Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Equi.Linn Sports Bra Amsterdam - Equi.Linn Sports Bra - Equi.Linn sports Lingerie - For the Rider Horses-store.comRoping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….

 TAILS  OF  TWO  PINHOOKERS     JUSTIN  CUNNINGHAM  AND  TATE  BENNETT  ARE  TAKING  AN  AGE-­‐OLD  METHOD  OF  BUYING  AND   SELLING  HORSES  TO  THE  CUTTING  HORSE  SALE  ARENA       By  Steve  Warren   Jan.  1,  2011   Pinhooking  has  been  going  on  in  the  Thoroughbred  industry  for  many  years  but  in  the  past  decade  or  so   it  has  become  a  business  model  for  those  wishing  to  turn  a  profit  in  the  Thoroughbred  industry  without   actually  racing  the  horses  they  buy.    Pinhookers  typically  buy  yearlings  at  the  fall  sales,  condition  them   and  start  their  introduction  to  riding  and  race  track  conditions,  then  re-­‐sell  them  at  the  following  year’s   two-­‐year  old  sales.    They  then  start  the  process  all  over  again.         The  pinhookers  with  a  good  eye  for  a  horse  and  the  ability  to  move  that  horse  forward  in  their   conditioning  and  racing  education  make  a  profit.    With  the  advent  in  recent  years  of  radiograph   repositories  at  all  the  major  sales,  they  have  had  to  become  very  proficient  at  detecting  flaws  that  may   be  minor  but  will  usually  preclude  re-­‐selling  at  a  high  enough  price  to  sustain  their  business  model.    In   addition  they  have  developed  a  very  good  eye  at  understanding  what  sires  will  be  or  are  in  fashion  and   for  the  conformation  necessary  to  success  on  the  race  track.   In  the  recent  past,  there  have  been  several  people  in  the  cutting  horse  industry  who  have  adopted  this   model  for  pinhooking  yearlings  that  will  be  re-­‐sold  as  2-­‐year  olds  for  top  futurity  prospects.    Justin   Cunningham  and  Tate  Bennett  are  two  young  pinhookers  who  were  highly  successful  at  this  year’s  NCHA   Futurity  2-­‐Year  Old  Sale  held  Dec.  8.  They  each  sold  three  horses  with  Justin  selling  all  three  of  his   consignments  for  a  total  of  $183,000,  averaging  $61,000.    Tate  sold  his  three  consignments  for  a  total  of   $210,000,  an  average  of  $70,000.    Tate  also  sold  the  high-­‐selling  2-­‐year  old,  Jewel  Bars  Cat,  a  stallion   sired  by  High  Brow  Cat  out  of  Sprats  Dualin  Jewel  by  Lenas  Jewel  Bars,  for  $110,000  to  the  Center  Ranch,   Centerville,  Texas.     Justin  and  Tate  came  from  different  geographical  locations  using  somewhat  different  methods,  based  on   their  location,  availability  of  cattle  and  other  resources,  who  have  achieved  very  similar  outcomes:  a   good  price  in  the  2-­‐year-­‐old  sale  arena.     JUSTIN  CUNNINGHAM:       Justin,  30,  is  unmarried,  and  lives  in  Bethalto,  located  in  west  central  Illinois.  He  operates  half  of  the  year   out  of  his  family’s  Thoroughbred  farm  where  he  and  his  father,  Robert,  pinhook  Thoroughbred  race   horses.    Several  years  ago,  he  and  his  father  decided  to  add  some  real  excitement  to  their  lives  and   began  riding  cutting  horses.    While  buying,  training  and  showing  cutting  horses,  they  had  an  epiphany,   thinking,  “Why  not  put  the  same  pinhooking  principles  to  work  in  the  cutting  horse  industry?”    Justin   became  the  cutting  horse  pinhooking  specialist  while  Robert  gives  him  advice  and  helps  him  scout  the   NCHA  Futurity  sales  for  prospects.      Justin  usually  buys  three  or  four  yearlings  at  the  sales,  takes  them   back  to  Illinois  and  begins  their  training.    During  this  past  year’s  Futurity  sales,  Justin  bought  four   prospects  and  his  father  bought  two.         When  they  get  the  prospects  home,  Justin  starts  them  under  saddle,  eventually  introducing  them  to   buffalo.    