Studbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….

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Silver plated necklace with cowboy boot Horses-store.comStudbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….

INTRODUCTION GENERAL APPEARANCE ANGLO ARABIAN ARABIAN PONY ARABIAN RIDING PONY ARABIAN WARMBLOOD Photo Gallery PARTBRED ARABIAN QUARAB THE ARABIAN STOCK HORSE JUDGING IN-HAND Derivative Arabians Comparative Table 4 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 -3- INTRODUCTION An Arabian Derivative is a horse derived from Pure Arabian bloodlines and those of another breed.

Ideally, the progeny will display desirable characteristics and qualities of both the Arabian and the other breed.

There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia: • • • • • • • Anglo-Arabian Arabian Pony Arabian Riding Pony Arabian Warmblood Partbred Arabian Quarab Arabian Stock Horse To be registered as an Arabian Derivative a horse must trace in at least one line to a Pure Arabian horse registered as such in a recognized studbook for Pure Arabian horses.

The registry for which it will be eligible will depend on the other breed or breeds in its pedigree.

Unlike some other breed societies, which allow for Abreeding up@ from crossbred to purebred status, the AHSA does not allow for Arabian Derivatives to be upgraded to Pure Arabian status.

Many Arabian Derivatives are eligible for multiple breed registration, for example as Partbred Welsh or Partbred APSB Ponies, with various Warmblood breed societies, with the Australian Riding Pony Stud Book or the Australian Stock Horse Society.

The registration will depend on the criteria established by those breed societies.

Arabian Derivatives are also horses of many colours, so that many are also eligible for registration in registries specific to Palominos, Buckskins, Appaloosa and Pinto.

Australia=s first Arabian Derivative registries were established in 1949 for Anglo Arabians and Part Arabians.

The Arabian Pony registry was created in 1971.

The Arabian Warmblood registry was approved in 1989 followed by the Arabian Riding Pony registry in 1990.

In 2003, the Quarab and Arabian Stock Horse registries were approved.

The Arabian Derivative registries, which allow for the formal registration and recognition of crossbred horses of Arabian descent, are relatively new compared with the long history of the Pure Arabian breed, but crossbreeding Arabian horses is not new.

For centuries horse breeders and users have found that mixing Arabian blood with that of other equines results in an improved animal for a variety of purposes.

Many other breeds freely acknowledge the contribution of Arabian blood in their makeup.

The English Thoroughbred, the Trakehner, the English Riding Pony, the Morgan and the Standardbred are a few examples.

Two uniquely Australian breeds, the Australian Pony and the Australian Stock horse, can point to a strong Arabian influence.

An Arabian Derivative should be a quality riding horse or pony.

Individual animals will differ greatly in appearance depending on the amount of Arabian blood in their pedigree, the contribution made by their other breed ancestors, and the purpose for which they have -4- been bred.

However, the overall impression should be of a sound, balanced, free-moving and beautiful saddle horse.

Horse breeders have long identified and valued the characteristics that the Pure Arabian can contribute in the breeding of a quality riding horse or pony.

These include: • Quality limbs B with dense flat bone, a long forearm to short cannon ratio in the forelimbs, large flat knees and hocks, clearly defined tendons running parallel to the cannon/shannon bones; • Well-shaped hooves which are tough-walled, with large frogs and wide, relatively low heels well able to support the body weight, • Longevity and good health, • A kind and generous nature, • Intelligence, • Fertility, • Beauty B especially as shown by a large eye and intelligent expression, • Frugality B the ability to keep well on the minimum of feed and to do well and perform even if water is short, • Stamina B a strong, vigorous constitution, • Lightness and freedom of movement, • Refinement and quality, seen especially in the fine silky mane and tail hair, a reduction of feather and a fine short coat.

GENERAL APPEARANCE Arabian Derivatives, because they are crossbred horses, vary enormously in appearance.

They range from tiny fine-boned ponies of 11 hands or less to big-boned Warmblood crosses standing over 17 hands.

Irrespective of their height and whether they are derived from Arabian blood crossed with Pony, Thoroughbred, Warmblood or even Draught blood, each Arabian Derivative should present as a balanced, sound riding horse.

The form of the horse B its conformation B is closely related to its function B its movement.

