed, but no later than 30 minutes after the conclusion of the show. 10 Stewards Stewards shall be appointed by the Show Committee.

A Steward should clearly understand he or she has no connection with Show Committee decisions or the judging of the Show.

The Steward should point out in a diplomatic manner any instance where the rules are not enforced.

The Steward should not dictate to the Judges or the Show Committee, but should immediately report to the appropriate officials any violations of the rules which might invalidate a class.

The Steward should be available to Judges, exhibitors, and the Show Committee at all times to clarify the application of the State 4-H Horse Show Rules, and to investigate any situation in which the rules are not upheld.

The other duties of the Steward shall be, but shall not be limited to, the following: 1.

To verify the enforcement of the Show rules. 2.

To protect the interest of exhibitors, Judges, and Show Committee. 3.

To report to the Show Committee any misrepresentation or substitution of entry without waiting for a protest. 4.

To supervise and record “time outs.” 5.

To report to the Show Committee Chairman any offense or violation of the rules committed by an exhibitor, judge, or official.

Judges 1.

Good judging depends upon the correct observation of horses and/or riders and the measuring of them against a standard commonly accepted as the ideal, according to the conditions of the class being judged.

A judge serves three interests: his or her own conscience, the exhibitors, and the spectators.

The judge should make clear to the audience that it is the best horses or riders who win. 4-H is a learning experience, and the members should be able to follow the judging procedure. 2.

The Judge may excuse an exhibitor for the abuse of an animal in the show arena and/or evidence that an act of abuse has occurred.

The judge may excuse a horse at any time while in the arena for unsafe or inhumane conditions pertaining to the horse and/or rider. 3.

A judge must adjudicate each class in conformity with the rules and specifications of the class as they appear in this Rule Book.

A judge may choose not to place any exhibitor that does not fulfill the requirements of a class as specified in this rulebook. 4.

The judge may excuse any exhibitor due to concerns for the safety of any participant or horse in any class. 11 5.

The decision of each judge is final and represents a non-protestable expression of individual preference, unless a decision is alleged to be in violation of the rules. 6.

The Judge should approve Trail and Working Hunter and Equitation Over Fences courses prior to the Show Committee posting such courses. 7.

It is the Judge’s responsibility to provide Showmanship, Horsemanship, Saddle Seat Equitation and Equitation on the Flat patterns/tests to the show committee and determine the pattern to be used for Western Riding.

The judge should consult with the Show Committee to determine the appropriate degree of difficulty in these patterns/tests.

Protests A protest may be made by an exhibitor participating in the class, by his or her parents, the county educator, or a 4-H Leader or Volunteer for any violation of the rules governing a particular class.

All protests must be lodged verbally or in writing to the Show Committee prior to the announcement of the placing of that particular class.

Protests must be accompanied by $50.00 cash.

If the protest is upheld, the funds will be returned.

However, if the protest is denied, the funds will be deposited in the horse show account.

Height measurement protests must also be accompanied by $50.00 cash, see height measurement rule, Performance Rules, rule 17c.

The Show Committee or Show Chairperson shall determine decisions regarding protests prior to the announcement of the placing of the class.

The Judge may ask the Show Committee for clarification of the Steward’s interpretation of the rules as written.

The show committee’s decision regarding a protest shall be final and considered accepted by all exhibitors.

Video footage will not be reviewed as evidence in a protest situation.

Non protestable decisions include : The soundness of a horse when determined by the official veterinarian of the show or by the judge if a veterinarian is not available.

A judge’s decision shall represent his or her individual opinion.

An animal’s height is not protestable at a district or state show, providing the exhibitor has a valid PA 4-H Height Certificate. 12 Production Rules The production division is for horses 5 years of age and under.

In-hand classes are offered for horses 3 years of age and under and are judged on: 75% conformation, breed, type and condition of horse and 25% on handling ability of exhibitor (ability of exhibitor to safely control and properly present the horse to the judge).

Futurity classes are offered for 2, 3, 4 and 5 year old horses.

Western Pleasure futurity classes are judged according to rules for Western Pleasure.

English Pleasure futurity classes may include diverse breeds and/or types and are judged according to the rules for Saddle Type Pleasure and Hunter Under Saddle as appropriate.

Current PA 4-H Horse Production Project Guidelines will apply at all production shows.

Guidelines are available from county extension offices or the 4-H Horse Program website. 1. 4-H members must be 12 years of age or older or have passed handling skills of the Level 1 Horsemanship Skills Program with each production project animal to show at county, regional, or state 4-H production shows.

Youth under 12 years of age exhibiting in pleasure futurity classes must have passed the entire Level 1 Horsemanship Skills test in order to show.

Youth under 12 must retest the appropriate Level 1 Skills on an annual basis with each production project animal to be shown.

For 4-H members under 12 years of age, a copy of the Level 1 Horsemanship Skills Evaluation Sheet must be included with entry forms or submitted at the show for each animal.

The Evaluation Sheet must include signatures of 3 trained Horsemanship Skills examiners and indicate that the youth has passed all applicable horsemanship skills.

Youth under 12 years of age who have not passed Level 1 handling skills may be enrolled in the production project but will not be allowed to show until they are 12 years of age (4-H age as of January 1 of current year) or meet the horsemanship skills requirement. 2.

Record book must be up-to-date before a member will be eligible to compete at a regional production show.

A Grooming, Showmanship and Handling Skills score must be obtained prior to the state show.

All members to be eligible to compete at the regional and state production shows must have completed appropriate project requirements as determined by each county. 3.

A production project animal may also be used as the member’s performance project animal, with the following exceptions; 13 a.

No animals 2 years of age or younger will be allowed to compete in any riding or driving classes in the performance division.

B.

Animals one (1) year of age and older may be shown in Showmanship and Mini In-Hand Trail.

C.

No colts or stallions will be allowed to compete in any performance class. 4.

Project animals must be owned or leased by the 4-H member or a member of his or/her immediate family prior to June 1 to show that year.

The immediate family rule does not apply to animals that are the bona fide property of a 4-H club.

The County Extension Office will determine eligibility in such cases.

Leased horses will be eligible if the following items are adhered to: a.

Lessee must have a verbal or written lease.

If the lease is written, the standardized 4-H Horse Project Lease Agreement Form must be used, or must have prior approval by the 4-H insurance company before the lease is signed.

B.

Lease must be for the minimum of the project year (June 1 current year to day following the State 4-H Horse Show.) c.

The lease may be between the 4-H member and the owner or the parent or guardian of the 4-H member and owner.

D.

A copy of the lease, or notification of an oral lease must be provided to the County Extension Office no later than June 1 of the current year. 5.

Animals may be enrolled in the production project at any time during the calendar year.

No animals may be initially enrolled in the project after the year they are three years old (See rule 14 regarding age of horse) (broodmares excepted).

In the event that an enrolled animal is sold, its eligibility is transferred to the new 4-H member, provided the new member/owner meets all requirements to show that year. 6.

Project animals do not necessarily have to be shown each calendar year but must be enrolled by June 1 to complete project requirements for the current year. 7.

To be eligible for the current year’s 4-H Horse Production Shows, the 4-H member’s animal(s) must be enrolled and designated as the member’s project animal(s) in the 4-H horse production project by June 1 of the current year. 8.

Animals 3 years of age and older must be enrolled annually to maintain eligibility for showing. 9.

Foals of the current year must be born by May 1 and entered by the show entry deadline in order to show in 4-H shows.

Broodmares can be enrolled as a project animal, but may not be exhibited at regional 14 production shows.

Mares will not be permitted in the arena with their foals while the foal is being shown. 10.

In the event an enrolled animal becomes unsound or dies prior to the regional show, only animals enrolled in the production project by June 1 may be substituted.

Under no conditions may animals be substituted after the regional production show. 11.

Animals will be shown in hand with halter or bridle in the manner that is conventional for the respective breed or type. 12.

Production show exhibitors are permitted to show and dress according to respective breed association standards, or they may see the appropriate notation under western, hunter or saddle seat divisions, in performance rules.

However, coats will not be required for In-hand classes.

Protective headgear is required in all production classes.

Canvas shoes or sneakers are prohibited. 13.

Dress requirements for Draft Horse exhibitors: The handler and “trailer”, if used, must be neat and clean and quietly dressed.

Attire should be suitable for the show ring and the job at hand and fit properly without being too loose or too tight.

Girls may wear skirt or slacks.

T-shirts, halter tops and tank tops are prohibited.

Canvas shoes or sneakers are prohibited.

Vests, jackets, and ties are optional. 14.

The age of a horse is established on the basis of a calendar year starting January 1 of the year foaled.

The animal is a weanling during the calendar year in which it was foaled and a yearling during the first calendar year following its foaling date, regardless of the time of year foaled.

For example, a horse foaled anytime in 2012 is considered a yearling on January 1, 2013; two years old on January 1, 2014, three years old on January 1, 2015, and so on. 15.

No stallions or jacks older than weanlings will be allowed to be shown in production classes. 16.

Horses will be shown by breed or type, and according to age. 17.

A schedule of registered classes will be offered for horses that are registered in the breed associations listed.

Animals of different breeds will not be shown in the same registered class.

All unregistered horses or horses registered in associations not listed as follows will be shown by type as unregistered or grade animals. BREED Appaloosa Arabian Buckskin Haflinger Half Arabian ASSOCIATION Appaloosa Horse Club, Inc.