The  Thoroughbred  operation  in  Illinois  is  not  large  enough  for  race  horses  and  cattle  so  in  April,   when  cattle  are  becoming  absolutely  necessary  for  the  horses’  education,    Justin  is  on  the  move  to   North  Texas  and  as  far  west  as  New  Mexico  with  his  prospects,  staying  with  other  well-­‐known  trainers   while  receiving  advice  and  help.    Justin  stays  on  the  road  training  his  prospects  until  the  falls  sales.    He   says  that  by  doing  it  this  way  he  has  better  access  to  good  cattle  and  gets  some  really  great  help  from   people  he  admires  and  respects  including  Kathy  Daughn,  Gonsalves,  Texas;  Pete  Branch  at  Lonnie   Allsup’s  El  Cid  Ranch  on  the  New  Mexico  border  in  Farwell,  Texas,  who  let  Justin  spend  as  much  time  as   he  needed  with  him;  Dean  Terry,  DeSoto,  Mo.;  Kevin  Miller,  Hermitage,  Mo.;  Craig  Thompson,  Buffalo,   Texas,  and  Foster  Johnson,  who  also  works  out  of  El  Cid.     “I’m  pretty  sure  I’m  leaving  people  out  who  need  to  be  thanked,”  said  Justin,  “and  I  would  like  to  take   this  opportunity  to  thank  them.”  He  credits  cutting  horse  trader/trainer  Dean  Terry  for  really  helping   him  get  started  with  cutting  horses;  however,  his  father,  Robert  was  the  largest  influence  on  him.    Justin   and  Robert  have  a  reciprocating  arrangement,  with  Justin  going  to  the  Thoroughbred  sales,  usually  held   in  September  at  Keeneland,  to  help  find  prospects  for  his  father.  Robert  reciprocates  at  the  yearling   sales  held  during  the  NCHA  Futurity  in  Fort  Worth.    This  year,  Justin  also  experimented  in  the  breeding   business  by  breeding  his  mare,  Joys  Indian  Pep,  to  Metallic  Cat.     Justin  buys  almost  exclusively  from  the  NCHA  Futurity  sales.    He  says,  “The  sales  people  at  Western   Bloodstock  have  been  really  good  to  me.”  However,  occasionally,  he  will  buy  a  few  young  horses   privately  or  at  the  NCHA  Derby  sales  but  he  says  he  really  prefers  the  NCHA  Futurity  sales.         Justin  will  also  sell  a  few  horses  privately,  including  this  year’s  AQHA  Superhorse,  7-­‐year-­‐old  Play  Dual   Rey  (a.k.a.  Raymond),  a  son  of  Dual  Rey  out  of  Dual  Hiccup  N  Play  by  Doc’s  Hickory,  owned  by  the  The   Play  Dual  Rey  partnership,  Whitesboro,  Texas.    Justin  originally  sold  Raymond  as  a  3-­‐year-­‐old  to  the   Cottonwood  Ranch,  Minneapolis,  Minn.    The  following  year  he  was  purchased  by  Eduardo  Pino  Ribeiro,   Joliet,  Mont.,  and  trained  to  be  a  snaffle  bitter.  Casey  Hinton,  Whitesboro,  Texas,  traded  for  Raymond   when  he  was  a  4-­‐year-­‐old  and  formed  a  partnership  with  a  group  from  Fort  Stockton  who  showed  an   interest  in  Raymond.    As  a  7-­‐year-­‐old  Raymond  was  named  the  AQHA  Superhorse  at  the  AQHA  World   Show  after  being  ridden  by  Hinton  in  the  Senior  Heeling  and  Reining,  C.R.  Bradley  and  Rich  Rosachi  in   the  Senior  Roping  classes  and  Todd  Crawford  in  the  Working  Cow  Horse  class.         Asked  what  he  looks  for  in  a  prospect,  Justin  said  that  the  prospect  must  be  “sired  by  a  stallion  that   people  will  look  for,  such  as  High  Brow  Cat  or  One  Time  Pepto.    He  says  they  have  to  be  pretty  and  have   the  right  conformation.    He  cannot  afford  to  overlook  small  faults  that  other  buyers  can  when  they   intend  to  keep  the  prospect  and  go  on  with  it  in  training.    He  says,  “They  have  to  be  ‘real  clean’  ‘cause   even  a  small  blemish  can  cause  the  sale  of  a  prospect  to  fall  through.”         Justin  looked  into  a  crystal  ball  last  year  and  made  a  crucial  decision  when  he  decided  that  One  Time   Pepto  would  be  the  next  good  sire  and  purchased  two  of  his  offspring  during  the  2009  NCHA  Futurity.     