A well-conformed horse, whatever its size, will usually have the well balanced and smooth-flowing paces required of a quality saddle horse.

Whatever its size, a quality saddle horse will display the following characteristics.

These characteristics should be evident in any Arabian Derivative horse.

Head and Neck The size of the head should be in proportion to the size of the body.

An overly long or large head is undesirable. • The eye should be large and expressive, kind, calm and intelligent. • The head should be well-set on to the neck, with a clearly defined gullet. • The neck should flow smoothly into a clearly defined wither. • There should be a slight natural arch to the neck from the wither to poll, so that the neck looks longer on top than below.

Body and Legs • -5- • • • • • • • • • • The shoulder should be long and sloping, with the angle being as close as possible to 45 degrees.

The ribs should be well-sprung, the girth deep and the chest well muscled, exhibiting ample substance in relation to the height and bone of the horse.

The loins should be short and close-coupled and the croup long and gently sloping.

The front legs should be set perpendicular to the body, with the elbows set clear of the body allowing free movement from the shoulder.

The forearm should be long and the cannon short, with the ideal ratio being 2:1.

Pasterns should be of medium length, with their angle matching that of the shoulder.

The hind legs should also be set perpendicular to the body, so that the back of the hock and fetlock joints is directly underneath the point of the buttock.

The hocks should be well let down, the gaskins well muscled and the stifles low and set clear of the body.

Tendons in the legs should be clearly defined and run parallel to the bones.

Hooves should be well shaped B rounded in front and slightly more pointed behind.

They should slope at the same angle as the pastern and have wide, open and relatively low heels.

Hoof walls should be strong and hard. Movement • In all of its paces the Arabian Derivative horse should show free, smooth and forward going movement, with strong driving hock action. -6- ANGLO ARABIAN.

Definition of Breeding An Anglo-Arabian horse is one derived exclusively from horses of Arabian and Thoroughbred breeding, irrespective of the proportions thereof, PROVIDED THAT: i) Arabian horses so used must be registered in the Australian Arabian Stud Book or in the stud book of a recognized Arabian breed Society.

Ii) Thoroughbred horses so used must be registered in the Australian Stud Book or in some other stud book recognized by the AHSA as being acceptable for Thoroughbred horses, or must trace directly through both parents to horses that are so registered.

Iii) Horses representing a blend of Arabian and Thoroughbred blood in any proportion, when inter-bred or when back crossed to either parental breed to produce Anglo Arabian horses shall themselves be registered in some other recognized Society stud book and/or register for Anglo Arabian horses.

Appearance The Anglo-Arabian is an elegant, balanced and refined horse.

When viewed in profile, the overall appearance is of a square, with the length of rein in direct proportion to the length of body which, in turn, is in direct proportion to vertical height.

While an Anglo should display strong bone and substance, there should be no coarseness.

Head and Neck • • • • • • • The head is refined and chiseled in appearance, with highly veined skin and fine hair.

The profile may be straight or slightly concave.

The eyes are large and expressive and set relatively low in the head.

The ears are thin- edged, neatly set, with their length in proportion to the length of the head B neither small and pony-like or large and overly long.

The muzzle is fine, with a long mouth, and the jowl is deep and distinct.

The head is well set on to a long, elegant neck, with a clearly defined poll and matching arch of throat.

The neck is lightly arched and wither well defined. — Height and Colour • • • Any height is acceptable and horses under 15 hands should not be discriminated against in judging.

Anglo Arabians are horses of solid colour B bay, black, brown, chestnut and grey.

The Arabian influence may impart Aloud@ white markings B long stockings and broad blazes B which should not be discriminated against in judging. Movement • • • The Anglo Arabian in motion exhibits smooth, flowing paces.

The walk is ground covering and rhythmical The trot is stylish and elevated, but without high knee action.

The hock action is vigorous and the hocks are carried well under the body.

The trot shows a strong forward thrust and the heels of the forefeet touch the ground prior to the toes The canter is light and smooth, with the forehand naturally elevated.

Clear impulsion should be shown at all paces. • • Presentation Anglo Arabians are usually presented for judging in hand as show hacks.

Manes and forelocks are plaited.

Tails are banged and either plaited or pulled.

English in-hand show bridles or halters are usually used, although Arabian show halters are acceptable. -8- ARABIAN PONY.