The Arabian Horse Association or Canadian Arabian Horse Registry International Buckskin Horse Assn.

Or American Buckskin Registry Assn.

American Haflinger Registry International Arabian Horse Assn. 15 Miniature Horse Morgan Paint Palomino Paso Fino Pinto POA Quarter Horse Saddlebred Shetland Pony Standardbred Tennessee Walking Thoroughbred Welsh Pony Half Welsh Warmblood Belgian Clydesdale Percheron Shire American Miniature Horse Assn.

Or American Miniature Horse Registry American Morgan Horse Assn.

Inc.

American Paint Horse Association Palomino Horse Breeders of America or Palomino Horse Association Inc.

Paso Fino Horse Assn.

Inc.

Pinto Horse Assn.

Of America Inc.

Pony of Americas Club Inc.

Am.

American Quarter Horse Assn.

American Saddlebred Horse Assn.

Or Canadian American Saddlebred Horse Registry American Shetland Pony Club U.S.

Trotting Assn.

Tennessee Walking Horse Breeders and Exhibitors Association The Jockey Club Welsh Pony and Cob Society of America or Welsh Section Canadian Pony Society Performance Horse Registry or Respective Warmblood Breed Registry Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America Clydesdale Breeders of the US Percheron Horse Assn.

Of America American Shire Horse Assn. 18.

An animal shown in one breed or type division cannot be shown in another division or type at future shows during that year, and animals registered in more than one association may be shown in only one breed/type class.

Double registered animals may be shown as the opposite breed in future years. 19.

Classes for Appaloosa, Paint, or other breeds with color classifications will not be divided into solid, non-characteristic, breeding stock, etc.

Categories. 20.

Type classes for horses and ponies include all grade and unregistered animals for which a specific breed class is not offered.

Classes will be offered for Draft type, Stock type, Saddle type, Hunter type horses and ponies, Long Ears (Donkey and Mule type over 14.2 and under 14.2) and Miniature Horse type.

Grade draft horses will be shown together.

Pony classes are for those animals expected to mature to a height of 14.2 hands and under.

Both grade and registered animals will be shown together in Long Ears classes. 21.

The following classes may be offered for each breed or type: REGISTERED AND UNREGISTERED ANIMALS 1.

Colts and geldings of this year 2.

Yearling Geldings 3. 2-year-old Geldings 4. 3-year-old Geldings 5.

Fillies of this year 6.

Yearling Fillies 7. 2-year-old Fillies 8. 3-year-old Fillies LONG EARS (Donkeys, Mules) 1.

Jacks and geldings of this year 2.

Yearling Geldings 3. 2-year-old Geldings 4. 3-year-old Geldings 5.

Jennet of this year 6.

Yearling Jennet 7. 2 -year-old Jennet 8. 3-year-old Jennet 16 22.

In addition to the halter classes, Western and English Pleasure Futurity classes will be offered.

Horses may be shown in only one halter class and only one futurity class each year.

Futurity classes will be judged as pleasure classes and are open to two, three, four and five year old animals that are properly enrolled in the Production project (see production rules 4-8 for requirements for enrollment and eligibility for showing.) 23.

Separate pleasure futurity classes will be offered for two year olds.

The two year old classes include walk and trot/jog only and are not eligible to advance to the state show.

If the number of entries so warrant, separate classes will be offered for three, four and five year olds; otherwise they may be combined at show management’s discretion.

The three, four and five year old classes include walk, trot/jog and canter/lope and are eligible to advance to the state show. 24.

The appropriate rules for tack and appointments from the performance classes will apply to Western and English Pleasure Futurity classes. 25.

All rules concerning registration of horses are in accordance with each breed association rules. 26.

In all registered production classes, photocopies of the horses’ registration papers must be submitted with entries for the regional show by the show entry deadline.

For weanlings, either breeder’s certificates or application for registration must be submitted with entries for the Regional Production Show by the show entry deadline.

For draft breeds where registration paper, breeders certificate or application for registry is unavailable, a signed statement must be obtained from the owners of the sire and dam indicating that the horse is eligible for registration.

This statement must be presented with entries for the regional show by the show entry deadline. 27.

If registration papers (or documentation as indicated in rule 26) are unavailable by the show entry deadline, the horse must be shown as a grade animal and must continue to be shown as a grade animal that year.

In future years, the horse may be shown as a registered animal with proper proof of registration. 28.

There is no limit to the number of horses a 4-H member may enter in the regional show; however, a 4-H member is limited to one entry per class. (This rule will not apply to classes that have been combined.) In the state show a 4-H member will be limited to entering three Production Project animals. 17 29.

To be eligible for the State 4-H Horse Show entries must qualify at one of the Regional Production Shows.

Entries for the state show must be made at the regional show.

All exhibitors who qualify and intend to show at the state show MUST report to the regional show office or designated show secretary to verify their state show entry, submit required forms, and obtain state show information.

Exhibitors MUST report to the show office within 30 minutes of the placing of the last class of the show.

Late entries will NOT be accepted.

Exhibitors who fail to verify their entry and submit appropriate information will NOT be allowed to participate in the state show. 30.

If there are less than two horses entered in a State Show class, the classes may be combined and the entries shown together.

If there is no reasonable combination of entries, single entries will be shown individually in separate classes.

Those 4-H members showing in a combined or single entry class will be notified by September 20 or as soon as possible. 31.

Substitute showperson may be used ONLY in the case of medical necessity or call-up for military service involving the exhibitor.

The substitute exhibitor must be a current 4-H member in good standing in their county.

Performance Rules 1.

The horse or pony a member intends to use in competition must be designated and recorded with the county extension office by June 1 of the current year. 2.

A production project animal may also be used as a performance project animal. 3.

All members, to be eligible to compete at the county level and further shows, must be enrolled with the extension office of the county in which they show, and complete appropriate requirements as determined by that county. 4.

Record book must be up to date, including a Grooming and Showmanship score, before a member will be eligible to compete at a district show. 5.

Two or more members of an immediate family may show the same horse at the county, district and state shows, management of project to be shared.

However, they may not show in the same class.

Refer to Glossary number 10 and General Rule 13. 6.

Project animals must be owned or leased by the 4-H member or a member of his or/her immediate family prior to June 1 to show that year.

The immediate family rule does not apply to animals that are the bona fide property of a 4-H club.

The County Extension Office will determine eligibility in such 18 cases.

Leased horses will be eligible if the following items are adhered to: a.

Lessee must have a verbal or written lease.

If the lease is written, the standardized 4-H Horse Project Lease Agreement must be used, or must have prior approval by the 4-H insurance company before it is signed.

B.

Lease must be for the minimum of the project year (June 1 current year to day following the State 4-H Horse Show.) c.

The lease may be between the 4-H member and the owner or the parent or guardian of the 4-H member and owner.

D.

A copy of the lease, or notification of an oral lease, must be provided to the County Extension Office no later than June 1 of the current year. 7.

A member must show the same horse at county, district, and state shows.

The contestant must compete and qualify to be eligible to advance to the next show.

If the horse that competed at a county or district roundup is injured or the member cannot compete at the next show, the next lower placing member in the class may compete at the next show.

It is the responsibility of the county or district show committee to enforce this rule.

Each county should determine which show will be the elimination show, and when substitutions should be made. 8.

To be eligible for the State 4-H Horse Show entries must qualify at the district show designated for the county in which they are enrolled. 9.

Entries for the state show must be made at the district show, except in the case of substitutions.

District substitutions for the State Show must be made by the district chairperson no later than 7 days prior to the State Show.

All exhibitors who qualify and intend to show at the state show MUST report to the regional/district show office or designated show secretary to verify their state show entry, submit required forms, and obtain state show information.

Exhibitors MUST report to the show office within 30 minutes of the placing of the last class of the show.

Late entries will NOT be accepted.

Exhibitors who fail to verify their entry and submit appropriate information will NOT be allowed to participate in the state show. 10.

If a veterinary certificate states that the project animal is unsound prior to the county show it will be permissible to change project animals, with the Club Leader’s and county extension educator’s approval.

Under no conditions may horses be changed after the county elimination show. 11.

In the Performance Division, a 4-H member is permitted to show only one primary performance 19 animal.

One secondary performance animal may be shown in its appropriate driving class and/or Miniature Horse In Hand Trail. 12.

A draft or miniature horse may be used as the member’s primary performance horse in nondriving classes if the member does not have a light performance horse or pony.

Classes are offered in the following divisions:  Open Division Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail  Western Division Western Pleasure, Western Horsemanship, Western Riding, Novice Reining  Contest Division Clover Leaf Barrel Race, Pole Bending, and Raised Box Keyhole  Saddle Seat Division Saddle Seat Pleasure and Saddle Seat Equitation  Hunt Seat Division Hunter under Saddle, Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat), Hunter Hack, Working Hunter, and Equitation over Fences — Pleasure Driving and Draft Driving  Miniature Horse Division Miniature Horse Driving, Miniature Horse In Hand Trail  Therapeutic Riding Division Obstacle Trail and Walk-Trot Equitation A performance animal may compete in only one of the following divisions; Western Seat, Hunt Seat, Saddle Seat, Contest or Miniature Horse.

Refer to the beginning of each division section for class eligibility. 13.

No exhibitor may show a project animal in more than one type of seat/attire.

Exception: Driving 14.

A 4-H member may not show the same animal in both pony and horse classes or both pony and miniature horse classes. 15.

An animal may be shown in only one driving class. 16.

