The judge may disqualify an exhibitor for broken equipment

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Blue Lanyard with Horse print - Gifts Horses-store.com The judge may disqualify an exhibitor for broken equipment

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Judges may ban equipment that is questionable or any legal equipment that has been gimmicked and appears to have given unfair advantage to any contestant. 11. Judges and contestants should be aware that some legal equipment may be entirely too severe for certain timid horses and that the most severe legal equipment may provide only marginal control for others. 12. Under ordinary conditions, equipment should not break during the performance, nor should it be changed after the class starts, except on permission from the ringmaster or judge.

The judge may disqualify an exhibitor for broken equipment. 13. The judge is the final authority related to handling of stock for roping events.

If intentional rough handling is deter- 13 mined or if an exhibitor refuses to use legal equipment or uses altered legal equipment resulting in its failure, the exhibitor may be disqualified by the judge. Exhibitor Attire The standards of attire apply to all 4-H Horse Shows.

Western Attire A.

A long or short sleeve white, button shirt or blouse with collar (t-shirts are not acceptable, tuxedo shirts are acceptable) B.

Dark blue western style denim jeans and belt C.

Western hat or any style ASTM/SEI approved headgear— Caps are not allowed.

Hats are optional for speed events.

D.

Western boots—Western style lace-up boots are acceptable.

Riding tennis shoes are not allowed.

E.

No silver or metal decorations, pins, scarves, or other adornments F.

Chaps, vests, gloves and similar accessories are prohibited.

Spurs are optional in performance events.

English Attire–Hunt Seat Attire A.

Riders must wear boots, breeches, coat, and hunt cap B.

A hunt hardhat cap or a hardhat derby is acceptable.

All colors are acceptable with preference for traditional conservative colors.

C.

Coats should be any tweed or melton (conservative wash jackets in season) acceptable for hunting D.

High English boots or jodhpurs and jodhpur or paddock boots E.

Long or short sleeve shirts with ties or chokers are preferred.

Choker pins are acceptable.

F.

Gloves are optional.

Saddle Seat Attire Formal or informal saddle suits are acceptable.

Ties are required and gloves are optional, but preferred.

A.

Informal—Conservative solid colors are preferred.

Solid colors include: black, blue, gray, green, beige or brown with matching jodhpurs (white jacket in season) and derby or soft hat.

B.

Formal—Solid colors are: dark gray, dark brown, dark blue, or black tuxedo-type jacket with collar and lapels of the same color, top hat, jodhpurs to match and gloves or dark colored riding habit and accessories.

All colors acceptable, but preference is for traditional, conservative colors.

Properly worn ASTM/SEI approved headgear is strongly recommended for the exhibitors in any and all events and any time the rider is mounted. Showmanship Showing a horse at halter requires discipline and precision by the handler and the horse.

The class objective is to show the horse at its best advantage with the minimal attention drawn to the showman.

Because the event is exacting in its demands, junior exhibitors are required to use a definite pattern that teaches the proper maneuvers for showing.

Senior showmen should be more advanced in their knowledge, 14 and therefore be able to incorporate the correct technique into any pattern the judge may call.

Only Senior Showmanship classes may involve switches or changes of horses by participating youth.

In 4-H Horse Projects, all breeds of ponies, light horses, mules, draft, or miniature horses may be used.

Although 4-H has general standards, judges should recognize showmanship competence using the standards of the breed in hand.

Showmanship Tack Correct tack does not build points, however, incorrect tack can result in lower placings.

Western Horses are to be shown in halter • • Halter—may be leather, rope or nylon.

Must be clean and adjusted to fit.

Lead—should be six to seven feet long, neat and inconspicuous.

The judge may penalize an exhibitor for excessive or abusive use of chain lead.

Bridles—snaffle (with or without drop nose-band), Pelhams, or full bridle.

Lead—on full bridles: option to show off either snaffle or curb; on Pelhams: with four reins, option to show off either set, non-leading rein to be draped over withers in both situations. — 50 pts 10 pts Total 100 pts Draft Horse Showmanship Stallions under eight months of age or mares and geldings of any age are eligible for show.

The horse should be presented in a thrifty, well-cared-for condition, neither thin nor excessively fat.

The animal should be clean.

