Livery Stable : Cologne was clerking at the Warrenton House the popular hotel….

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Equestrian Concierge Shampoo Horses-store.comLivery Stable : Cologne was clerking at the Warrenton House the popular hotel….

Saturday, April 26, 1851. Henley, Bernard J. (Bernard John) 560 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 212. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 151 The Men Sketches, Stories, & Letters: “Shortly after the war E.

M.

Cologne was clerking at the Warrenton House, the popular hotel that stood on the site now occupied by Gallaway’s livery stable.”561 See Stories Chapter. “Cologne was himself an expert auctioneer.”562 See Stories Chapter.

CSR: “Edward M.

Cologne”; 5’4”, light complexion, dark hair, blue eyes; enlisted 20 October 1862; 19 years old; paroled 1 May 1865 Winchester.

Additional Information: Private.563 Resided in Columbia, South Carolina, 1870s.564 K Edw.

M.

Cologne. “Edward M.

Cologne, son of Edgar N.

And Susan T. (Cash) Cologne, aged 22 years.

Enlisted 20 October 1862 in the Black Horse Cavalry…”565 [This cites above.] [‘Above’ as of 12-13-04 was CSR, V, and K.] “Warrenton, Virginia, Sixty Years Ago (1854).

When the writer of these notes came to our village August 1, 1854, … E, N.

Cologne, Town Sergeant and saddler, had his shop where the Foleys live. … Edgar N.

Cologne lived in the late John Ross dwelling, said to have been with the George E.

Yeatman home, the two oldest buildings in the village.”566 “E.

N.

Cologne was sergeant of the 561Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 97–98.+ 562 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 153. 563 Godfrey, “Company H Database Report,” 7 December 2005. 564 “Roster of the Black Horse Cavalry, circa 1874–1878.” 565 Welton, p. 174. 566 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 86, 91, 95. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 152 The Men town with power to collect money as constable. … Cologne was himself an expert auctioneer, … .”567 James Franklin Cook Y M N V K Photo: Born: Marriage: Died: Obituary: Children: Parents and Siblings: Other Family: Sketches, Stories, & Letters: CSR: Engineer; enlisted 25 April 1861; scout for Genl.

Wickham; wounded Stephensburg 11 October 1863, Chimborazo Hospital 10 November 1863; lost right leg; took Oath 2 August 1865 Salem; from Charlottesville.

Additional Information: Y Lost leg at Raccoon Ford.

Lost a leg at Stephensburg, Oct. 8, 1863. 568 # Check Charlottesville records. 567 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 153. 568 “Roster of the Black Horse Cavalry, circa 1874–1878.” Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 — The Men 1864 Beaver Dam; paroled 5 May 1865 Fairfax Courthouse; from New Baltimore.

Additional Information: Wounded at Beaver Dam Station, 1864.

Resided in New Baltimore, Fauquier County.830 One George C.

Florance, 19 April 1833–22 October 1901, Private, buried at Warrenton Cemetery.831 Robert C.

Florence Y M R K Photo: Born: Marriage: Died: Buried Warrenton Cem; marker (no dates) says: Robert G.

Florence, Co.

H., 4th Va.

Cav.832 Obituary: Children: Parents and Siblings: 830 “Roster of the Black Horse Cavalry, circa 1874–1878.” 831 Godfrey, “Company H Database Report,” 7 December 2005. 832 Baird, Tombstone Inscriptions, 199. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 214 The Men Other Family Information: [John Gott has name of Florence family genealogist.

Check. #] [***Find at the Marshall group that he started?] Sketches, Stories, & Letters: CSR: Enlisted 9 March 1863; horse killed 8 June 1863 Stevensburg; paid $600; wounded in head and captured 9 June 1863 Beverly Ford; exchanged June 1863; paroled 25 June 1863; paroled 13 May 1865 Fairfax Courthouse.

Additional Information: Florence, R.

C.833 “Had a livery stable on Court Street.” See 834 Present September 1864.

Source? “Robert C.

Florance, Private, buried Warrenton Cemetery.”835 John Madison Follin Y M V K T Photo: Provided by Mrs.

Metzinger.836 833 “Roster of the Black Horse Cavalry, circa 1874–1878.” 834 Moffett, Those Who Were, 15. 835 Godfrey, “Company H Database Report,” 7 December 2005. 836 John Madison Follin portrait.

Image file Untitled-1.psd, scanned 17 January 2002 by author; file renamed 2006-06-21 John Madison Follin .from Ms.

M .Lynn scanned 2002-01-17 .psd by editor.

Original or duplicate print provided by Ms.

Metzinger (P.

O.

Box 225, Sperryville, Virginia 22740-0225) to author, before 17 January 2002; walletsize duplicate prints of cavalryman and Mrs.