A member may show in only one equitation class. 17a.

ONLY animals exhibited in classes identified as pony or miniature horse classes must be measured.

Animals under six years-of-age must be measured annually within the calendar year of the county roundup or first qualifying show.

Animals six years of age and older must also be measured within the calendar year of the county roundup or first qualifying show unless they have a valid PA 4-H Height certificate, including a toe and heel measurement.

The animals are to be measured by two Certified Measurers who have been certified since January 1, 20 1996, and who may be extension educators and/or screened county volunteers; Measurer Trainers designated by the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee may also measure animals.

To be certified, measurers must have successfully completed certification training with an official Measurer Trainer.

An animal may be measured by a certified measurer(s) from another county only with prior approval of their county extension educator.

Refer to “Measurement Techniques for Ponies” for additional information on measurement procedures (available at county extension offices or the 4-H Horse Program website).

Measurements are to be made on an unshod basis.

Standard forms and instructions are available from county extension office. 17b.

If the animal is five years of age or under and has a valid height certificate for the current year, it may continue to show for that show year and the height of the animal is not protestable. 17c.

If the animal is six years of age or older its height may be protested.

A $50.00 cash fee must accompany measurement protests.

If protest is upheld, $50.00 will be returned to the party filing the protest.

If protest is denied, funds will be deposited into the county 4-H horse account.

If height is protested before the county qualifying show, a written protest must be filed with the county extension office at least 30 days prior to the show.

The re-measurement must occur within 30 days of the date the written protest is received in the county office.

The 4-H member must deliver the animal to a predetermined location for remeasurement.

At re-measurement the animal must show no evidence of lameness.

The animal may have been trimmed or reshod and will measure as it stands.

If height is protested at the county qualifying show, the protest must be filed with the show committee or steward.

Re-measurement must be done immediately, so that no change can be made by reshoeing or trimming.

If the re-measurement exceeds the height limit for the class in which the animal is being shown by more than ½ inch the animal must be disqualified or if possible transferred to the proper class. 17d.

If height is protested, re-measurement must be done by a Measurer Trainer and a Certified Measurer, or two Certified Measurers.

Once an animal’s height has been verified by re-measurement, that height then becomes non-protestable for the current year.

An animal’s height is not protestable at a district or state 21 show, providing the exhibitor has a valid PA 4-H Height Certificate. 18.

No 2 year olds will be allowed to compete in any riding or driving performance classes.

Animals one (1) year of age and older may be shown in Showmanship and Miniature In-Hand Trail. 19.

No colts or stallions will be allowed to compete in any performance class. 20.

A class begins with the Contestant’s entry into the show ring, except as noted in Contest classes. 21.

All animals entered in an individual performance class must be assembled at the entrance to the arena in ample time for the judging to start promptly and to continue without delay, and shall remain there (except while competing) until dismissed.

A tardy contestant may be denied competition. 22.

In the event of electric timer failure, a rider will be permitted to rerun, by adding his/her number to the bottom of the working order. 23.

All riders must ride astride. 24.

No bandages or boots of any type are allowed in any class except where specified. 25.

Because the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program is diverse in both its divisions and in the breeds that compete, it is difficult to generate a complete list of acceptable bits.

If exhibitors have questions concerning a bit they wish to use, and that specific bit is not mentioned in these rules, then exhibitors should ask the show stewards and/or the judge if the bit is acceptable for that show.

Exhibitors should have alternative bits available so that they can make a change if it is determined by show officials that their preferred bit is unacceptable for that show.

Each county, district or regional, and state show is officiated by different stewards and judges.

Therefore, exhibitors must seek approval from show officials at each show before using the questionable bit.

Members should consult with professionals in their riding discipline or contact the appropriate breed association for guidance in selecting a bit in order to find one that is both appropriate and acceptable for use in Pennsylvania Horse Shows.

For more information, refer to the Glossary and Guidelines for Bits in Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Shows (available from county extension offices or on the website). 26.

Mechanical hackamores are permitted in Contest classes only. 27.

Bitless bridles other than non mechanical hackamores/bosals are considered non-traditional equipment and may be penalized at the judge’s discretion. 22 28.

All Western horses six years or older must be ridden with one hand with the exception of Novice Reining.

See glossary rule 8. 29.

Western horses five years old and younger may be shown with a bit, hackamore or snaffle bit.

When a western horse is shown with a bit (excluding a true snaffle bit), it must be ridden with one hand with the exception of Novice Reining.

See glossary rules 6, 7 and 8. 30.

If a curb chain is used, it must be a flat type chain link, laying flat against the chin and loose enough to permit the entry of two fingers.

No wire or rawhide device, regardless of how padded or taped, may be used in conjunction with, or as part of, the chin strap. 31.

No horse or pony may be shown with their tongues tied down or with their mouths tied shut.

The correct use of a cavesson does not constitute tying a mouth shut.

Open Division See other divisions to determine eligibility for classes in the Open division.

Open Division Clothing and equipment requirements: See appropriate notations under Western and English divisions.

Classes 1,2,3 and 4 – Grooming and Showmanship Class 1 – English Grooming and Showmanship, Junior Division Class 2 – English Grooming and Showmanship, Senior Division Class 3 – Western Grooming and Showmanship, Junior Division Class 4 – Western Grooming and Showmanship, Senior Division The class is judged on the exhibitor’s ability to prepare and exhibit his/her animal at halter.

The horse is a tool to demonstrate the exhibitor’s abilities.

The judge should consider: (1) ability of the exhibitor to move the animal freely at the walk and trot, to set up and pose the animal, and to show him to the best advantage; (2) condition and cleanliness of hair coat, mane, tail and feet, which should show evidence of regular grooming; (3) neatness of any clipping, trimming or braiding; and (4) clean well fitted tack.

Grooming assistance may be obtained from immediate family members or 4-H adult or teen leaders.

However, the majority of the work must be done by the 4-H member.

All horses and ponies are to be shown with a halter, however, those breeds or types normally shown in a bridle, such as Arabians, Hunters, Morgans, Saddle Horses, etc., may show in 23 a bridle.

In this class, the horse or pony may be shown with the lead shank under the jaw or over the nose.

Exhibitors with draft horses and other breeds not exhibited in Saddle Seat, Hunt Seat or Western classes may show in either English or Western Grooming and Showmanship classes.

These exhibitors should choose the class they prefer and must show with clothing and tack appropriate for the western, hunt seat or saddleseat division.

See clothing requirements for these divisions.

If an exhibitor also shows a horse in under saddle classes, the style of attire worn while riding must also be used for the Grooming and Showmanship class.

Basis of Scoring Grooming and Showmanship A.

Appearance of Animal and exhibitor 30 % 1.

Condition of the animal 2.

Grooming a.

Coat clean and free of stains.

Should show evidence of regular grooming.

Hair dressing and powder should be used sparingly b.

Mane and tail clean and free of tangles.

C.

Hooves trimmed and shaped to enable animal to walk and stand naturally.

If shod, shoes must fit and not show undue wear.

Clinches should be smooth.

Hoof dressing permitted.

D.

Tack and/or equipment should be clean and neat and should fit properly. 3.

Trimming and Braiding a.

Excess hair should be clipped or trimmed from around fetlocks and head.

Horse may be totally clipped or not, as exhibitor wishes, but clipping should not be used as a substitute for proper grooming.

B.

Braiding, if used, should be neat and suitable for the type of horse.

Western manes may be banded (sectioned off using rubber bands). 4.

Exhibitor Exhibitor must be neat, clean, and dressed in attire appropriate for breed or type.

Exhibitor should be poised, confident, courteous and sportsmanlike at all times.

B.

Showmanship 70 % Exhibitors will each perform an individual pattern at the direction of the judge or ringmaster.

Pattern must be posted at least one hour prior to the class.

Patterns may be performed from a lineup or from the gate at the judge’s discretion.

The following maneuvers are considered acceptable components of a pattern: lead the horse at a walk, jog, trot or extended trot, back in a straight or curved line, stop, turn 90, 180, 270, 360 degrees or 24 any combination or multiple of these turns.

Judge must have the exhibitor set-up the horse for inspection at least once during the pattern.

The exhibitor should appear business-like, stand and move in a straight, natural, upright manner, and avoid excessive, unnatural, or animated body positions.

Both arms should be bent at the elbow with the elbows held close to the exhibitor’s side and the forearms held in a natural position.

Height of the arms may vary depending on the size of the horse and exhibitor.

The exhibitor should quickly recognize conformational faults of the animal he/she is leading and show it so as to minimize these faults.

Exhibitor should keep an eye on the animal, be aware of the location of the judge at all times, and not become distracted by people and things outside the ring.

Exhibitors are being judged from the moment they enter the ring.

Exhibitors should respond rapidly to requests from judges and officials and keep showing until the entire class has been placed or they are excused from the ring. 1.

Leading a.

Walk on the animal’s left (near) side holding the lead shank in the right hand, near the halter.

The exhibitor’s hand should not be on the chain or snap of the lead shank.

The remaining portion of the lead shank is held neatly and safely in the left hand, either in a figure-eight or one or two large loops.

A tightly coiled or rolled lead shank will be considered a fault in showmanship.

All turns greater than 90 degrees should be made to the right.

B.

When leading the horse, the exhibitor should walk so that his/her body is even with the horse’s neck and halfway between the head and shoulders.

Move in a brisk manner.

When moving the horse, be sure that the judge gets a clear, unobstructed view of the horse’s action by allowing the horse to move forward freely and in a straight line. 2.