Tails may be natural or docked, braided or left long, but fit to the proportions of the horse.

Manes may be rolled and decorated.

Feet may be shod or unshod, but should be properly trimmed and clean.

Black or natural hoof paint is acceptable.

Halters and leads may be of leather, nylon or rope and should be clean and fitted to the horse.

Show sticks and bridles will be allowed.

Class Procedure Horses will enter the ring at the trot and line up side-by-side at the direction of the ring steward.

Horses will be pulled from the line, walked to the judge or ring steward, walked to the opposite end of the arena (to the ring steward or judge), turned, and trotted back to the starting point.

The turn at the far end of the arena should not be over the horse’s hocks, but a slightly widened arc that results in the horse facing the opposite direction in line with the judge and ring steward when the turn is completed.

The exhibitor should concentrate on keeping the horse on a straight path between the judge and ring steward for as long as possible but still leave room for the turn.

Turns should always be away from the exhibitor when possible and/or feasible.

After showing your horse on the move, stop the horse and set the horse up.

Return to the line after the judge excuses you.

Horses should be shown with all four feet positioned correctly under the body while in line.

The judge will closely inspect and may handle each horse.

A trailer (person to assist with moving the horse) with or without a whip is permitted.

The trailer should cross to the opposite side prior to the turn and should never get between the judge and the horse when the horse is in line, but should stand behind the exhibitor some distance away and may assist in keeping the horse alert.

Deviations from this description may be necessary, and will be announced prior to the beginning of the class. 17 Western Performance Stock Seat Equitation, Western Riding, Reining, Trail Western Performance classes recognize the rider’s ability to ride a horse correctly and to use various aids required for a horse to perform basic maneuvers.

Riders will be judged on basic position in saddle; position and use of hands, legs and feet; ability to control and show the horse; and suitability of horse to rider.

The rider’s ability to execute maneuvers correctly shall be considered more important than the horse’s performance.

Grooming standards consistent with showmanship.

Tack/Equipment Saddles —Must be sized to the rider and of western type.

Curb Bits A.

Maximum shank length overall is 8½ inches.

Shanks can be fixed or loose.

B.

Mouth pieces must have smooth, round bars or unwrapped metal, and measure between 3/8 and 3/4 inches in diameter when measured 1 inch from cheek.

They may be inlaid, but must be smooth or latex wrapped.

Nothing may protrude below the mouthpiece (bars), such as extensions or prongs on solid mouthpiece.

Mouthpiece may be 2 or 3 pieces.

If 3 piece, a connection ring of 1¼ inch or less in diameter, or a connection flat bar of 3/8 to 3/4 inch (measured top to bottom with a maximum length of 2 inches), it must lie flat in horse’s mouth.

C.

Ports may not exceed a maximum of 3 inches in height.

Rollers (3/8 to 3/4 inch diameter) and covers are acceptable.

Grazing, broken mouthpieces, halfbreeds and spades are standard.

Snaffle Bits and Bosals A.

Horses are to be shown in a true snaffle (conventional O-ring, egg butt or D-ring) or bosal.

The bit must have a smooth broken mouthpiece.

The mouthpiece must be at least 5/16 inch in diameter, measured 1 inch from the corner of the mouthpiece.

Curb straps are optional.

When used, the straps must be loosely attached, meet the 4-H requirements and be attached below the reins.

B.

Bosals must be of braided leather, braided rawhide or rope.

Absolutely no iron under the jaw, regardless of how padded or taped.

Jaquimas are acceptable.

C.

Bits with gag action are illegal, except in speed and timed events. Legal Bosal 18 Examples of Legal & Illegal Bits Hackamore Bits All mechanical hackamores are illegal except in speed events (barrel racing, pole bending, roping).

Examples of Mechanical Hackamore Bits Curb chains and straps Curb chains and straps must be flat with a minimum width of onehalf inch.

Round leather curb straps, braided knots, or flat braided curb straps are illegal.

Any twisted chain or strap is illegal. 19 Examples of Legal Curb Chains & Straps (except in barrel racing, pole bending, roping) — 26 Western Riding No horse shall be allowed in more than one Western Riding class per show.

In Western Riding, judging is based on the quality of gaits and lead changes.

