Scratches : A horse officially entered for a race but not permitted….

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Equi.Linn Sports Lingerie for women with style Horses-store.comScratches : A horse officially entered for a race but not permitted….

AHP Style Guide for Equine Publications A “A” License USTA “A” Tracks, “B” Tracks USTA A, AA, AAA, AAAT, B AAEP, American Association of Equine Practitioners A-B-C racing USTA AjPHA, American Junior Paint Horse Association ACE – acetylpromazine ACHA – American Cutting Horse Association AFA – American Farriers Association AHSA – American Horse Shows Association AI – artificial insemination ANHA – American Novice Horse Association, Cowboy Publishing Group APHA, American Paint Horse Association APHA Champion APHA Youth Champion Award APHA Superior All-Around-Horse Award APHA Superior Event Horse Award APHA Supreme Champion Award APHA World Championship Show ApHC, Appaloosa Horse Club AQHA, American Quarter Horse Association ASHA, American Saddlebred Horse Association ATPC, American Team Penning Association a half-mile track a five-eighths-mile track a three-quarter-mile track Academy – Upper case when in a proper name (The Academy of Arts and Sciences).

Lower case on a second reference (the academy had a meeting).

Avoid second references such as “The Cleveland academy.” accommodate account wagering Betting by phone, in which a bettor must open an account with a track or off-track agency.

A euphemism for phone betting.

Such systems should be identified as telephone-account wagering in the first reference.

Accoutrements acknowledgment acre – use numbers, 4-acre pasture acey-deucy Uneven stirrups, popularized by Racing Hall of Fame jockey Eddie Arcaro, who rode with his left (inside) iron lower than his right to achieve better balance on turns.

Acronyms Letters that take the place of words or phrases that are pronounced as words.

For instance, NYRA is an acceptable second reference for the New York Racing Association.

See abbreviations.

Across the board A bet on a horse to win, place, and show.

If the horse wins, the player collects three ways; if second, two ways (place and show); and if third, one way (show).

Action (n.) 1) A horse’s manner of moving. 2) A term meaning wagering.

The horse took a lot of action.

Acupressure Utilizing stimulation on acupuncture points to treat an animal.

Acupuncture A centuries-old therapy for treating an animal or human through the use of needles, electrical current, or moxibustion (heat and herbs) to stimulate or realign the body’s electrical fields.

Added money (n.) Money added to the purse of a race by the racing association, a breeding fund, or other source.

The association’s money is added to the amount paid by owners in nomination, eligibility, entry, and starting fees.

The purse of the Lane’s End Breeders’ Futurity (G2) is $400,000 added.

Added-money stakes became less common in the 1990s as more tracks went to guaranteed purses.

Added-money (adj.) The Cigar Mile Handicap (G1) is an added-money event.

Added weight A horse carrying more weight than the conditions of the race require, usually because the jockey exceeds the assigned weight.

See overweight.

Adequan Brand name for polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, used in the treatment of certain arthritic conditions.

Addresses – Use varies by publication.

Some abbreviate street names and others do not..

SEE STATES.

Adviser Not advisor.

Aficionado affect versus effect Effect as a noun means result.

Effect as a verb means to bring about or accomplish.

Affect means to influence.

In practical use, effect is most often a noun, and affect is almost always used as a verb.

Afterward (no s) age All Thoroughbreds born in the Northern Hemisphere celebrate their birthday on January 1.

For the Southern Hemisphere, the birthdays are as follows: South America, July 1; South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, August 1.

Hyphenation of ages in text dependa upon the use.

He is two years old.

He is a two-year-old.

The two-yearold filly was purchased for $35,000.

Agent A person empowered to transact business for a stable owner or jockey, or empowered to sell or buy horses for an owner or breeder.

The phrase jockey’s agent is preferred over jockey agent or jock’s agent.

Aide/aid – An aide is a person who helps, but you can come to someone’s aid.

Aisleway aired Not running at best speed in a race; won particularly easily by open lengths.

Airtight aka Abbreviation for also known as; no periods, no spaces.

Ak-Sar-Ben Use historical spelling and punctuation for former racetrack in Omaha, Nebraska.

See Appendix A for correct names for racetracks.

A la carte all-age race A race for two-year-olds and up.

All-around Capitalized only when part of a name of an award.