Definition of Breeding An Arabian Pony is one derived exclusively from horses of Arabian and Pony blood irrespective of the proportions thereof, PROVIDED THAT: i) Arabian horses so used must be registered in the Australian Arabian Stud Book or in a studbook of a recognized Arabian breed society.

Ii) Ponies so used must be registered in the Australian Pony Stud Book or in some other stud book recognized by the Society as being for pure bred ponies.

Ponies approved by the Australian Pony Stud Book or Welsh Pony and Cob Society of Australia for the purpose of breeding purebred ponies shall be accepted as purebred ponies by the Society.

Iii) Horses representing a blend of Arabian and Pony blood in any proportion, when inter-bred or when back crossed to either parental breed to produce Arabian Ponies shall themselves be registered in the Arabian Pony section of the AHSA Register or be registered in some other recognized society=s stud book and/or register for Arabian Pony horses.

The Australian Pony Stud Book is the oldest Breed Society in Australia.

The Stud Book is sectioned into Australian Ponies, Shetland Ponies, Welsh Mountain and Welsh Ponies; other Ponies such as Connemara, Icelandic, Norwegian, and New Forest are also registered.

The majority of Arabian Ponies registered by the AHSA are the progeny of Pure Arabians and either Australian or Welsh Ponies.

However, any APSB registered pony breed can be used in an Arabian Pony breeding programme.

Appearance Head and Neck • • • • • The head is short and deep and its size is in proportion to the ponys body size.

The head is wedge shaped B broad between the eyes and dished or straight in profile.

The eyes are large and expressive.

The ears are small.

The head is well set on to a moderately long neck, which is naturally crested and with clearly defined throatlatch. Body and Legs • • • • • The body should be strong and sturdy, exhibiting excellent rib-spring.

The back should be short, but not too broad, with strong, well-muscled loins.

The croup should be slightly rounded.

The tail, which is usually thick in texture, should be set level with the back or slightly lower.

The size of the hooves should be in proportion to the pony=s body and should match the slope of the pastern.

They should not be small, boxy or upright. -9- • Arabian Ponies may show some feathering on their legs. Height and Colour • • • Arabian Ponies may be any height but are preferred not to exceed 14 hands.

Those bred from Welsh Cob or Connemaras may well exceed 14 hands, but should show additional bone and substance in proportion to their height.

Arabian ponies may be solid or dilute colours, roan, grey or broken colours.

Blue eyes are acceptable. Movement • • • • Arabian ponies should exhibit a free, forward, crisp walk.

The trot should show elevation and strong flexing hock action.

The canter should be light and flowing, with ample impulsion.

A short choppy stride is not acceptable. Presentation • • • • The manner of presentation for in-hand judging is variable.

Arabian Ponies may be shown with free manes or tails or may have manes and forelocks plaited, and tails banged and plaited or pulled.

Arabian Ponies of Welsh Pony origin are usually not clipped or plaited.

Fetlock hairs (feathers) are usually not trimmed.

Arabian Ponies may be shown in English style show halter or bridles or in Arabian show halters. 10 — The Arabian Riding Pony is elegant and fine limbed and resembles the scaled down version of the Anglo Arabian, exhibiting features that reflect its genetic background of Arabian, Thoroughbred and Welsh Pony.

The balance and proportion of the Arabian Riding Pony is that of a fine, elegant riding type.

Head and Neck • • • • The head is fine and short, either slightly dished or straight in profile, with a fine muzzle, bold intelligent eyes and small ears.

The neck is long, lightly muscled and elegantly arched with head well set on.

The throatlatch is fine, curved and clearly defined.

Stallions are usually crested, but a thick blocky neck is not acceptable.

Arabian Riding Ponies display a longer, leaner neck than other ponies. Body and Legs • • • • • • • The body is smooth and lightly framed with well-sprung ribs and a deep girth.

The back is strong, not too broad and is well coupled.

The wither must be smooth but clearly defined.

The croup is long, deep and rounded.

The tail is fine, well set on and carried naturally away from the body, but without extreme elevation.

Riding Ponies are fine-coated, with finely textured mane and tail hair.

They show no feathering on their legs.

Legs should be fine and clean, with no sign of coarseness.