Gait is the even cadence that is at the start and finish of the pattern.

Leads should be changed precisely, easily and simultaneously both hind and front at center point between markers.

The horse should have a relaxed head carriage, showing response to the rider’s hands with a moderate flexion at the poll.

Horses may be ridden with light contact or on a reasonably loose rein.

The horse should cross the log at a jog and then lope without breaking gait or radically changing stride.

The rider will be judged on basic position in the saddle, lightness of hands, use of aids, and smoothness of pattern.

Penalties The following are penalties (from least to most severe): • tick or light touch of log, hind legs skipping or coming together during lead change, non-simultaneous lead change (cross firing) break of gait at walk/jog up to two strides, out of lead for more than 1 stride, hit/roll log, splitting the log out of lead prior to or after the marker, break of gait at the lope, simple lead change, extra lead change, starting pattern out of lead, not performing gait or stopping within 10 feet, failure to start loping within 30 feet of log, break of gait at walk/jog for more than two strides out of lead beyond next designated change area (failure to change leads), blatant disobedience (kick out, buck) • • • A No Score (which is a disqualification) can be awarded if contestant or horse break any of the 4-H Horse Show Guide General Rules and if contestant or horse knock over markers, completely miss the log, have a refusal (stopping and backing two strides), take four steps with the front legs, rearing, schooling or failure to start the lope before the end marker, broken pattern, four or more missed lead changes.

Pattern Clarification The exhibitor’s pattern will begin when they cross the starting line.

On completion of the pattern, the exhibitor will ride towards the judge. • The eight small circles in the Western Riding pattern represent markers (cones are recommended but barrels or kegs are acceptable).

These should be separated by a uniform distance of not less than 30 feet.

The distance may be altered if local arena conditions are too small for the above distances.

The open rectangle represents a log obstacle.

It need only be high enough to break the animal’s stride as they proceed over it.

The long and sometimes twisting line indicates the direction of travel and the gaits at which the animal moves. The dotted line (…) indicates the walk. The dashed line (—) indicates the jog. The solid line (—) indicates the lope. The zig-zag line (/ \/ \/ \/) indicates the back.

The solid black rectangle indicates where lead changes should occur. • • • 27 Western Riding Pattern 1.

Walk to first marker.

At first marker, jog to and over the log. 2.

After crossing the log, transition to a lope in the left lead and lope around the end. 3.

First flying lead (line change), to the right. 4.

Second flying lead (line change), to the left. 5.

Third flying lead (line change), to the right. 6.

Fourth flying lead (line change), to the left.

Lope around the end markers. 7.

First crossing change, to the right. 8.

Second crossing change, to the left. 9.

Continue loping over the log. 10.

Third crossing change, to the right. 11.

Fourth crossing change, to the left. 12.

Lope up the center, stop and back. 13.

Walk to the judge for examination/comments. Reigning No horse shall be allowed in more than one reining class per show.

Each contestant is to perform the required pattern individually and separately.

All horses are to be judged immediately upon — • Optional Obstacles • • • • • • • • Water hazard (ditch or shallow pond).

Hobble or ground-tie horse.

Carry object from one part of the arena to another.

Back horse through “L” shaped course (minimum of 28 inches).

Handle slicker.

Dismount and lead horse over obstacles no less than 14 inches and no more than 24 inches in height.

Pull an object toward the horse with lariat or rope.

Others upon request of the official judge. 36 Example Gate for Trail Class English Performance Classes (Saddle Seat Equitation, Hunt Seat Equitation, Hunter Equitation Over Fences and Pleasure Driving) Equitation classes recognize the rider’s ability to ride a horse correctly and to use various aids required for a horse to perform basic maneuvers.

Riders will be judged on basic position in saddle; position and use of hands, legs and feet; ability to control and show the horse; and suitability of horse to rider.

The rider’s ability to execute maneuvers correctly shall be considered more important than the horse’s performance.

Bits An English snaffle (no shanks), Kimberwicke, Pelham, and/or full bridle (with 2 reins), all with cavesson nosebands, and plain leather brow bands, must be used.

In regard to mouthpieces, nothing may protrude below the mouthpiece.

On broken mouthpieces only, connecting rings of 11/4 inch or less in diameter, or connecting flat bar of 3/8 to 3/4 inch (maximum length of 2 inches) and that lie flat in the horse’s mouth are acceptable.