At  this  year’s  NCHA  Futurity  2-­‐Year-­‐Old  Sale,  he  sold  Four  or  Five  Times,  a  sorrel  son  of  One  Time  Pepto   out  of  Lovely  Lynnie  O  Lena  by  Doc  O’Lena,    and  One  Fabulous  Time,  a  blue  roan  stallion  by  One  Time   Pepto  out  of  Cat  Mist  by  High  Brow  Cat,  for  $90,000  and  $50,000,  respectively.    Justin  also  sold  Hicka   Rey,  a  red-­‐roan  stallion  by  Dual  Rey  out  of  Hicka  Boonboon  by  Peptoboonsmal,  for  $43,000  for  a  total  of   $183,000  and  an  average  of  $61,000.    All  three  of  the  horses  he  sold  at  this  year’s  2-­‐Year-­‐Old  Futurity   sale  went  to  working  cow  horse  owners:  Cory  Cushing  bought  one  for  his  customer,  Jeff  Matthews,  the   owner  of  One  Time  Pepto,  as  did  Todd  Crawford,  a  top  working  cow  horse  competitor  and  trainer,  and   Luke  Jones.     Justin’s  long-­‐range  plans  for  the  future  include  moving  his  operation  to  the  Weatherford,  Texas,  area   while  he  continues  to  pinhook  and  perhaps  move  into  doing  more  showing.    Justin  can  be  reached  at   618-­‐616-­‐7988  or  by  email  at  Justin@Bloodstockhorses.com.     TATE  BENNETT:   Tate  Bennett,  27,  is  a  good  friend  of  Justin’s  and  they  communicate  often,  offering  each  other  help  if   they  need  it.    Tate  is  a  former  roper  from  Hereford,  Texas,  who  discovered  the  good  times  and  thrills  of   riding  cutting  horses.  But  he  lives  so  far  out  in  the  country  that  it  is  a  30-­‐mile  ride  to  get  fuel  and  a  40-­‐ mile  ride  to  get  groceries.    He  is  married  to  Laura,  who  he  says  is  “the  backbone  of  my  operation.”    He   and  Laura  have  a  soon-­‐to-­‐be  five-­‐month-­‐old  son.         Laura’s  father,  Joe  Perrin,  owns  35,000  acres  in  West  Texas  and  runs  anywhere  from  2,500  to  4,500   yearling  cattle  on  grass  and  wheat  pasture.    Tate  emphasizes  that  taking  care  of  the  cattle  are  his  FIRST   job,  as  he  is  responsible  for  keeping  them  healthy,  moving  them  to  pastures  and  in  every  way  ensuring   their  welfare.  Laura  rides  with  him,  helping  with  the  cattle  work,  doctoring  and  all  the  other  tasks   involved  in  keeping  that  many  cattle  healthy  and  happy.      As  can  be  expected,  this  huge  job  provides   Tate  with  ample  opportunity  to  give  a  young  horse  plenty  of  jobs  to  do.    Tate  credits  this  exposure  to   real  work  as  a  true  asset  in  his  training  program.  His  prospects  have  had  a  lot  of  “wet  saddle  blankets,”   because  they  are  ridden  out  on  the  wheat  pastures  and  eventually  do  some  of  the  work  required  to   keep  the  cattle  healthy.  However,  Tate’s  sale  prospects  are  not  the  backbone  of  that  operation  as  he   also  has  ranch  horses  to  do  the  work,  which  he  will  sell  as  well-­‐broke  ranch  horses.     Tate  started  out  learning  about  cattle  from  his  father  who  always  had  cattle.    In  high  school,  Tate  was  a   roper  and  started  training  rope  horses.    Eventually  he  started  training  colts  for  other  people.    As  a  fun   thing,  Tate  would  go  to  the  Clovis,  N.M.,  horse  sales  where  he  met  noted  auctioneer  Steve  Friskup.  Tate   credits  Steve  for  starting  him  down  his  current  path  to  training  cutting  horses  by  getting  him  better   horses  to  ride.    Eventually,  Tate  went  to  work  for  pinhooker,  Curtis  Bass,  Seymour,  Texas,  where  he   spent  about  two  and  half  months.    This  led  him  to  try  pinhooking  on  his  own.  When  Tate  bought  his  first   horse,  he  trained  him  in  the  wheat  fields,  doctored  cattle  on  him  and  finally  took  him  to  Fort  Worth,   where  the  horse  sold  quite  well.  After  that,  Tate  was  on  his  way  to  becoming  a  cutting  horse  pinhooker.         Unlike  Justin,  Tate  does  not  depend  on  the  NCHA  Futurity  sales  for  his  prospects.    He  is  constantly   looking  for  prospects,  saying  that  “the  time  of  year  doesn’t  matter.”    He  looks  for  a  “good  individual   with  good  x-­‐rays  that  is  sound,”  but  admits  that  “buying  a  colt  that  will  resell  well  is  very  hard  to  do.”       