Backing a.

When executing a back, the exhibitor should turn from a leading position to face toward the rear of the horse with the right hand extended across the exhibitor’s body and walk forward beside the horse with the horse moving backward.

B.

The exhibitor should never place themselves directly in front of the horse while backing, but maintain a position to the side of the horse. 3.

Turning a.

All turns greater than 90 degrees should be made to the right.

When initiating a turn to the right the position of the exhibitor is the same as the leading 25 position except that the exhibitor should turn and face toward the horse’s head and have the horse move away from them to the right.

B.

On turns greater than 90 degrees, the ideal turn consists of the horse pivoting on the right hind leg while stepping across and in front of the right the right front leg with the left front leg.

An exhibitor should not be penalized if their horse performs a pivot on the left hind leg, but an exhibitor whose horse performs the pivot correctly should receive more credit.

C.

Pull turns to the left should be 90 degrees or less.

The exhibitor should maintain the same position as in a right hand turn with the body facing the horse, but walk backward while executing the turn. 4.

Stop – The stop should be straight, prompt, smooth and responsive with the horse’s body remaining straight. 5.

Setting-up the horse for inspection.

A.

When setting-up the horse, stand toward the front facing the horse, but not directly in front of the horse and always in a position where you can keep your eye on the judge.

B.

Set-up the horse according to its type, breed and/or use.

Do most of the showing with the lead strap.

The exhibitor should never touch the horse with the hands or feet to assist in the set-up. .

C.

Do not crowd the exhibitor next to you when leading into a side-by-side position.

Do not crowd the exhibitor in front when leading into a head-to-tail position.

D.

When the judge is observing other animals, let yours stand if posed reasonably well.

E.

Be natural.

Over showing, undue fussing, and maneuvering are objectionable.

The Quarter Method of Showing The following suggested guidelines of movement are meant to serve as an illustration of proper movement around the horse while showing in Grooming and Showmanship and are for exhibitor information.

Imaginary lines divide the horse into four equal parts as seen in the figure below. (Note: The horse has been sectioned into four parts numbered I, II, III and IV for ease of identification.) One line runs across the horse just behind the withers.

The other imaginary line runs from head to tail.

When the judge is in I, the exhibitor should be in IV.

As the judge moves to II, the exhibitor should move to I.

When the judge moves to III, the exhibitor moves to IV.

As the judge moves up to IV, the exhibitor returns once more to I.

This method is based on safety as the exhibitor can 26 keep the horse’s hindquarters from swinging toward the judge should the horse become fractious. 6.

Disqualification a.

Loss of control of the horse that endangers the exhibitor, other horses or exhibitors, or the judge.

B.

Knocking over a cone or marker c.

Going off pattern.

Open Trail Open to all primary performance animals.

Clothing and equipment requirements will follow those listed under Western, Hunt and Saddle Seat divisions.

Class 5, 6 and 7 – Open Trail Class 5 – Open Trail Ponies (14.2 hands and under) Class 6 – Open Trail Horses, Junior Rider Class 7 – Open Trail Horses, Senior Rider This class will be judged on the performance of the horse/pony over obstacles, with emphasis on manners, response to the rider and quality of movement.

Credit will be given to horses/ponies negotiating the obstacle with correctness, style and some degree of speed, providing correctness is not sacrificed.

Horses/ponies should receive credit for showing attentiveness to the obstacles and the capability of picking their own way through the course when obstacles warrant it, and willingly responding to the rider’s cues on more difficult obstacles.

Horses/ponies will not be required to work on the rail.

However, the course must be designed to require each horse/pony to show three gaits (walk, jog/trot, lope/canter or gaits appropriate for breed) on a reasonably loose rein or light contact.

Patterns must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

Management when setting the 27 courses should keep in mind that the idea is not to trap and/or trick the exhibitor, or eliminate them by making an obstacle too difficult.

Management and course designers should consider the skill level of the majority of the exhibitors.

All courses are to be constructed with SAFETY in mind so as to prevent accidents.

Enough space must be provided for a horse/pony to jog/trot (about 30 feet) and lope/canter (about 50 feet) for the judges to evaluate these gaits.

If an obstacle/course is disrupted, it shall be reset after each horse has worked.

A course shall consist of 6 to 8 obstacles, with at least 10’ between all but the combined obstacles.

Required Obstacles 1.

Ride over at least four poles/logs- can be placed in a straight line, curved, zigzag.

The space between the logs is to be measured and the horse/pony’s path should be the measuring point (generally designed to be through the center).

The logs/poles should be a type that cannot readily roll.

Spacing for walk-overs, trot-overs and lope-overs should be as follows or increments thereof.

A.

Walk-over – should be 16” to 20” apart for ponies and 20” to 24” for horses.

If elevated, should not be higher than 6” for ponies and 12” for horses.

B.

Jog or trot-over – should be 2’ to 2’6” apart for ponies and 3’to 3’6” apart for horses.

If elevated, should not be higher than 4” for ponies and 8” for horses.

C.

Lope or canter-over – should be 5’to 6’ for ponies and 6’ to 7’ for horses.

No elevated lope/canter-over should be used. 2.

Backing Obstacle – should be a minimum width of 32”, or 34” if elevated.

Objects should not be secured as to make them immovable (no stationary objects such as heavy wooden posts or metal bars).

A.

Back through and around 3 markers (barrels, poles, cones, etc. (Suggested to be placed at 36” apart) B.

Back through L,V,U, straight or similar-shaped obstacles.

May be elevated no more than 12”.

Elevated obstacles should be placed in a cup or notched block so that if hit they can not roll, however if hit hard enough, they may fall.

Height is measured from the ground to the top of the element. 3.

Gate – Use a gate which will not endanger horse/pony or rider.

Rope gates may be used.

If the gate has a metal, plastic or wooden support bar under the opening (which pony/horse walks across) contestants must work the gate moving forward through it 28 Optional Obstacles 1.

Serpentine obstacle – at a walk or jog/trot.

Spacing to be a minimum of 3’ for the walk and 8’ for the jog/trot. 2.

Carrying objects – Carry objects from one part of arena to another – only objects which reasonably might be carried on a trail ride may be used.

Avoid objects that are noisy, which might create a safety hazardous if dropped. 3.

Ride over wooden bridge – Suggested minimum width should be 3’ with a minimum length of 6’.

Height should not exceed 10 inches.

The bridge should be sturdy and safe and negotiated at a walk only. 4.

Put on and/or remove slicker. 5.

Remove and replace material from a mailbox 6.

Sidepass 7.

An obstacle consisting of four logs each 5’ to 6’ long for ponies and 5’ to 7’ for horses laid in a square.

Used for rider to enter and execute a turn and then exit.

Each rider will enter the square over log/pole as designated.

When all four feet are in the square, the rider should execute a turn, as indicated, and depart. 8.

Any other safe and negotiable obstacle which could reasonably be expected to be encountered on a trail ride and meets the approval of the judge may be used. 9.

A combination of two or more of any obstacle is acceptable.

Unacceptable obstacles: 1.

Tires 2.

Animals 3.

Hides 4.

PVC pipe 5.

Dismounting 6.

Jumps (does not include elevated log/poles) 7.

Rocking or moving bridges 8.

Water hazards or water boxes with floating or moving parts 9.

Flames, dry ice, fire extinguisher, etc. 10.

Log/poles elevated in a manner that permits them to roll. 11.

Ground ties 12.

Dragging/pulling any objects 13.

Lime Judging and scoring trail classes: The following scoring system is mandatory for all trail classes.

Scoring will be on the basis of 0-infinity, with 70 denoting an average performance.

Each obstacle will receive an obstacle score that should be added or 29 subtracted from 70.

Each obstacle will be scored on the following basis, ranging from plus 1 ½ to minus 1 ½: -1 ½ =extremely poor, -1=very poor, – ½ = poor, 0= correct, + ½ = good, +1= very good, +1 ½ = excellent.

Obstacle scores are to be determined and assessed independently of penalty points.

An exhibitor who does not complete an obstacle during the course must not place above an exhibitor who has completed all obstacles.

Penalty points will also be assessed at each obstacle as noted below.

Penalties will be assessed per occurrence and a maximum of 9 penalty points will be assessed per obstacle.

Penalty Points -½ point  For each tick of log, pole, cone or obstacle -1 point  Each hit of, bite of or stepping on a log, pole, cone or obstacle  Incorrect gait or break of gait at walk or jog/trot for two strides or less  Incorrect number of strides between poles within an obstacle  Both front or hind feet in a single strided slot or space at a walk or a jog.  Skipping over or failing to step into required space  Failure to meet the correct strides in jog/trot and lope/canter over log obstacles  Split/straddle pole in a lope-over (Defined as a log between the two front or the two hind feet) -3 points  Incorrect gait or break in gait at walk or jog/trot for more than 2 strides  Out of lead or break of gait at lope/canter (except when correcting an incorrect lead)  Knocking down an elevated pole, cone, barrel, plant obstacle or severely disturbing an obstacle  Stepping outside the confines of, falling, or jumping off or out of an obstacle with designated boundaries with only one foot  First refusal, balk, or attempting to evade an obstacle by shying or backing more than 2 strides away  Second refusal -5 points  Failure to follow the correct line of travel between obstacles  Overturns of more than a 1/4 turn 30  Dropping slicker or object required to be carried on course  Letting go of or dropping gate  Use of hand to instill fear  Blatant disobedience (kicking out, bucking, rearing, striking)  Stepping outside the confines of, falling, or jumping off or out of an obstacle with designated boundaries with more than one foot  Holding saddle with either hand -9 points  Failure of rider to begin to negotiate an obstacle within 30 seconds of arrival at the obstacle.