Smooth round, twisted, double twisted, slow twist, straight bars, or solid mouthpieces with a maximum of a 1 inch high port are acceptable.

All mouthpieces must be a minimum of 5/15 inch in diameter, snaffles to be measured 1 inch from cheek.

English bits of any style featuring cathedral or donut mouthpieces or rough, sharp material are not acceptable.

Optional Appointments Spurs of the un-rowelled English type, (slip-ons are acceptable), and riding crops or whips are optional. 37 Prohibited Tack Draw reins, martingales, tie-downs, hackamores and horse leg boots of any type are illegal.

No leg gear allowed in Equitation over Fences ( Junior & Senior). Saddle Seat Equitation Saddle Seat Equitation Tack Bridles – Full bridles preferred.

Weymouth, Kimberwicke or Pelham bits are acceptable when used with double reins.

Saddles – English flat saddles are required.

Saddles may be of show, cut back, or Park type.

Forward seat, flat saddles with knee rolls, and western saddles are prohibited.

Class Conditions and Rules Riders should convey the impression of effective and easy control.

To show a horse well, the rider should show him/herself well.

Ring generalship shall be taken into consideration by the judges.

A complete picture of the whole is of major importance.

Hands should be held in an easy position, neither perpendicular nor horizontal to the saddle, and should show sympathy, adaptability, and control.

The height the hands are held above the horse’s withers is a matter of how and where the horse carries its head.

The method of holding the reins is optional, except that both hands shall be used and all reins must be held up at one time.

Bight of the rein should be on the off side.

To obtain proper position, rider should place him/herself comfortably in the saddle and find his/her center of gravity by sitting with a slight bend at the knees but without use of irons.

While in this position, adjust leathers to fit.

Irons should be placed under the ball of the foot (not under the toe or ‘home’), with even pressure on the entire width of the sole and center of the iron.

Foot position should be natural (neither extremely in nor out).

Basic Riding Position • The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.

The rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.

The irons should be placed under the ball of the foot and not under the toe or against the heel.

Foot should be held in a natural position, neither too far out nor in.

Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms in a straight line with body.

The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit.

The height the hands are held above the withers is determined by how and where the horse carries its head.

The method of holding reins is optional; however, both hands must be used, and all reins must be picked up at one time.

Bight of rein must be on the off side. • • • • • 38 — 46 Hunter Equitation Over Fences Class Conditions There will be a minimum of four obstacles; horses are to make a minimum of eight jumps.

At least one warm-up jump should be provided.

Height of obstacles (measured from the ground to the center of jump) Minimum Maximum Juniors Seniors 18” 24” 30” 36” There will be NO jump offs.

Course must be posted at least one-hour before scheduled time of class.

Seniors are to have at least one change of direction.

All hunters will be permitted to walk the official course (without horse) immediately prior to the class.

Note: Only exhibitors will be allowed in the ring during the final walk-through.

No coaches or advisors are allowed on the course.

Scoring Riders will be judged on seat, hands, and ability to control and show the hunter over fences.

Particular emphasis shall be placed on the rider’s basic position in the saddle, including the strength of the leg position and suppleness of hand.

The rider shall also be judged on the smoothness of performance and manners of the horse.

An even hunting pace is preferred.

Judges must penalize unsafe jumping and bad form over fences, whether the fence is touched or untouched.

At combination, the faults committed at each obstacle are considered separately.

In case of a refusal or run-out at one obstacle in a combination, the competitor may rejump the entire combination.

Knockdowns, refusals and touches should be penalized.

Three refusals result in elimination.

Fall of the horse and/ or rider results in elimination.

Knockdowns – When a horse attempts to jump an obstacle and knocks down the obstacle, or any portion of it, it is considered a knockdown and a penalty of four faults is given. (Exception: When a horse knocks down all or any portion of an obstacle while refusing, it is not to be scored as a knockdown, but given the correct number of faults for that refusal.) a.

Knockdowns of obstacles or the cause of any portion of an obstacle, standard or wing to be knocked down by any portion of the horse, rider, or equipment: four faults.

No penalties for touch of obstacle, standard or wing with any portion of the horse, rider or equipment.