Alleyway allowances Reductions in weights to be carried, with the adjustments based on the conditions of the race or because an apprentice jockey is on a horse.

Also, a weight reduction that female horses are entitled to when racing against males, or that three-year-olds receive against older horses.

All out (adv.) When a horse extends itself to the utmost.

All-out (adj.) The horse scored an all-out victory.

All right (adv.) Never alright.

Hyphenated only if used colloquially as a compound modifier.

He is an all-right guy.

All time (n.) Skip Away is the leading North American earner of all time.

All-time (adj.) The all-time leading earner.

Alongside although – though can be substituted, but although should be used when starting a sentence; however, no comma following although.

Cowboy Publishing Group also-eligible (n.) A horse officially entered for a race, but not permitted to start unless the field is reduced by scratches below a specified number.

Always hyphenated.

Also-ran (n.) A horse that does not finish first, second, or third.

A.m.

Lowercase with periods.

See p.m.

American Championship Harness Series USTA American Championship Racing Series Defunct series of races held from 1991 to ’93.

Conceived by Barry Weisbord, the ACRS consisted of a series of races for older horses run at a number of tracks around the country.

A bonus system based on total number of points earned in each race based on finish position was paid to encourage participation and keep horses in the events that were familiar to racing fans.

All the races were televised on either the ABC network or its sister cable network ESPN. American Horse Council A national association of individuals, organizations, and companies formed as a lobbying group to represent all breeds of the horse industry.

Based in Washington, D.C., the AHC works on tax regulations, import and export rules, disease prevention and control, trails and recreation enhancement, and humane concerns.

Begun in 1969, AHC was formed as an advocate of the entire American horse industry, though started principally by Thoroughbred interests concerned about legislation that was being discussed in Congress that would have negatively affected racing and breeding.

American-National USTA American Paint Horse Association Headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas.

Website is www.apha.com.

American Quarter Horse Association Headquarters in Amarillo, Texas.

Website is www.aqha.com.

American Youth Horse Council (AYHC) Website is www.ayhc.com American Stud Book Official book of foal registrations maintained by the Jockey Club.

Amid Amishman among ampersands Used only in abbreviations and firm names.

Dow Jones & Co.

It is not a catchall substitute for the word “and.” and/or This phrase is frequently misused because in most cases the meaning actually is one or the other.

In a few cases, however, the sentence actually means either of two possibilities or both of them.

In those cases, however, a more elegant construction than and/or is available.

Under the state guidelines, the penalty for a clenbuterol positive was a $1,000 fine, a 30-day suspension, or both.

Anesthesia angular limb deformity A limb that does not have correct conformation because of developmental problems in the angles of the joints.

Anhydrosis Inability to sweat in response to work output or increases in body temperature.

A horse with this condition is also known as a non-sweater.

Most are athletic horses, though frequently the condition appears in pastured horses not being ridden.

Most commonly occurs when both the temperature and humidity are high.

Horses raised in temperate regions and then transported to hot climates are most prone to develop the condition, but even acclimated horses can be at risk.

Clinical signs include inability to sweat, increased respiratory rate, elevated body temperature, and decreased exercise tolerance.

The condition sometimes can be reversed if the horse is moved to a more temperate climate.

Anterior Toward the front.

Anterior enteritis Acute inflammation of the small intestine producing signs of abdominal distress, such as colic and diarrhea.

Anthelmintic anti-inflammatory antivenin anxious The root of anxious is anxiety, and proper use of the word usually should be limited to situations involving anxiety.

In many cases, the proper word choice is eager.

For instance, The actor was anxious for the show to begin, but the audience was eager to see the opening scene.

The nervous filly was anxious behind the starting gate, but the champion was eager to go to the lead on the backstretch.

Any more apical (fracture) See sesamoid bones.

Apostrophes Indicates the possessive cases of nouns, omission of figures, and contractions.

I’ve, isn’t.

Avoid the use of contractions in copy.

Omission of figures—’90, ’90s, class of ’72.

The apostrophe use or lack thereof should follow the official name of group, institution, locality.

Prince of Wales’s Stakes, Ocala Breeders’ Sales Co., California Thoroughbred Breeders Association, Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association.

See abbreviations (Days, years), contractions, dates, plurals, possessives, years.

Appaloosa apprentice jockey Rider at the beginning of his career who has not ridden a certain number of winners within a specified period of time.