Joints should be large, clean and flat.

Feet should be in proportion to the body, with wide open heels.

Flat or upright boxy hooves are not acceptable. Height and Colour • • Colours are usually solid, with bay, brown, black, chestnut and grey predominating.

However dilutes, roans and broken colours are acceptable, as are blue eyes.

Arabian ponies may be any height but are preferred not to exceed 14.2 hh. Movement. • • • • The Arabian Riding Pony should display free forward movement with a stride that is long, very smooth and light.

The front hooves should land where they are pointing in mid-stride and the hind legs should track well up and over-step the front footfalls.

The movement is powerful and ground covering, but is flatter and shows less knee elevation than other ponies.

Impulsion must be shown at all paces. Presentation Arabian Riding Ponies are Show Ponies.

Traditionally these ponies are plaited up with tails banged and pulled or plaited, and shown in bridles or show halters in-hand. 12 ARABIAN WARMBLOOD.

Definition of Breeding The Arabian Warmblood Horse is derived exclusively from horses of either Arabian and Warmblood breeding or Arabian, Warmblood and Thoroughbred breeding irrespective of the proportion thereof, PROVIDED THAT i) Arabian horses so used must be registered in the Australian Arabian Stud Book or a studbook of a recognized Arabian breed society.

Ii) Thoroughbred horses so used must be registered in the Australian Stud Book or in some other stud book recognised by the AHSA as being acceptable for Thoroughbred horses or must trace directly through both parents to horses that are so registered.

Iii) Warmblood horses so used must be registered as a Warmblood in the Warmblood section with a Warmblood Society recognized by the AHSA as being for Warmblood horses.

Iv) Horses representing a blend of Arabian and Warmblood breeding or Arabian, Thoroughbred and Warmblood breeding in any proportion, when inter-bred or when back crossed to either parental breed to produce Arabian Warmblood horses shall themselves be registered in the Arabian Warmblood section of the AHSA Register, or be registered in some other recognised Society=s stud book and/or register for Arabian Warmblood horses.

Appearance The Arabian Warmblood is a well-balanced symmetrical horse combining sound conformation with substance and elegance.

Head and Neck • • • The head should present a noble air, with a kind, intelligent expression and usually dark eyes.

Its size should be in proportion to the size and strength of the horse.

The profile may be straight or dished.

Ears may be thicker and longer.

The neck is long, naturally arched and muscular, with a well-defined, clean gullet.

Stallions are crested but a thick, heavy or short neck is not acceptable. Body and Legs • • • • • • The body is deep with well-sprung ribs and capacious heart room.

The medium length back is broad, with strongly muscled short loins.

The hindquarters are powerful, long from the point of hip to point of buttock, well rounded with strong muscling.

The tail should be set so that it flows smoothly from the croup and is carried well away from the body.

It may be carried with a slight elevation.

The cannon bone measurement, taken directly below the knee, should be in the range of 20-25 cm.

The feet should be in proportion to the height and body size of the horse.

They should be relatively large, rounded and with wide, open heels. Height and Colour 13 • • Height is variable but preferably should exceed 15.2 hh.

All Colours are acceptable but the majority of Arabian Warmbloods are black, brown, bay, chestnut or grey.

Broken coat patterns and dilute colours are less common Movement • • • • • At all paces the stride should be long, smooth and fluid.

The overall impression should be of a horse which naturally carries itself in an uphill and elevated manner.

The walk is free and forward.

The trot is light and elastic, showing suspension and elevation with a strong, driving hock action.

The canter is bold and ground covering and shows great impulsion, as does the gallop. Presentation.

The Arabian Warmblood is shown with a plaited mane, with or without white dressage clips/tape and plaited or pulled and banged tail.

A bitted bridle or English-type show halter is used. 14 — • Height is variable, although the majority fall within the range of 13.2 hands to 15.2 hands.

Some individuals will fall above or below this height range. Movement • • • • The walk is free and smooth, with a ground-covering overtrack.

The trot is extravagant and floating.

The canter is light and springy All paces are free and forward going, exhibiting impulsion and the capacity to change direction easily and smoothly. Presentation.

Part Bred Arabians may be shown with free mane and tail, or mane plaited and tail plaited or pulled and banged.