B.

Circling once upon entering the ring and once upon leaving is permissible.

Any additional circling or unnecessary showing of fence to horse: three faults.

C.

First refusal (anywhere on course): three faults.

D.

Second refusal: six faults.

E.

Third refusal: elimination.

F.

A fall of horse and/or rider: elimination.

G.

Failure to enter the ring within one minute of being called: elimination. 47 h.

Failure to complete course, going off course, jumping out of order: elimination.

I.

In cases of broken equipment, the rider will be disqualified.

In case of loss of shoe, rider may either continue without penalty or be eliminated.

J.

At a brush element, the touch of the brush only without touching the framework is not scored as a fault.

K.

Charging will be penalized.

Suggestions for Jumping Jumps should be a minimum of 48 feet apart, but all intervals must be in multiples of 12 feet (eg – 48 feet and 60 feet apart from the point of landing to the point of take-off in the next jump).

The distance from take-off or landing from the jump is usually equal to or up to 1 ½ times the height of the jump.

For a jump set at 24 inches, this would be 24 – 36 inches from the fence.

The take-off distance may be taken into consideration when spacing jumps.

Example Courses for Jumping 48 Pleasure Driving Please Note: Pleasure Driving horse height will be included with the official State 4-H Horse Show entry. (Classes will be split by horse size (miniatures, ponies, horses, draft), if necessary.

For safety reasons, judges will be instructed to choose the Grand and Reserve Champions from across the four separate classes and not have the different horse height classes in the ring together.) A team hitch will be treated as one horse, one entry.

Horses that meet the characteristics of draft breeds will be considered Draft.

Attire: Attire must be neat and clean.

Proper attire for either the Western or English Divisions may be worn.

Chaps or spurs are illegal.

Exhibitors may wear rainwear or inclement weather apparel if conditions warrant.

Tack: Vehicle –Suitable for style of driving.

Pleasure type two or four-wheeled cart or buggy.

Cart or buggytype wheels a minimum of 19-inches in diameter and with one or two seats.

No stirrup-type carts or sulkies may be used.

Harness: A collar or breast collar harness and standard bridle with snaffle or curb bit may be used.

If curb bit is used, curb strap or curb chain must meet judge’s approval and requirements as stated for Western Division.

Whip: Drivers will carry a whip in hand.

Optional Tack: Dash and basket cover for vehicle is optional.

Check reins, blinkers, breeching, martingales and cavesson nosebands are optional.

Whips suitable to the vehicle and with whip holder are suggested.

Prohibited Equipment: No wire curbs, regardless of how padded or taped, may be used.

Class Condition: Exhibitors shall compete in the pleasure driving class with their animals safely harnessed to an appropriate vehicle.

Junior exhibitors are allowed to have an adult accompany them.

In the senior division, no other person is permitted in the vehicle while the horse is being exhibited.

No pets shall be allowed in such vehicle during exhibition.

The SD 4-H State Horse Show recognizes three (3) styles of pleasure driving.

The three styles are Pleasure Type, Stock Horse, and Draft Harness.

The Pleasure Driving Class will have three divisions to accommodate the three styles.

Each division will follow General Driving Rules with the addition of the appropriate division guidelines.

General Pleasure Driving Rules for Single and Team (To be adhered to by all pleasure driving divisions.) Purpose To demonstrate that the horse is a pleasure to drive.

Preparation Practice: The youth should gain experience driving at a walk, trot, back, and other maneuvers generally used with driving horses.

Horses: The horse(s) are to be judged on their performance with and suitability for the youth driver.

The horse (s) must be clean, groomed, and presented in the most positive manner (horses are not judged for conformation in this class).

Harness: Harness must be safe, clean, and properly adjusted.

Vehicle: Vehicle must be clean, safe and in good repair.

Attire: Youth must dress in clean, 4-H appropriate clothing and carry a whip.

Hats, neckties and gloves are acceptable and optional. 49 Posture: The driver must be straight in the back, sit back in the seat, the feet reaching to a foot rest with the elbows slightly forward of the body.

Whip in hand.

Position: The driver is usually seated on the right to access the brake at all times.

Final Preparation 1. 2. 3. 4. The driver must check the hitch for appropriate adjustments for safe driving.