Also known as a bug rider, from the asterisk used in racing programs and past performances to denote the weight allowance such riders receive.

Apprentice allowance Weight concession given to an apprentice rider—usually ten pounds until the fifth winner, seven pounds until the 35th winner, and five pounds for one calendar year from the 35th winner.

More rarely, a three-pound allowance is allowed to a rider under contract to a specific stable or owner for two years from his or her first win.

This rule varies from state to state.

Apprentices do not receive an allowance when riding in a stakes race.

All jockeys going from track to track must have a receipt from the clerk of scales from their track verifying the jockey’s most recent total number of wins.

Also known as a bug, from the asterisk used in racing programs and past performances to denote the weight allowance.

Apron The (usually) paved area between the grandstand and the racing surface.

Arabian Breed of horse is capitalized.

Appaloosas, Quarter Horse, Morgan, Thoroughbred, Standardbred.

See breeds.

Arabic numerals See numbers.

Arizona Symposium on Racing arthritis Inflammation of a joint.

An increase in the amount of synovial fluid in the joint is a result of this inflammation.

Accumulation of synovial fluid in the fetlock joint is called a wind puff or wind gall.

In young horses, a swelling in the fetlock joint, particularly on the front of the joint where the cannon and long pastern bones meet, is called a green osselet.

This swelling is a result of inflammation and reactive changes of the front edges of these two bones and adjacent cartilage.

If the green osselet does not heal, a chronic osselet might develop with a permanent buildup of synovial fluid in the joint and inflammation and thickening of the joint capsule over the damaged area with secondary bone changes following the initial inflammation.

Arthroscope A tiny tube containing a lens that is used for viewing areas inside a joint.

Usually attached to a small video camera.

Arthroscopic surgery Utilizing an arthroscope to perform surgery, eliminating the need to open the joint with a large incision to view the damaged area.

Signs include inability to sweat, increased respiratory rate, elevated body temperature, and decreased exercise tolerance.

The condition sometimes can be reversed if the horse is moved to a more temperate climate.

Art Rooney Memorial USTA articles The word the does not have to precede the names of organizations.

Inclusion of the will depend on use.

If the sentence structure requires the word the, insert it.

If it reads fine without it, leave it out.

The HBPA board of directors met today.

NYRA executives met recently.

See acronyms, abbreviations.

Article titles – Quotes, no italitcs articles, omission of Frequently, writers will omit the article the from the beginning of a lead sentence.

Reason for his dismissal was flagrant absenteeism.

This is case of old-time journalese and is best avoided.

If the word “the” at the beginning of a story is undesirable— and it often is—the best tactic is to rewrite the sentence.

Articular cartilage Cartilage that covers the ends of bones where they meet in a joint.

Artificial breeding Includes artificial insemination or embryo transfer (transplants).

Not approved by the Jockey Club.

Artwork arytenoid cartilages Triangular cartilages in the upper part of the entrance to the larynx.

Movements of the arytenoid cartilages control the diameter of the laryngeal opening.

Association of Racing Commissioners International (RCI) Formerly the National Association of State Racing Commissioners (NASRC) before name change.

Office based in Lexington.

Use RCI on second reference.

Ascarids aside – aside from, not just aside Cowboy Publishing Group ass association – Capitalize as a formal name, but lower case on second reference.

Correct abbreviation is assn.

On first reference, spell out association with acronym in parentheses.

Second reference can be just acronym.

Asterisk Used with names of horses to denote they were imported to the United States.

Practice preceded the use of country codes starting on January 1, 1977.

An asterisk is also often used to denote an apprentice jockey is riding.

Ataxia Loss or failure of muscular coordination.

At the three-quarters at the five-eighths at stud at present – means now. “Presently” means in a little while or shortly. “At present” generally the preferred usage.

Cowboy Publishing Group Atlantic City Race Course USTA Atlantic Sires Stakes USTA atrophy To waste away; usually used in describing muscles.

Attorney, lawyer The words are not interchangeable.

A lawyer is a person who has earned a law degree and is practicing law.

He or she becomes an attorney when representing someone.

Two proper uses—A tax lawyer, John Jones specialized in cases involving the Tax Reform Act of 1986.

Dean Sarvis’s attorney said he had appealed the Indiana suspension.