Follin also provided to editor, 2 March 2006.

Image file Untitled-4.psd scanned by author, which shows the portrait’s verso, and the wallet-size print’s verso, display inscriptions in the handwriting of Ms.

Metzinger, identifying the subject. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 215 The Men “Tell mr Lynn that i have a photo of a Follin who served in the Blackhorse it is taken with a few other veterans in the late 20’s…”837 [***2006-06-28 eml to him asking to see photo; he replied saying he wld scan on 2006-07-03.

Haven’t rec’d as of 2006-07-22.] Born: 1844.838 29 November 1844,839 at Warrenton. 840 Marriage: Later in life, not immediately after the war.841 On 25 February 1875,842 he wed Georgianna (Dorsey) (2 July 1849–25 February 1926) in Washington, D.

C.

According to these dates, he was age 31 and she age 26 when they wed.

Her parents were Harriet (Severn)—“just like the river”843—and Ferdinand Dorsey.

Georgianna was born in Howard County, Maryland.844 837 Phil McCoy, “Re: Three Lewis Black Horse Men,” email from 1warbird@adelphia.net (525 North Maysville Road, Mt.

Sterling, Kentucky 40353) to editor, 30 December 2005. 838Jeannette Holland Austin, Confederate Dead Database CD-ROM (Lake Charles, LA: Frensley Software, 1998).

Work is a 1,987-page, read-only, Rich Text Format file, arranged alphabetically by last name, that was compiled from cemetery records and from Confederate Veteran Magazine issues of 1893–1919. 839 Stiles, 4th Virginia Cavalry, 110. 840 Letter, Edna Metzinger (previously cited) to author, 2 March 2006; held in 2007 by author.

Letter consists of Ms.

Metzinger’s handwritten notations to a 3 December 2005 printed draft excerpt of this manuscript’s Follin entry. 841 Interview with Edna Cornelia (Hughs) Metzinger (P.O.

Box 225, Sperryville, Virginia 22740), by editor, 30 November 2005.

Transcript held in 2007 by author.

Mrs.

Metzinger is grand-daughter to John Madison Follin. 842 N.

B.: They celebrated an anniversary on 23 February. 843 Interview with Edna Metzinger (previously cited) by editor, 28 June 2006.

Transcript held in 2007 by author. 844 Letter, Edna Metzinger to author, 2 March 2006. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 — Edward Mewton Cologne “…E.

N.

Cologne was sergeant of the town with power to collect money as constable.

He had made a small claim against a painter whose impecuniosity was chronic.

He, Cologne, was pressing the debtor pretty hard for payment.

The latter told him that he had a very fine glazier’s diamond that he would place in his hands for security if he would advance him a couple more dollars to serve another pressing want.

There would still have been a margin of several dollars, as these instruments were then worth from eight to ten dollars each.

Cologne advanced the amount and took charge of the jewel. … Months passed and no redemption. [Cologne] finally got tired of waiting ….

Cologne was himself an expert auctioneer, and brought out the fine diamond with a great flourish and much commendation of its worth.

One who wanted it and knew about such things, took hold of it and at once discovered that the diamond itself … was gone and the worthless handle was all that the sergeant held for his five dollars.”3366 3365 Bray, William J., Jr., “The Grocer’s Boat,” Fredericksburg Times, June, 1989.

Mr.

Bray (918 Dawnwood Road, Midlothian, Virginia 23113,) is writing a history of the various steamers and companies that operated on the Rappahannock River between 1821 and 1937.

The reference provides additional information on Joe Colbert’s operation of his steamer. 3366 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 153. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 893 Stories Shortly after the war E.

M.

Cologne was clerking at the Warrenton House, the popular hotel that stood on the site now occupied by Gallaway’s livery stable.

Ned had taken on some of the adipose tissue that gives him his present aldermanic proportions, and Cab Maddux had quite as much the lead of him in that line as he has now.

There came one day into the office of the hotel a drunken fellow who made himself disagreeable—as drunken men generally do—to everybody.

Ned tried by kindness and persuasion to induce him to leave, but the more gentle he was the more boisterous the inebriate became.

Finally Ned had to knock him down in order to start him.

About an hour thereafter, the man returned, walked in and when near the clerk’s desk looked up and espied Cab Maddux where he had left Ned.

He stopped, stammered and finally got out, “my G-d, how he has growed!”, broke for the door and was never seen thereabouts again during Ned’s encumbency.

In the language of the “late lamented” this reminds me of a little joke told by Ned.

When he occupied the above position one of the members of the Warrenton Riflemen who went out with us at the beginning of the war was early detailed as a mechanic and sent to the far South.

He did not turn up at the close of the war, and no one here knew where he was.