They may be shown in an English show bridle or halter or an Arabian show halter. 16 QUARAB Definition of Breeding A Quarab horse is one derived exclusively from horses of Arabian and Quarter Horse breeding or Arabian and Paint breeding or Arabian, Quarter Horse and Paint breeding, where the proportion of Arabian blood shall be not less than 12.5% PROVIDED THAT: i) Arabian horses so used must be registered in the Stud Book of the Arabian Horse Society of Australia Ltd or in the stud book of a recognised Society.

Ii) Quarter Horses so used must be registered in the Stud Book of the Australian Quarter Horse Association or in a Quarter Horse Stud Book recognised by the Arabian Horse Society of Australia Ltd as being for Quarter Horses or must trace directly through both parents to horses which are so registered.

Horses approved by the Australian Quarter Horse Association for the purpose of breeding Stud Book Quarter Horses shall be accepted as Studbook Quarter Horses by the Arabian Horse Society of Australia Ltd.

Iii) Paint Horses so used must be registered in the Stud Book of the Paint Horse Association of Australia or in a Paint Horse Association recognized by the Arabian Horse Society of Australia Ltd as being for Paint Horses.

Iv) Horses representing a blend of Arabian and Quarter Horse or Arabian and Paint blood or Arabian, Quarter Horse and Paint blood when inter-bred or when back crossed to one of the parental breeds to produce Quarab horses shall themselves be registered in the Quarab section of the Register of the Arabian Horse Society of Australia Ltd or be registered in some other recognised Society stud book and/or register for Quarab horses.

V) The mature height shall be a minimum of 14 hh.

Appearance.

A Quarab is bred to produce a good-looking, versatile horse that is equally comfortable in the English show ring or as a Western performance horse.

A Quarab combines the beauty, quality, athletic ability, endurance and intelligence of the Arabian with the substance, strength, powerful muscling, cattle sense and cool mind of the Quarter horse.

Head and Neck • • • • The Quarab has an attractive head with a distinctive jowl and good breadth between the eyes.

The ears are neat, the eye large and kind and the expression bright The neck should be well shaped, not overly long and never short.

The neck set is usually lower than a pure Arabian, but the shoulder should still be long and sloping. Body and Legs • • The Quarab should be relatively compact, with a strong top line and powerful hindquarters.

The hindquarter should be larger and more heavily muscled than that of the Pure Arabian or the Part Arabian.

The tail set lower than that of the Pure Arabian. 17 • • • • The gaskins should be heavily muscled and well defined, the stifles low and set clear of the body above large well let down hocks.

Forelegs should be straight and have particularly well muscled forearms with strong, large and flat joints and free elbows.

Feet should be hard of a good shape with open heels and somewhat larger than the normal Quarter horse feet.

The Quarab, while being elegant but never >cobby= should still have strong bone as it is bred to be a tough all rounder.

Its elegance should be combined with considerable substance, giving the impression of strength and athleticism. Height and Colour • • • • The typical Quarab is a quality horse of around Galloway size (14 B 15hh.) There is no upper height limit but at maturity the Quarab must be a minimum of 14 hh.

The Quarab can be any colour.

Broken colour coat patterns, spotted patterns and dilute or roan colours are equally acceptable as is any pattern of white markings.

Any eye colour, including blue, is acceptable Movement • • • • The Quarab should move straight, with good impulsion from behind.

While it is a good mover, covering plenty of ground, the Quarab has flatter movement than the Pure Arabian, with less knee action.

The Quarab may travel with its head lower than many Arabians, because of the lower neck set.

Often the poll will be level with the wither, when the horse is walking, jogging( trotting) or loping(cantering) The lope or canter is particularly important in a Quarab.

It should be flat, efficient, naturally well balanced and comfortable. Presentation Because the Quarab is used successfully in both English and Western disciplines it can be presented with a free mane and tail, or plaited, or with a pulled mane which may be banded, and a banged tail.

An English bridle or Arabian style show halter, or a western show halter or bridle are all acceptable in led classes. 18

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    Horses-Store.com and Studbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….
    Horses-Store.com - Studbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….
    Horses-Store.com and Studbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….
    Horses-Store.com - Studbook : There are seven Arabian Derivative registries in Australia Anglo Arabian….