Attribution A person being quoted directly must be identified by name as early as possible, usually in a sentence preceding the quote or at the end of the first sentence of the quote. “The horse will race tomorrow,” Smith said.

Not, “The horse will race tomorrow.

Next month we will think of some other race,” he said.

Not, “The horse will race tomorrow.

Next month we will think of some other race,” Smith said.

Additionally, any time another person is quoted, the new person must be identified by name within the next quote.

Do not make the reader guess who is talking.

Audiovisual Australian races In racecourse designations, the abbreviated name of the racing association is denoted without periods.

VRC Derby, AJC Derby.

Autopsy – for a person; a horse has a necropsy USTA auxiliary starting gate A second starting gate used when the number of horses in a race exceeds the capacity of the main starting gate.

Average earnings are USTA average earnings index (AEI) A breeding statistic that compares racing earnings of a stallion or mare’s foals to those of all other foals racing at that time.

An AEI of 1.00 is considered average, 2.00 is twice the average, 0.50 half the average, etc.

Avermectin awhile, a while Word “for” is implicit in awhile.

He plans to stay awhile.

He plans to stay for a while.

AXCIS Information Network Inc.

USTA B BBA, British Bloodstock Agency BHB, British Horseracing Board baby race A race for two-year-olds.

Use should be limited to direct quotes.

Back at the knee A leg that looks as though it has a backward arc, with its apex at –B– baby raceA race for twoyear-olds.

Use should be limited to direct quotes.

Baby-sit back at the knee A leg that looks as though it has a backward arc, with its apex at the knee when viewed from the side.

Back seat backstretch 1) Straight portion of the far side of the racing surface between the turns. 2) Generally, a racetrack’s stable area, which often contains dormitories, a track kitchen, chapel, and recreation area for stable employees.

It gained its name because most stable areas are located along the racetrack’s backstretch.

The area also is known colloquially as backside, but that use should be limited to direct quotations.

To avoid confusion, stable area is the preferred term.

See also racetrack slang.

Backward Not backwards.

Back yard (n.) back-yard (adj.) Bacteria A plural noun and requires a plural verb.

The singular is bacterium.

Bad doer A horse with a poor appetite, a condition that may be due to nervousness or other causes.

Bald face ballclub, ballpark, ballplayer, ballroom banamine bandana Band-Aid Trademarked name for an adhesive bandage.

Bandage Bandages used on a horse’s legs are three to six inches wide and are made of a variety of materials.

In a race, they are used for support or protection against injury.

Rundown bandages are used during a race and usually have a pad under the fetlock to avoid injury due to abrasion when the fetlocks sink toward the ground during the weight-bearing portion of the canter.

A horse may also wear standing bandages, thick cotton wraps used during shipping and while in the stall to prevent swelling, injury, or both.

Bankroll barbecue (not bar-b-que) barbed-wire barn name barn sour barnyard barren Used to describe a mare that was bred and did not conceive during the last breeding season.

Barrier A starting device used in steeplechasing consisting of an elastic band stretched across the racetrack; the elastic cords spring back when released.

Also known as a tape.

Barrel divisions – 1D not 1-D Cowboy Publishing Group barrel racer barrel times – no colon in front of time; not :14.58 bar shoe A horseshoe closed at the back to help support the frog and heel of the hoof.

It is often worn by horses with quarter cracks or bruised feet.

Base The portion of the track that lies under the thick, top layer (see cushion).

The base provides support and drainage.

Basilar (fracture) See sesamoid bones.

Bat A jockey’s whip.

Battery A term for an illegal electrical device used by a jockey to stimulate a horse by electrical shock during a race.

Also known as a machine or joint.

Battle of Saratoga USTA bay A horse color that varies from a yellow-tan to a bright auburn.

The mane, tail, and lower portion of the legs are always black, except where white markings are present.

Bearing in (or out) Deviating from a straight course.

May be due to weariness, infirmity, inexperience, or the rider overusing the whip or reins to make a horse alter its course.

Bedroll bell Signal sounded when the starter opens the gates or, at some tracks, to mark the close of betting.

Bell boots bellwether A leader or trendsetter.

In its original meaning, a bellwether is a sheep, usually wearing a bell, that led the flock.

It has nothing to do with good weather.