Ned says that when he did put in his appearance about eighteen months afterward, he at night entered the hotel in a scared sort of way, rigged with full uniform, gun cartridge box and knapsack, just as he went Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 894 Stories forth five and a half years before, peered about stealthily, approached him and in a whisper asked, “Have you seen any Yankees about here?”3367 Robert Henry Downman “In 1817, a bride and groom, Mr.

And Mrs.

John B[artholomew] Downman, came to Warrenton, … from ‘Belle Isle,’ Lancaster County,…

They lived there until 1821, while they were building their home ‘Layton Stone,’ one mile north of Remington, ..on 1500 acres which John B.

Downman’s grandfather had bought from W.

William Robinson on March 19, 1773… “They had in time 10 daughters and 3 sons, all three of whom served in the Confederate Army.

John B.

Downman gave his second son, Robert Henry Downman, some land southeast of Layton Stone where he built a frame house called Ravescroft.

On April 30, 1856, he married Frances Scott Horner. “When the war clouds began to gather, he [Robert Henry] joined the Black Horse Cavalry…

Early in 1862, Union troops under General Pope were moving into lower Fauquier for their spring campaign.

Robert Henry Downman’s family had to seek refuge.

His wife and four children, one of them only three months old, and two servants, left with what few possessions they could take with them, and went to Bremo Bluff.

This young wife was not to see her home again, for Union troops tore down the house to use the lumber to make a marquee for a ball for General Pope. 3367 Klitch, Fauquier County 1840–1919, 97–98.+ Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 895 — “he sent Smith to Lee” (mid-April 1865) “When Mosby heard of the surrender, he sent Smith to Lee to inquire if he should continue the fight.

Meeting Lee at the home of Gen.

R.

H.

Chilton in Richmond, Smith asked the gallant soldier what Mosby should do.

Lee, true to his parole, refused to issue any orders to Mosby.

Smith then asked what he personally should do.

Lee told him to go home, which Smith did after first returning [on 17 April 18653448] to Mosby with Lee’s words of advice.

The “Gray Ghost” promptly disbanded his Rangers [on 21 April3449] and all went home.”3450 “Go home.” “Colonel Mosby called for volunteers to go into Richmond and, if possible, get some information as to what to do with his command….

Flanking the enemy’s pickets, five of us entered the city the next night, and, putting up my 3448 Litsey, “Smith: The Family of Mildred (Smith) Litsey,” 6. 3449 ibid. 3450 Trout, They Followed the Plume, 298.

Reference includes a detailed sketch of Channing’s military scouting career. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 969 Stories horse at a livery stable, I went to the home of my uncle, General Chilton,…

Thinking that he might possibly give me some information upon the subject.

The door at which I knocked was opened by Uncle Robert’s oldest daughter, Laura.

The family were all sitting in the dark, the gas works having been destroyed, when some one knocked at the door, and it proved to be General Lee.”3451 Often at night, for exercise and for the solace of starry skies, the General would walk through the mournful residential districts of the city, accompanied only by Mildred [his daughter], and sometimes he would stop at the home of some understanding friend.

One evening, when he called at General Chilton’s home, from which not a glint of light was to be seen, he found a welcome as bright as the house was dark.

A candle was lighted [for Lee upon his arrival], and there before him stood Channing Smith, one of the most daring of the cavalry spies, who belonged then to Mosby’s unsurrendered Rangers.

Lee was surprised to see the boy, and the young trooper was shocked at the sight of the old commander to whose tent he had brought so many reports. “O! What a change in his appearance!” Smith wrote. “The last time I had seen him he was in the fullest glory of his splendid manhood, and now pale and wan with the sorrow of blighted hopes.

I could not help nor was I ashamed of the tears which 3451 Channing M.

Smith, “The Last Time I Saw General Lee,” Confederate Veteran vol.

“V, no. 9 (September, 1927): 327. Draft Manuscript Last Saved June 4, 2007 970 Stories filled my eyes.” Smith had a message from Mosby, a message and a question: What should the Rangers do? Should they surrender or fight on? Lee answered: “Give my regards to Colonel Mosby, and tell him that I am under parole, and cannot, for that reason, give him any advice.” “But, General,” said the young scout, “what must I do?” “Channing,” replied the General, “go home, all you boys who fought with me, and help to build up the shattered fortunes of our old state.”3452 “I never saw him again, but “no calumny can ever darken his fame, for history has lighted his name and image with her everlasting lamp.” ”3453 “I knew Lee well” “…I knew Gen.

Robert E.

Lee very well during the war between the States … first time I met him was at the Battle of Sharpsburg – Antietam.

I was introduced to him by my Uncle, Gen’l R.

H.

Chilton, his Adjutant General, and was also introduced to Gen’l Stonewall Jackson at the same time … [I] had the

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