He  buys  the  best  prospects  he  can  afford  wherever  he  sees  one  that  fits  his  criteria:  popular  sires,  ie   High  Brow  Cat,  Peptoboonsmal  and  Dual  Rey  to  name  a  few;  excellent  conformation  and  good  minds.     Tate  tries  to  buy  two  or  three  prospects  to  sell  and  one  or  two  to  keep.  He  has  not  done  much  showing   but  wants  to  eventually  begin  showing  and  hopefully  work  his  way  up  to  the  big  show:  the  NCHA   Futurity.     Tate  said  he  doesn’t  do  all  this  for  the  money.    He  does  this  because  he  and  his  family  love  horses.    “If   you  could  see  where  I  live  you  would  understand,”  says  Tate,  stressing  over  and  over  again  that  he  and   his  family  do  this  for  the  love  of  the  horse  not  for  the  money.    He  wants  high  quality,  not  high  numbers.     “Ride  for  quality  not  for  quantity,”  says  Tate.         Tate  likes  2  year  olds  -­‐  buying  them  and  training  them  to  where  they  get  better  every  year.  He  wants  to   keep  learning  and  improving  his  training  and  improving  the  horses  he  buys  and  sells.    He  believes  hard   work  will  get  you  more  than  anything.    “I  don’t  push  my  horses,”  said  Tate.  “I  spend  quality  time  with   lots  of  rides  so  I  don’t  have  to  push  them.”      That  sums  up  his  philosophy  and  it  must  be  working.       At  this  year’s  NCHA  Futurity  2-­‐Year-­‐Old  Sale,  Tate  sold  the  high-­‐seller:  Jewel  Bar  Cat,  a  sorrel  stallion  by   High  Brow  Cat  out  of  Sprats  Dualin  Jewel  by  Lenas  Jewel  Bars,  for  $110,000  to  the  Center  Ranch  in   Centerville,  Texas.  He  also  sold  James  Boond,  a  red  roan  stallion  by  Peptoboonsmal  out  of  Stylish   Amanda  by  Docs  Styish  Oak,  for  $65,000  and  Dual  Spice,  a  sorrel  daughter  of  Dual  Pep  out  of  Spicy  O   Lena  by  Doc  O’Lena,  for  $35,000  for  a  total  of  $210,000  and  an  average  of  $70,000.    Another  horse   initially  did  sell  for  a  higher  price,  but  it  was  later  learned  the  sale  did  not  complete  which  made  Jewel   Bar  Cat  the  high  seller  of  the  sale.     Tate  is  taking  outside  horses  to  train.    He  can  be  reached  at  Bennett_Tate@hotmail.com  or  you  can  call   him  at  1-­‐806-­‐336-­‐9090.   Glory  Ann  Kurtz,  former  editor  of  the  Quarter  Horse  News  and  current  editor  of  this  on-­‐line  publication   attended  every  sale  session  at  the  Futurity.    She  said  she  noticed  that  the  horses  going  through  the  ring   with  Justin  and  Tate  as  the  trainers  and  riders  did  not  tarry  under  the  auctioneer’s  hammer.    Opening   bids  were  generally  higher  on  their  horses  and  many  bidders  kept  the  bidding  lively.    She  felt  that  people   came  to  the  sale  “looking  for  horses  trained  and  demonstrated  by  these  two  trainers.”   Tate  and  Justin  are  two  of  the  very  few  pinhookers  in  the  cutting  horse  industry  who  have  been  very   successful  –  even  though  they  come  from  different  parts  of  the  country  with  very  different  backgrounds   and  use  very  different  approaches.          

Read more about Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….:

Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra

Other Sources:

  • Chinese Horoscopes – The Horse
  • horses – YouTube
  • Horse Saddle Accessories – National Bridle Shop
  • Equestrian Products – Guardian Horse Bedding, Equiderma Skin Products, Equilinn Sports Bra, Learn more about Equi.Linn Sports Bra Amsterdam – Equi.Linn Sports Bra – Equi.Linn sports Lingerie – For the Rider Horses-store.com HERE:

    Horses-Store.com and Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….
    Horses-Store.com - Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….
    Horses-Store.com and Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….
    Horses-Store.com - Roping : Bradley and Rich Rosachi in the Senior Roping classes and….