Bellyband Bereiter – Dressage Today, (rider) Bereiteranwartev – Dressage Today, (student rider) Berry’s Creek Pace Hoof Beats between and among In general, between designates a relationship between two entities, and among describes the relationship of three or more entities.

For instance, The agreement between Churchill Downs and the Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association set aside a percentage of simulcast wagering for purses.

Or, An agreement among the nation’s racetracks established a set rate for simulcasting signals.

This is in accord with the AP Stylebook.

However, one of the 20th century’s pre-eminent arbiters of style, the late Theodore Bernstein, maintained that between could be used for more than two entities if a strong relationship exists.

For instance, Bernstein would defend the sentence: The new contract between Hollywood Park, Santa Anita Park, and the tracks’ suppliers was signed on July 15.While it is not incorrect among the nation’s racetracks established a set rate for simulcasting signals.

This is in accord with the AP Stylebook.

However, one of the 20th century’s pre-eminent arbiters of style, the late Theodore Bernstein, maintained that between could be used for more than two entities if a strong relationship exists.

For instance, Bernstein would defend the sentence: The new contract between Hollywood Park, Santa Anita Park, and the tracks’ suppliers was signed on July 15.While it is not incorrect to use between in this or a similar to the relationship of two entities.

Beyer number A handicapping tool, popularized by author Andrew Beyer, assigning a numerical value (speed figure) to each race run by a horse based on final time and track condition.

This enables different horses running at different racetracks to be objectively compared.

Because the Beyer number is a handicapping tool, we do not refer to Beyer figures in race reports.

If the race was worthy of a high Beyer number, then the circumstances of the race will clearly reveal why the race was noteBeyer number A handicapping tool, popularized by author Andrew Beyer, assigning a numerical value (speed figure) to each race run by a horse based on final time and track condition.

This enables different horses running at different racetracks to be objectively compared.

Because the Beyer number is a handicapping tool, we do not refer to Beyer figures in race reports.

If the race was worthy of a high Beyer number, then the circumstances of the race will clearly reveal why the race was noteworthy.

Bid in The act of buying back a horse that does not meet the reserve at public auction.

See buy-back, reserve not attained, RNA.

Bid spotter Two words.

Big Red Refers to either of two famous chestnut-colored horses: Man o’ War or Secretariat.

Billions, millions Hyphenated when word replaces Arabic numbers. 7,000,000,000 becomes 7billion.

Do not go beyond two decimals. 1.35-billion people.

Billion in Britain is the equivalent of a trillion in the United States.

See numbers.

Bill Daly (on the) Taking a horse to the front at the start of a race and remaining there to the finish.

Term stems from “Father Bill” Daly, a famous old-time horseman who developed many great jockeys.

Billy Haughton “Good Guy” Award USTA bio-tech bimonthly/semimonthly – Bimonthly means occurring every two months.

Semimonthly means twice a month.

Also applies to biweekly, semiweekly, biennially, semiannually.

Birthdays All Thoroughbreds born in the Northern Hemisphere celebrate their birthday on January 1.

For the Southern Hemisphere, the birthdays are as follows: South America, July 1; South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, August 1.

Bit A stainless steel, rubber, or aluminum bar attached to the bridle; it is placed in the bar, the space between front and back teeth in the horse’s mouth and is one of the means by which a jockey exerts guidance and control.

The most common racing bit is the D-bit, named because the rings extending from the bar are shaped like the letter D.

Most racing bits are snaffled (snaffle bit), which means the metal bar is made up of two pieces, connected in the middle, which leaves it free to swivel.

Other bits may be used to correct specific problems, such as bearing in or out.

Bitmaker bitmaking black A horse color that includes the muzzle, flanks, mane, tail, and legs, unless white markings are present.

Black-Eyed Susan The name of the stakes race at Pimlico Race Course.

Black-eyed Susan The name of the flower.

Blacksmith A horseshoer who also works with metals.

A farrier works with horses’ feet.

Not interchangeable with farrier.

Some blacksmiths might be farriers, but farriers are not blacksmiths.

Black type Boldface type, used in sales catalogs and stakes shells, to distinguish horses that have won or placed in a stakes race.

Sales companies today have eliminated the use of black type for stakes below a certain monetary level—$15,000 in 1985; $20,000 from 1986-’89; $25,000 beginning in 1990; and $30,000 beginning in 2002.