The driver must achieve appropriate tension on the lines and have the whip in hand.

The driver should know the location of the judge and the ring steward.

An experienced driver may be on the seat beside a junior driver.

If assistance is given, either via the lines, whip or voice command the driver will be penalized. Contestants will be judged on the following: Judging begins when the unit enters the ring.

The driver will be evaluated throughout the class on their posture, use of hands to gather and adjust lines, use of whip, and use and position of arms and legs.

The driver’s arms should be forward of the body while the horses work as a smooth consistent unit.

Drivers will be evaluated on their ability to command horses along the rail at a walk and trot, to reverse direction, to line up, to stop, to stand, and to back.

A figure eight or swing (cut) may be requested at the discretion of the judge.

Class Procedure 1. 2. Enter the ring with the unit bearing to the right at a safe speed.

When all units are in the ring, you should space yourself and follow the directions of the ring steward.

Always have sufficient clearance between your unit and the preceding unit to stop or make adjustments.

Use of whip may be necessary.

Correct posture should be maintained at all times.

Upon direction you execute the gaits appropriate for your division.

Pleasure Type and Stock Horse drivers may pass on the inside track.

Draft Harness drivers do not pass.

At the direction of the ring steward, the driver will reverse direction on the diagonal assuming an inside path until the rail is clear.

Upon direction the units will be asked to line up in the center of the ring.

This should be executed with a smooth and controlled stop.

Horses and vehicle should be brought to a complete square stop without abruptness or veering.

At the halt, horses should stand attentive, motionless and straight with the weight evenly distributed over all four legs and be ready to move off the slightest indication from the driver.

After stopping, the horses should stand quietly.

The driver may relax the lines but should hold them in anticipation of starting, whip in hand.

A header is optional.

At the request of the judge the driver will rein back.

Rein back is defined as a backward movement in which the legs are raised and set down simultaneously in diagonal pairs with the hind legs remaining well in line.

To be performed in two parts: A.

The horse must move backward at least four steps in an unhurried manner with head flexed and straight, pushing the vehicle back evenly in a straight line.

The driver should use quiet aids and light contact. 3. 4. — • • • • • • • • Penalties • The judge will not flag the contestant out until time is recorded.

The judge is to flag time, then flag the contestant out if the run is not legal.

Knocking over a barrel will cause an automatic five second penalty per barrel.

Should the barrel be knocked over and it sets up on opposite end, the five second penalty will be assessed.

Wearing a hat is not mandatory; however, if a hat is worn into the arena and it falls off, the contestant will receive a five-second penalty.

Dropping a whip or bat in the arena during the performance will result in an automatic two second penalty.

Not following the cloverleaf pattern will result in a no time.

A broken pattern shall be defined as breaking forward motion to retrace tracks to finish the pattern and/or passing the plane of the barrel on the off side.

Example: Should a contestant run by a barrel and have to back up or turn around and retrace their tracks, this would be considered a broken pattern.

Failure to follow the course or crossing over the start/ finish line prior to completion of the pattern will be considered a broken pattern and will result in a no time.

Any assistant helping barrel racers will not be allowed to go past the plane of the main arena gate when they are entering the arena or the contestant will be disqualified. • • • • • • 54 Instructions for Barrel Racing Course The contestant may start on either the right or left barrel. • Right run barrel pattern: At a signal from the starter/ timer, such as the word “go” or “raising the flag”, the contestant will go to barrel #1, turn to the right around the barrel, complete a 360 degree turn, then proceed to barrel #2, turn left around the barrel with another turn of 360 degrees, go on to barrel #3, turn left around the barrel and sprint the horse to the finish line.

Left run barrel pattern: The barrel course may also be run to the left.

For example, the contestant will start to barrel #2, turn left around this barrel, proceed to barrel #1, turn right, then ride to barrel #3, turn to the right again and sprint to the finish line. — • • • • • • • • Penalties The judge will not flag the contestant out until time is recorded.

The judge is to flag time, then flag the contestant out if the run is not legal. • • Knocking over a pole will cause an automatic five second penalty per pole.

Wearing a hat is not mandatory; however, if a hat is worn into the arena and it falls off, the contestant will receive a five-second penalty.