Rider will be asked to move to next obstacle.  If a rider fails to completely negotiate an obstacle in approximately one minute, unless the nature of the obstacle requires a longer time, ie complex back through.

Rider will be asked to move to next obstacle.  Three refusals at an obstacle, regardless of the length of time.

Rider will be asked to move to next obstacle.

Disqualification:  Failure to follow the prescribed order of obstacles, including failure to stay inside the designated boundary markers will result in disqualification  Failure to enter, exit or work obstacle from correct side or direction  Fall to the ground of pony/horse or rider will result in disqualification  No attempt to perform an obstacle  Failure to complete three cumulative obstacles will result in disqualification Failure to complete an obstacle is defined as:  three refusals at an obstacle or  more than 30 seconds to begin negotiating each obstacle or  failure to complete an obstacle in approximately one minute, unless the nature of the obstacle requires longer time, ie complex back through — Sample Walk-Overs (With proper spacing, can also be used for jog-overs or lope-overs). Sample Side Pass Obstacles Sample Side Pass Obstacles 32 Western Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes only: Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail, Western Pleasure, Western Horsemanship, Western Riding, Novice Reining and Driving (Pleasure or Draft).

Clothing and Equipment Requirements: a.

Western pants, western jeans, or western skirt.

B.

Appropriate western attire including long sleeves (that reach approximately to the wrist) and a collar.

If the garment has buttons, snaps, etc.

At the wrist, they must be secured.

Clothing must be neat, workmanlike, and suitable for the class in which the exhibitor is participating.

C.

Boots or shoes that have a definite heel as viewed from the side.

D.

Jacket, vest, or tie (optional).

E.

Chaps are optional.

F.

Western type hat or protective headgear for Grooming and Showmanship classes; protective headgear required in all other classes.

G.

Western type spurs are optional; not to be used forward of cinch.

Emphasis is placed on correct use of spur by exhibitor.

Spurs may be blunt or roweled.

Rowels must move freely and be blunt.

Equipment: a.

Western saddle with a horn: Australian saddle may not be used.

B.

Rope for saddle (optional).

C.

Western type bridle.

D.

If a romal is used, hobbles are optional and must be attached to the saddle.

E.

Safety stirrups are permitted.

A tapadero or covered stirrup in which a rider’s toe may beco me entrapped is not considered a safety stirrup and is not permitted.

Prohibited Clothing and Equipment: a.

Slip on spurs not attached with a spur strap b.

T-shirt, tank tops, and halter tops c.

Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages of any type except as noted in Novice Reining class.

D.

Martingales and draw reins e.

Nosebands, cavessons and tie-downs f.

Mechanical hackamores g.

Whips or bats Bits that are permitted by respective breed associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

A judge at his/her discretion can penalize a horse with non-conventional types of bits.

Horses five years old and younger may be shown with either a bit, hackamore or a snaffle bit.

If a hackamore or snaffle bit is used, the horse may be ridden with one or two hands. 33 Mechanical hackamores are prohibited in this division.

Refer to glossary for definition of bits and Performance Rules 26-31.

For additional information, refer to Guidelines for Bits in Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Shows available from county extension offices or the PA 4-H Horse Program website.

When using both hands on the reins of a snaffle bit or hackamore, the reins must be bridged such that both reins are held in both hands at all times and the tails of the reins are crossed on the opposite side of the neck.

The rider’s hands should be carried near the pommel and not further than four inches out on either side of the saddle horn.

Rider’s hands must be steady with very limited movement.

Horses six years old and older must be shown with a shanked bit, and only one hand is to be used for reining regardless of type of bit used and hands shall not be changed, except where permitted in Trail and Novice Reining.

Hand is to be around reins.

When split reins are used, one finger is permitted between reins.

When using a romal, no finger is allowed between reins.

Rider can hold romal with hand not used for reining, provided it is held approximately sixteen inches from the reining hand.

Two handing reins, a finger between romal reins, or more than one finger between split reins will result in a disqualification.

If a curb strap or chain is used, it must lay flat, be at least one-half inch wide and permit the entry of two fingers between curb strap or chain and the horse’s chin.

Classes 8 and 9 – Western Horsemanship Class 8 – Western Horsemanship, Jr.

Division Class 9 – Western Horsemanship, Sr.

Division The Western Horsemanship class is designed to evaluate the rider’s ability to execute with their horse, a set of maneuvers prescribed by the judge with precision and smoothness while exhibiting poise, confidence, and maintaining a balanced, functional and fundamentally correct body position.

The ideal horsemanship pattern is extremely precise with the rider and horse working in complete unison, executing each maneuver with subtle aids and cues.

Patterns must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

Riders will also demonstrate their ability to work correctly and competently with a group, on the rail both directions at all three gaits.

Position of Rider The rider should appear natural in the seat and ride with a balanced, functional and correct position regardless of the maneuver or gait being performed. 34 Stiff or artificial body position will be penalized.

The rider should sit in the center of the saddle with the legs hanging to form a straight line from the ear, through the shoulder and hip, to the ankle.

The heels should be lower than the toes with a slight bend at the knee.

The rider’s back should be flat, relaxed and supple.

During the rail work and pattern, the exhibitor should have strong, secure and proper position.

When showing horses 6 yrs of age and over only one hand shall be used for reining and the hand shall not be changed.

When riding horses five years and younger with a hackamore or snaffle bit, riding with two hands, with the reins bridged is permissible and correct.

When split reins are used, one finger between the reins is permitted, and the bight of reins should be carried on the same side as the reining hand.

If a romal is used, the rider’s hand shall be around the reins and no fingers between the reins are allowed.

The tail of the romal shall be in the hand opposite from the reining hand.

Reins are to be carried immediately above or slightly in front of the saddle horn.

Reins should be carried so as to have light contact with the horse’s mouth.

Excessively tight or loose reins will be penalized.

Wrists are to be kept straight and relaxed with thumb on top and fingers closed around the reins.

Some movement of the arm is permissible, but excessive pumping will be penalized.

Class Procedure All riders must enter the ring and then work individually, or each exhibitor may be worked from the gate individually.

When riders are worked individually from the gate, a working order is required.

Riders should be instructed to either leave the arena, fall into line, or fall into place on the rail after their work.

Following individual patterns, the entire class must work at all three gaits both directions of the arena with the reverse executed away from the rail.

The following maneuvers are acceptable in a pattern:  walk, jog, trot, extended trot, lope or extended lope in a straight line, curved line, serpentine, circle or figure 8, square, or combination of these gaits and maneuvers  stop  back in a straight or curved line  turn or pivot, including spins and rollbacks on the haunches and/or on the forehand  sidepass 35  simple change of lead  option of simple or flying change of lead  counter canter Judges may not ask exhibitors to mount or dismount.

Performance The exhibitor should perform the work accurately, precisely, smoothly, and with a reasonable amount of promptness.

Exhibitors that perform the pattern sluggishly and allow their horse to move without adequate impulsion, collection or cadence will be penalized.

The horse should perform all maneuvers in the pattern willingly, briskly and readily with minimal visible or audible cueing.

Severe disobedience will not result in a disqualification, but should be severely penalized, and the exhibitor should not place above an exhibitor that completes the pattern correctly.

Failure to follow the prescribed pattern, knocking over or working on the wrong side of the cones, excessive schooling or training, or willful abuse by the exhibitor is cause for disqualification.

Classes 10, 11, 12 and 13 – Western Pleasure Class 10 – Western Pleasure Ponies (13 hands and under) Class 11 – Western Pleasure Ponies (over 13 hands and not over 14.2 hands) Class 12 – Western Pleasure Horses, Junior Rider Class 13 – Western Pleasure Horses, Senior Rider In all pleasure classes, the judge should place the emphasis on manners, performance, conformation, and soundness; and on neatness and cleanliness of horse, tack, and rider.

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds normally used for pleasure.

Contestants will work both ways of the ring at a walk, jog, and a lope but shall not be asked to hand gallop or extend the lope.

Horses should be shown on a reasonably loose rein or light contact, without undue restraint.

Horses may be asked to back.

Horses to be shown with Western tack.

Martingales (tie-downs) and nosebands are not permitted.

Use of spurs is optional; however, the rowels must be blunt and turn freely.

A true pleasure horse is light mouthed and ridden with a reasonably loose (but not sloppy) rein.

It must be easy to handle, smooth-gaited, and not show undesirable mannerisms.

Class 14 – Western Riding The scoring system outlined below must be followed and minimum scores must be attained before a 4-H member can advance through the 36 qualifying system.

Participants in Western Riding must have a minimum score of 55 to be considered for advancement to the district show and a minimum score of 58 to be considered for advancement to the state show.

The quota system determining the number of participants from each district to advance to the state level will also apply.

In no case will more than the maximum quota be permitted to advance to the next level regardless of their score. (a) Western Riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the lope, response to the rider, manners, and disposition.

The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving. (b) Credit shall be given for and emphasis placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits (ie, starting and finishing pattern with the same cadence), and the horse’s ability to change leads precisely, easily, and simultaneously both hind and front at the center point between markers.