If a horse’s name appears in boldface capital letters in a catalog or stakes shell, the horse has won at least one black-type event.

If the name appears in boldface type with capital and lower-case letters, the horse was second or third in at least one black-type event.

Black type was awarded to fourth-place finishers in graded races before January 1, 1990.

THOROUGHBRED TIMES in its stakes shells uses black type for any added-money winner regardless of size of purse and does not follow catalog standards.

Black-box testing USTA black type (n.) He earned black type for the first time with his victory in the Stymie Handicap.

Black-type (adj.) He was a black-type performer.

Black type committee on pedigrees USTA black type standards USTA bleeder A horse that bleeds within its lungs when small capillaries that surround the lungs’ air sacs (alveoli) rupture.

The veterinary term is exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

Blood may be seen coming out of the horse’s nostrils, known as epistaxis, although it is typically discovered by an examination using a fiber optic endoscope examination after exercise or racing.

Hot, humid weather and cold conditions are known to exacerbate the problem.

The most common preventative treatment currently available is the use of the diuretic furosemide (Salix).

Less than one bleeder in 20 shows signs of epistaxis.

Blind switch A circumstance in which a rider’s actions cause him to be impeded during a race when moving into a space in which he finds himself blocked.

Blinkers A cup-shaped device to limit a horse’s vision and thus prevent it from swerving from objects or other horses on either side while racing.

Blinker cups come in a variety of sizes and shapes to allow as little or as much vision as the trainer feels is necessary and may be attached to a hood or bridle.

Blister Counterirritant causing acute inflammation used to increase blood supply and blood flow and to promote healing in the leg.

Bloodline blood horse bloodstock Horses of Thoroughbred breeding, especially such horses used for or considered in relation to racing.

Bloodstock agent A person who advises or represents a buyer or seller of Thoroughbreds at a public auction or a private sale.

A bloodstock agent usually works on commission, often 5% of the purchase or sale price, and can also prepare a horse for sale.

Blood type (n.) blood-type (adj.

And v.) Blood-type and blood-typing.

Blood-typing A way to verify a horse’s parentage.

Blood-typing is usually completed within the first year of a horse’s life and is necessary before registration papers will be issued by the Jockey Club.

Thoroughbred Times USTA Blood Typing Department USTA blowout (n.) A short, timed workout, usually a day or two before a race, designed to sharpen a horse’s speed.

Usually three-eighths or one-half of a mile in distance.

Blow out (v.) He will blow out a quarter-mile before the race.

Blue roan Bluegrass (USTA races) Bluegrass-Meadow Lands Farm 2-year-old colt pace Bluegrass-Cane Run Farm 2-year-old filly pace Bluegrass-Walnut Hall Cup 2-year-old colt trot Bluegrass-Johnston Memorial 2-year-old filly trot Bluegrass-Walnut Hall Farm 3-year-old colt pace Bluegrass-Cuddy Farms 3-year-old filly pace Bluegrass-Transylvania 3-year-old colt trot Bluegrass-Dunroven Stud 3-year-old filly trot Bluegrass Capitalize when describing the Central Kentucky region and specifically Fayette County and contiguous counties.

Bluegrass (lowercase) Any of a large genus (Poa) of temperate and arctic forage grasses found in Central Kentucky and elsewhere.

Blue Grass Stakes Graded race conducted at Keeneland Race Course.

Blue hen Lowercase.

Used to describe a great broodmare, producer of a number of stakes winners and whose daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters in turn produced important winners.

Board Short for tote board, on which odds, betting pools, and other information are displayed.

Blue Ribbon Fair Award USTA board – Lower case unless part of a proper name. (The Ohio State Medical Board voted against an increase, but the board later reneged on its promise.) board of directors boat race Slang for a fixed race.

Bobble A bad step away from the starting gate, usually caused by the track surface breaking away from under a horse’s hooves, causing it to duck its head or nearly go to its knees.

Bobblehead doll bog spavin A filling with excess synovial fluid of the largest joint of the hock, called the tarsocrual joint.

Bolas bolt Sudden veering from a straight course, usually to the outside rail.

Bomb(er) A winning horse sent off at extremely high odds.

Bone graft Using bone taken from one part of the body to promote formation of bone in another region.

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    Horses-Store.com - Scratches : A horse officially entered for a race but not permitted….