In order to have balance, with quality lead changes, the horse’s head and neck should be in a relaxed, natural position, with his poll level with or slightly above the level of the withers.

He should not carry his head behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.

The horse should have a relaxed head carriage showing response to the rider’s hands, with a moderate flexion at the poll.

Horses may be ridden with light contact or on a reasonably loose rein.

The horse should cross the log both at the jog and the lope without breaking gait or radically changing stride. (c) The judge and show committee will select one of the two patterns to be performed.

The judge is responsible for the pattern being correctly set. (d) On the pattern: (1)The small circles represent pylon markers which are recommended.

These should be separated by a uniform measured distance of not less than 30 feet (9 meters) nor more than 50 feet (15 meters) on the sides with 5 markers (see diagram).

In pattern one, the three markers on the opposite side should be set adjacent to the appropriate markers.

It is recommended that markers be set a minimum of 15 feet (4 1/2 meters) from the fence and with 50 to 80 foot (15 to 24 meters) width in the pattern, as the arena permits. (2) A solid log or pole should be used and be a minimum of 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length. (3) The long serpentine line indicates the direction of travel and gaits at which the horse is to move.

The shaded area represents the lead changing 37 area between the markers.

The dotted line (…) indicates walk, the dash line (- – -) jog, and the solid line ( – ) lope. (e) Scoring will be on a basis of 0-100 with 70 denoting an average performance.

Scoring guidelines to be considered: points will be added or subtracted from the maneuvers on the following basis, ranging from plus 1.5 to minus 1.5: -1.5 extremely poor, -1 very poor, – .5 poor, 0 average, +.5 good, +1 very good, +1.5 excellent.

Maneuver scores are to be determined independently of penalty points. (f) A contestant shall be penalized each time the following occur: Five (5) points (1) Out of lead beyond the next designated change area (note: failures to change, including crosscantering.

Two consecutive failures to change would result in two five (5) point penalties). (2) blatant disobedience including kicking out, biting, bucking, and rearing (3) Holding saddle with either hand Three (3) points (1) not performing the specific gait (jog or lope) or not stopping when called for in the pattern, within 10 feet (3 meters) of the designated area (2) simple change of leads (3) out of lead at or before the marker prior to the designated change area or out of lead at or after the marker after the designated change area (4) additional lead changes anywhere in pattern (except when correcting an extra change or incorrect lead) (5) in pattern one failure to start the lope within 30 feet (9 meters) after crossing the log at the jog (6) break of gait at walk or jog for more than two strides (7) break of gait at the lope One (1) point (1) hitting or rolling log (2) out of lead more than one stride either side of the center point and between the markers (3) splitting the log (log between the two front or two hind feet) at the lope (4) break of gait at the walk or jog up to two (2) strides — This is a timed event using three barrels set in a triangular pattern.

Metals barrels and protective barrel covers are required.

The distance from the arena walls/fence must be a minimum of 18 feet from the first and second barrels and a minimum of 36 feet from the third barrel to the end of the arena.

A distance of 30 yards between the first and second barrels and 35 yards between the second and third and third and first barrels is required with the following exception: If the arena space does not permit regulation distances, the distance between barrels may be reduced in 5 yard increments.

The timer should be set 20 yards from the line intersecting the first and second barrels.

It is recommended that there be at least 45 ft.

From the starting line to the end of the arena.

Horses cross the starting line with a running start and proceed to the first barrel on the right, circle it from the left side and proceed to the barrel directly across from it, circle it from the right side, and proceed to the end barrel and circle it from the right side, then run with speed to the finish line.

Knocking over a barrel incurs a three second penalty per knockdown.

Crossing the finish line before the end of the course shall cause disqualification.

The pattern may be run reversed. BARREL RACE PATTERN 50 Class 22, 23 and 24 – Raised Box Keyhole Class 22 – Raised Box Keyhole Ponies (14.2 hands and under) Class 23 – Raised Box Keyhole Horses Junior Rider Class 24 – Raised Box Keyhole Horses Senior Rider This is a timed event.

Horses cross the starting line with a running start and proceed to the raised box keyhole located at the opposite end of the arena.

The exhibitor shall enter the keyhole between the center two entry/exit cones.

Inside the raised box keyhole the exhibitor must turn his horse 180 and exit through the same two entry/exit cones.

A three second penalty will be assessed if either of the two required entrance cones are knocked over (both cones – 6 seconds).

A cone that is knocked down and rights itself again is not considered a knockdown.

Elimination will result if any remaining portion of the keyhole is knocked over The raised box keyhole shall be located 40 yards (120 ft) from the starting line.

If space is limited, a shorter distance may be used.

The keyhole shall consist of eight cones with PVC plastic pipe or wooden boards of sufficient cross-section (that will not splinter) placed on top of the cone to form the sides and back of the box.

The box shall be 12 ft x 12 ft, with 4 ft between the entry/exit cones, as measured from the base edge of each cone.

Two additional cones shall be placed across the front of the box, one to each side of the 4 foot opening.

It is strongly recommended to use 28 inch traffic cones.

RAISED BOX KEYHOLE PATTERN 51 Saddle Seat Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes only: Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail, Saddle Seat Pleasure, Saddle Seat Equitation and Driving (Pleasure or Draft).

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds and typically includes those used for Saddle Seat.

The Pennsylvania 4-H horse program may include diverse breeds and types in this division.

Although there are many types of clothing and equipment acceptable for different breeds and types, the following requirements apply for 4-H shows.

Clothing and equipment requirements: a.

Jodhpur pants or skirt b.

Jodhpur boots c.

Shirt and tie d.

Coat e.

Protective headgear is required in all classes except Grooming and Showmanship; derby, top hat or hat appropriate for breed/type is optional in Grooming and Showmanship.

F.

In equitation classes informal (anytime of day or night ), conservative colors are suggested including black, blue, gray, dark green, beige or brown, in herringbone, pinstripe, or solid colors.

Coat and jodhpur pants should be of same color.

Day coats are not recommended in equitation classes.

G.

Optional formal wear is only allowed after 6:00 pm, and consists of conservative colors such as dark gray, dark brown, dark blue, or black tuxedo jacket with collar and lapels of same color with matching jodhpurs, tuxedo shirt, bow tie, and gloves.

H.

In pleasure classes, a day coat or coat of contrasting color to the jodhpurs may be worn.

Informal matching equitation suit is also acceptable in pleasure classes.

Equipment: a.

Flat, English type saddle b.

Full bridle, single curb, or pelham c.

Bits that are permitted by respective breed associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

A judge at his/her discretion can penalize a horse with non-conventional types of bits or nose bands.

D.

Whips and spurs without rowels are optional.

Slip on spurs, not attached with a spur strap, are not permitted.

E.

Martingales, tie downs, and ankle chains are prohibited. 52 Saddle Seat Equitation This class is open to both trotting and non-trotting breeds/types.

The rider’s performance and skills are being judged in this class.

The rider’s basic position, use of hands and legs, and their ability to control and show their horses are important.

The horse’s and the rider’s performance and execution, must be considered.

Rider should maintain a seat that is thoroughly efficient and in balance with the horse for riding at any gait and for any length of time.

The rider should have the mount under control and demonstrate his or her horsemanship ability at all times.

Any excessive motion in the saddle or swinging of the arms and legs should be penalized.

An artificial or unnatural appearance in the saddle also should be penalized.

If applicable, the rider should be on the correct diagonal at the trot.

The horse should be on the proper lead at the canter.

Ring generalship must be taken into consideration by the judge.

A complete picture of the whole is of major importance.

Hands should be held in an easy position, neither perpendicular nor horizontal to the saddle.

The method of holding the reins is optional, however, both hands must be used, and reins must be picked up at one time.

Bight of reins should be on off side.

Riders may be asked to back their horse.

Basic Position – To obtain the proper position, the rider should place his or herself comfortably in the saddle and find their center of gravity by sitting with a slight bend at the knees without use of irons.

While in this position, adjust leathers to fit.

Irons should be placed under ball of foot with even pressure on entire width of sole and center of iron.

Foot position should be natural.

Riders of breeds of horses that do not have a natural trot are not required to meet the diagonal requirements.

Classes 25 and 26—Saddle Seat Equitation Class 25 – Saddle Seat Equitation, Junior Division Class 26- Saddle Seat Equitation, Senior Division Rider will enter the ring to the right at the trot or easiest gait and proceed counter-clockwise.

Rider will show horse at a walk, trot (or easiest gait), and canter, both ways of the ring.

All riders will be required to perform an individual test/pattern that the judge feels will demonstrate the rider’s ability.

Patterns or tests must be posted at least one hour prior to the class. Tests will include one or more of the following skills: Address the reins only in the lineup. In the lineup, disengage and engage feet from stirrups. Circle at a trot or easiest gait. 53 Ride without stirrups for a brief period of time, no more than 1 minute.

Riders may be asked to disengage or engage stirrups at any gait. If appropriate for all riders in the class – change of diagonals down center of ring or on the rail Serpentine at a trot or easiest gait.

A series of left and right half-circles with correct diagonals (if appropriate) must be shown. Back for no more than eight steps. Figure-eight at a trot or easiest gait demonstrating change of diagonals, if appropriate. Circle at the canter on the correct lead. Serpentine at a canter on correct lead demonstrating a simple change of lead. Figure-eight at canter on a correct lead demonstrating simple change of lead. Change leads down center of ring or on the rail demonstrating simple change of lead.

The judge must specify the beginning lead and subsequent lead changes to be performed.

Classes 27 and 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure Classes Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non Trotting These classes will be judged on manners, consistency, way of going, performance, and soundness.

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds normally used for Saddle Seat Pleasure.

Saddle Seat Pleasure classes will be divided into trotting and non trotting breeds/types.

A horse or pony may be shown in only one Saddle Seat Pleasure class.

Horses and ponies will compete in the same class.

Junior and Senior riders will compete in the same classes.

Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting This pleasure class is designated for trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; American Saddlebreds, Arabians, Morgans, etc.

Horses to be shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring.

Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non-Trotting This class is designated for non-trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; Tennessee Walking Horses, racking horses, Paso Finos, etc.

Horses will be required to perform gaits appropriate to their respective breed/types.

Horses to be shown at a walk, easiest gait or breed appropriate gait, and canter both ways of the ring.

Horses and ponies will show at their breed standard equivalent of the trot, including, but not limited to; running walk, single foot, rack, quarto, etc., with none being more desirable than the other as long as it is being performed naturally and consistently. 54 Hunt Seat Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes; Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail, Hunter Under Saddle, Hunter Hack and Driving (Pleasure or Draft).

In addition, Exhibitors may show in one equitation class (Equitation on the Flat or Over Fences) and one Working Hunter Class (Low Working or Working Hunter).

Exhibitors showing Low Working Hunter may not show in Equitation Over Fences.

Clothing and equipment requirements: a.

Riding breeches, jodhpurs or skirt b.

Hunt boots or jodhpur boots c.

Shirt or ratcatcher shirt d.

Tie or choker e.

Riding coat f.

Hunt cap or protective headgear for Grooming and Showmanship classes; protective headgear required in all other classes.

Equipment: a.

Hunt or forward seat saddle.

B.

Snaffles, pelhams, kimberwickes and full bridles, all with cavesson nose bands, are recommended.

C.

Bits that are permitted by respective breed associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

A judge at his/her own discretion can penalize a horse with non-conventional types of bits, bridles or nosebands.

Drop nosebands, flash nosebands, bitless bridles, etc., are considered nonconventional.

D.

Standing martingales are optional in Working Hunter Classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Whips and crops are optional.

Regular hunting spurs without rowels are optional.

F.

In equitation classes, protective boots or conservative colored bandages are permitted.

In Low/Working Hunter and Hunter Hack classes in inclement weather, the Show Committee or Judge may permit the use of bell boots only.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

Prohibited Clothing and Equipment: a.

Slip on spurs not attached with a spur strap b.

Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages except as noted in item f above.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

C.

Draw reins d.

Martingales are prohibited, Exception: Standing martingales are permitted in Working Hunter classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Mechanical hackamores f.

Whips or bats exceeding 30 inches in length 55 — 77 -9 points  Failure of handler to begin to negotiate an obstacle within 30 seconds of arrival at the obstacle.

Rider will be asked to move to next obstacle.  If a handler fails to completely negotiate an obstacle in approximately one minute, unless the nature of the obstacle requires a longer time, ie complex  back through.

Handler will be asked to move to next obstacle.  Three refusals at an obstacle, regardless of the length of time.

Handler will be asked to move to next obstacle.

Disqualification:  Baiting an animal to perform and obstacle  Failure to follow the prescribed order of obstacles, including failure to stay inside the designated boundary markers will result in disqualification  Failure to enter, exit or work obstacle from correct side or direction  Fall to the ground of horse and/or handler  No attempt to perform an obstacle  Failure to complete three cumulative obstacles will result in disqualification Failure to complete an obstacle is defined as:  three refusals at an obstacle or  more than 30 seconds to begin negotiating each obstacle or  failure to complete an obstacle in approximately one minute, unless the nature of the obstacle requires longer time, ie complex back through 78 Therapeutic Riding Division This division is intended primarily for riders with disabilities who are unable to participate in other divisions with or without reasonable accommodations.

Exhibitors in this division may also participate in Grooming and Showmanship.

Penn State encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities.

If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact your county extension educator in advance of your participation or visit.

Requests for accommodations should be made to the county extension educator at least three weeks in advance of the event.

Classes included in this division are divided into two subdivisions: maximum assistance and minimum assistance.

Parent or guardian is responsible to consult with their child’s health care professional to determine the appropriate level of assistance.

Riders should be placed in the class that is most appropriate for their ability.

Maximum assistance – riders in this division are required to have two or more aides (leader and 1 or 2 side walkers).

Minimum assistance – riders in this division are those riders who only require one aide (leader or side walker).

General Rules Participants in this division (Classes 46-49): a.

Will not participate in any other classes, with the exception of classes 1, 2, 3, and 4.

B.

Exhibitors in this division are not required to own or lease a horse, and their project animal may be shared.

Youth must designate and enroll their project animal by June 1 and meet all enrollment requirements as outlined in the General Rules in order to show that year.

Exhibitors are required to use the same project animal at county, district and state shows.

See exceptions below: c.

Are exempt from the management and ownership of project animal (General Rules 10 & 13) d.

Are exempt from performance rule 6.

E.

Will submit Therapeutic Riding Division Form (TRD 1), Medical History Form (TRD 2) and Registration and Release Form (TRD 3).

Forms available from county extension office.

F.

Will in no way be attached to their saddle or mount by straps, belts, etc.

G.

Must wear protective headgear. (See General Rule 25) 79 h.

Will have at least one aide (leader or side walker), that is familiar and has worked with the rider.

All aides must be 14 years of age or older.

The aide must assist the rider during mounting and dismounting.

No more than three aides may assist the rider in the class.

Aides may, if needed, communicate verbally with the rider, but any physical assistance in guiding or controlling the horse will be penalized, except in the case of emergency.

Special consideration will be given according to individual disabilities.

The degree of assistance provided by the leader/aide(s) will vary and is dependent on the ability of the rider.

I.

The size and temperament of the horse should be appropriate for the rider.

The size and ability of the side walker(s) and aide(s) should be appropriate to assist both the rider and horse.

J.

May not participate if they have any contraindications for participating in PA 4-H horse activities.

Parent or guardian is responsible for consulting their child’s health care professional(s) to determine if there are contraindications for participation in 4-H horse activities.

Additional information on contraindications for horse activities may be obtained from North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) at www.narha.org or 1-800-369-RIDE or PA Council on Therapeutic Horsemanship (PACTH) at www.pacth.org Unauthorized assistance in the ring will be cause for the rider to be penalized.

Clothing and Equipment Requirements: a.

Riders may use English or Western tack and attire.

Clothing and equipment should be the same as English and Western divisions except as noted below; reasonable accommodations are acceptable.

Jeans or other long pants and hard soled shoes or boots are acceptable.

Attire will be neat.

Aides should be dressed in workmanlike attire; long pants or skirts, shirts with sleeves.

Appropriate footwear is noted below.

B.

Tank tops, halter tops, or soft soled shoes are not permitted for riders, horse leaders or side aides.

C.

Sneakers or other soft soled shoes may be worn only with written permission of a physician.

D.

Tack: Style of tack is optional.

Tack and equipment must be appropriate for the seat and class entered.

Mechanical hackamores are prohibited.

Halter and bridle, halter/bridle combination or bridle with snaffle bit and leading Y are required on all horses; (Exception: Non-mechanical hackamores or bosals are permitted on horses 5 years of age and under.).

A lead rope is required and may or may not 80 be attached to the horse, depending upon ability of the rider.

Attached lead ropes will not be penalized.

If a halter and bridle are used and the lead rope is attached, the lead rope must be attached to the halter; (Exception: A leading Y is permitted with a snaffle bit only.).

If a special type of bridle and/or bit is necessary due to an individual disability, a request for an accommodation should be made to the county extension educator.

Tack should be appropriate for the rider’s size and ability, and properly fitted to the horse and rider.

Riders should ride with feet in stirrups unless unable to do so due to their condition.

Adaptive equipment may be used, but in no way may the rider be attached to the horse or saddle.

Safety stirrups are advised.

Safety handles should be used on all English saddles.

E.

Spurs are discouraged and should only be used as adaptive equipment if appropriate for horse and rider.

Classes 51 and 52 – Obstacle Trail: Class 51 — Obstacle Trail, Maximum Assistance Class 52 — Obstacle Trail, Minimum Assistance Course designers must consider safety first at all times and are encouraged to design courses that will demonstrate proper horse handling techniques and horsemanship skills for riders with disabilities.

Refer to Guidelines for PA 4-H Obstacle Trail (Therapeutic Division) publication for suggested obstacle trail courses. (available in county extension offices or the PA 4-H Horse Program website) Courses must be posted at the beginning of the show and a copy should be made available to all entrants.

Handling or dragging of obstacles and mounting and dismounting WILL NOT be permitted in this class.

Management is encouraged to design elements that can be negotiated within 90 seconds.

Entries must be accompanied by at least one and not more than three aides. (If one aide is used he/she must remain in close proximity to the horse.) RIDER MUST GUIDE MOUNT THROUGH A PREPOSTED COURSE.

RIDERS MAY “WALK” (without their mounts) THE COURSE IF NEEDED, PRIOR TO START OF CLASS.

RIDERS WILL BE ASKED TO TROT OR JOG AT SOME PLACE IN THE PATTERN.

To be shown at a walk and sitting or posting trot or jog or alternate gait at the appropriate and indicated parts of the course.

Each time a rider receives unauthorized assistance from a side-walker, horse leader or spotter a penalty will be incurred. 81 Each obstacle not negotiated properly will result in penalty points.

Riders must execute the course as posted.

A minimum of five and maximum of seven obstacles will be used.

Course distances and obstacle recommendations: Refer to guidelines for Obstacle Trail for suggested course distances, recommendations and other course details. 1. 20 to 36 ft.

From starting/ending point to first/last obstacle 2.

Figure 8 with two 25 ft.

Diameter circles: MUST be done at the walk; must circle right then left.

Boundaries of the figure 8 (middle and outer edges) must be clearly defined with lines or cones. 3.

Figure 8 around two barrels – barrels must be 14 ft.

Apart.

Start to right of first barrel. 4.

Walk-overs – 4 natural or white rails (10 ft.

Long) placed at no less than 24 in.

Apart. 5.

Zig-Zag – Guide the horse through a “Z” of ground poles at the walk.

Rails must be at least 6′ ft.

Apart. 6.

Pass between two bales of hay, 6 ft.

Apart. 7.

At least 20 to 30 ft.

Between obstacles when jog/trot or alternate gait is used. 8.

Serpentine at least 5 cones or barrels (obstacles must be 10 ft.

Apart). 9. 360 Box – Turning the mount around in a prescribed circle or box (may be combined with stepping over poles if poles are used to make the box – this would count as two obstacles).

Box should be 10 ft.

Square. 10.

Halt at any prescribed location on the course.

Classes 53 and 54 – Walk Trot Equitation Class 53 – Walk Trot Equitation, Maximum Assistance Class 54 – Walk Trot Equitation, Minimum Assistance Equitation will be judged on the position of the rider, balance, use of the natural aids, and control of the mount.

Particular attention will be paid to the rider’s ability to safely and independently control the horse.

Leaders and sidewalkers are reminded that their position is one of safety – too much unnecessary assistance will be penalized by the judge.

Must be accompanied by one aide (may be accompanied by a leader and two sidewalkers).

Will be asked to perform at the walk: circle, halt, and reverse; and at the trot, sitting or posting (unless medically contraindicated). 82 GLOSSARY 1. 4-H Member Age Divisions: Junior Division – member who has not reached his 14th birthday by January 1st of the current year.

Senior Division – member 14 years old or over by January 1st of the current year.

Age on January 1st of current year determines Grooming and Showmanship class. 2.

Whenever this rulebook refers to June 1 the following applies: When June 1 falls on a business day, enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business.

If June 1 falls on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, then enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business on the next business day. 3.

A rider is considered to have fallen when he or she is separated from the horse that has not fallen, in such a way as to necessitate remounting or vaulting into the saddle.

A horse is considered to have fallen when the shoulder and haunch on the same side have touched the ground or an obstacle and the ground. 4.

Height of horses and ponies is based upon vertical distance from the ground to the top of withers on an unshod basis.

Adjustments should be based on thickness of shoe at heel on front shoes at the time the horse is measured. 5. “Time out”, a period of up to 7 minutes, to be called in the event of a horse casting a shoe or breakage of equipment while in the ring.

No animal shall be permitted more than one such time out per class.

This rule applies in all Saddle Seat and Driving classes only.

Show stewards are responsible for keeping track of time outs. 6.

Whenever this book refers to a Hackamore in the Western performance classes, other than Contest Classes, it means the use only of a flexible, braided rawhide or leather or rope bosal, the core of which may be either rawhide or flexible metal cable.

Absolutely no rigid materials will be permitted under the jaw, regardless of how padded or covered.

This description DOES NOT refer to a so-called mechanical hackamore. 7.

Whenever this book refers to a snaffle bit in Western performance classes, it means the use of a smooth snaffle bit with a broken mouthpiece and no twist (conventional Oring, egg-butt, or D-ring).

An optional loose chin strap may be used (leather or nylon only).

Reins to be attached above the chin strap. 8.

Whenever this book refers to a bit in Western performance classes, it means the use of a curb bit that has a solid or broken mouthpiece, has shanks and acts with leverage. 9.

A turnout is defined as a combination of horse, vehicle, and driver. 10.

Immediate family is defined as: parent, brother, sister, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, grandparents, and bona fide foster parents and/or legal guardians. 83 Good Housekeeping Award A good housekeeping awards program will be held during the State 4-H Horse Show.

Judging will be done on a county basis with a winning county selected in each district daily.

An overall grand champion, reserve champion and third place will be selected for the show from the daily county winners.

Scoring System Stall Card/Emergency Information—25 points – Neat and visible – Includes member’s name – Includes horse’s name – Includes county name – Includes emergency notification information Clean and Tidy Appearance—25 points – Aisle free of hay and tack – Aisle neatly swept – Stalls clean and bedded – Horses clean and well-groomed – Tack stalls neat and clean Hospitality and Overall Presentation—25 points – Atmosphere friendly and welcoming – Overall appearance neat, uniform, and attractive – Rules for decorating followed – Visitors’ questions answered courteously and accurately – Exhibitors/others friendly and interacting cooperatively TOTAL – 75 POSSIBLE POINTS 84 — CHARACTER COUNTS! Is a service mark of the CHARACTER COUNTS Coalition, a project of the Josephson Institute of Ethics. 85 Pennsylvania 4-H Member Code of Conduct 4-H members participating in or attending club, county, regional, district, state, and national programs, activities, events, shows, and contests sponsored for youth by the 4-H Youth Development Program of Penn State Cooperative Extension are required to conduct themselves according to the Pennsylvania 4-H Code of Conduct and the Code of Conduct, rules, policies, and regulations for each specific 4-H activity.

The code operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania 4-H Youth Development Program Behavioral Expectations and the rules and regulations of the specific activity.

Adults attending or participating in 4-H youth activities are expected to conduct themselves according to the code and to assist and support youth in their efforts to adhere to the code.

The following are not permitted at 4-H sponsored programs, activities, or events: • Possession, consumption or distribution of alcohol. • Possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs. • Possession or use of all tobacco products. • Sexual activity. • Sexual harassment. • Boys in girls’ rooms and girls in boys’ rooms or lodging areas. • Cheating or misrepresenting project work. • Theft, destruction, or abuse of property. • Violation of an established curfew. • Unauthorized absence from program site. • Physical, verbal, emotional, or mental abuse including hazing of another person. • Possession or use of a weapon.* • Possession or use of a harmful object with the intent to hurt or intimidate others. • Other conduct deemed inappropriate for the youth development program by an event chair; a designated Penn State extension educator, faculty, or staff member; or a 4-H volunteer leader. • Public displays of affection are not appropriate. • Possession or use of fireworks.

Youth attending 4-H events on the University Park campus must abide by all University regulations.

While attending and participating in an on campus event, the operation of a motor vehicle is prohibited.

Parking of vehicles must be in accordance with University parking regulations.

Misuse or damage of University property is unacceptable.

Charges will be assessed against those participants who are responsible for damages or misusing University property.

The 4-H name and emblem is to be used appropriately at all times, including use on personal and public web sites.

Use of the 4-H name and emblem implies representation of the 4-H Youth Development Program.

For information and guidelines on appropriate use of the 4-H name and emblem, go to the following web site: http://www.national4-hheadquarters.gov/emblem/4h name.htm If the code is violated, the following steps may be taken: • The adult chaperone for the youth involved in the violation (extension educator or 4-H leader) will be made aware of the situation. • The parent(s) may be called and arrangements made for transportation home at the parent’s expense. • The 4-H’er(s) may be barred from participating in 4-H. • When a violation occurs at a competitive event, 4 -H members may be disqualified from the contest and be ineligible for any awards.competition in later contests may also be barred.

This will be determined by the event chair; a designated Penn State extension educator, faculty, or staff member; or a 4-H volunteer leader.

Disqualification of an individual may impact participation of an entire team. • If any laws are violated, the case may be referred to the police. • All chaperones are responsible for all youth at an event. *This does not refer to the equipment used in authorized shooting sports practice or competition. 86 Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Statement of Position on Animal Welfare Pennsylvania 4-H horse programs support humane treatment of all equine and are committed to the following principles: 1.

Advocating and upholding the welfare of all equine, as a primary concern in all activities of the 4-H horse program. 2.

Requiring that all equine be treated humanely, with respect and compassion, and not be mistreated by participants of the 4-H horse program.

Participants include 4-H members, exhibitors, parents or guardians of 4-H members or exhibitors, coaches, trainers, instructors, or other persons acting on behalf of 4-H members or exhibitors. 3.

Promoting responsible care in the handling, treatment, and transportation of all equine. 4.

Providing for the continuous well-being of all equine by recommending routine inspections and consultations with health care specialists, competition officials, and other equine professionals to assure the highest standards of safety, comfort, sanitation, health, and nutrition. 5.

Promoting continuing education in care, management, handling, training, and horsemanship activities, including new technology and developments within the equine industry. 6.

Requiring that all Pennsylvania 4-H horse program members follow the rules as stated in the current Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Show Rule Book and 4-H/Youth Development Policy and Resource Manual, and operating within these regulations in all 4-H equine related activities. 7.

Developing, reviewing, and revising rules for equine activities within the 4-H horse program to ensure the health, welfare, and safety of all equine.

The standard thresholds for cruel conduct or inhumane treatment are those that a veterinarian or any reasonable person experienced and informed in equine training, handling, management, and exhibiting procedures would use to determine the presence of abuse, neglect, or deprivation.

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