Dropping a whip or bat in the arena during the performance will result in an automatic two second penalty.

Not following the pole bending pattern will result in a no time.

A broken pattern shall be defined as breaking forward motion to retrace tracks to finish the pattern and/or passing the plane of the pole on the off side.

Example: Should a contestant run by a pole and have to back up or turn around and retrace their tracks, this would be considered a broken pattern.

Also, if a pole is knocked down and the contestant does not follow the weave pattern around the original base position of the fallen pole, it is considered a broken pattern. • • 56 • Failure to follow the course or crossing over the start/ finish line prior to completion of the pattern will be considered a broken pattern and will result in a no time.

Any assistant helping pole benders will not be allowed to go past the plane of the main arena gate when they are entering the arena or the contestant will be disqualified. • Instructions for Pole Bending The contestant may start to the right or to the left of the first pole and then run the remainder of the pattern as follows: • Run down to the sixth pole and turn the horse back, weave/bend in and out of the poles until the first pole, turn the horse back to weave/bend in and out to the sixth pole, run back to the finish line. Pattern Standards The course must be measured exactly.

The following standards should be used to set the pole bending pattern (refer to diagram): • • • • • • • Minimum of 25 yards (75 feet) between start/finish line and arena fence to allow for stopping.

The distance from the starting line to the first pole must be 21 feet.

The poles must be spaced 21 feet apart.

The end pole must be at least 20 feet from the fence.

Poles must be 6 feet in height with no base larger than 14 or less than 12 inches in diameter.

Poles must be set on top of the ground.

Poles must be straight in line. 57 Roping There will be no video replay for classes that have arbitration reviews.

Judge’s ruling is final.

The calf or steer belongs to the contestant when he calls for it regardless of what happens, except in the case of the following: mechanical failure, animal escapes from the arena, or the judge rules that the contestant was fouled by the barrier.

In the event of any of the above failures, the contestant will receive the original animal back with a lap- and- tap (no barrier used) start.

Time already accumulated will be added to time used to complete the qualifying run.

If time is not recorded, the contestant will receive a 10-second penalty for any jump or loop used.

A contestant must be on his/her horse and his/her horse must break the plane of the barrier with his/her calf/steer breaking the plane of the score before he/she is allowed to compete.

Once the performance has started, the score line and length of box will not be changed.

The catch pen gate will be closed while the contestant is roping. Breakaway Roping The time limit is 30 seconds.

All penalties will be assessed after the run.

Ropers have the option of coming out of either box.

Tack & Equipment Two loops will be allowed if two ropes are carried.

The second rope must remain tied until used.

Two loops cannot be thrown unless two are carried—A roper who does not carry two loops is not allowed to run again.

Class Rules • Ropes must be tied to the saddle horn with nylon string tied at the knot on the rope.

The rope should have a knot at the end with no tail.

The rope may not be run through the bridle, tie down, neck rope or any other device.

A white flag must be attached to the knot end of the rope.

The calf’s head must pass through the loop.

The loop must draw down up on any part of the calf’s body behind the head.

If the field judge flags out a roper that still legally has one or more loops coming, the judge may give the same calf back, lap and tap, plus time already lapsed and any barrier penalties.

If time was not recorded, the contestant will receive a 10-second penalty for any loop used.

Contestant will only be granted remaining loops, not additional loops. — The time limit is 45 seconds.

All penalties will be assessed after the run.

Animals used for this event should be inspected and eliminated if objectionable.

There shall be two timers, a barrier judge, and a field flag judge, with the time to be taken between the two flags.

Arena conditions will determine the score.

The length of score is to be set by the arena director and time event director or spokesman, if present.

Tack & Equipment Dally team roping contestants must have saddle horns wrapped from base to cap with a firm material that will withstand the pressures of the dally.

The horn wrap functions to provide traction to keep the dally from slipping and burning the hand or severing fingers and/or thumbs.

Slick or unwrapped saddle horns are prohibited.

The most widely used wrapping is a wide band of rubber cut from an inner tube looped around the horn, stretched, and twisted and then looped back around the horn until a firm, uniform covering is achieved.

Each contestant is allowed to carry only one rope.

No tied ropes allowed.

Class Rules • All changes in lists of roping order to split horses, etc., must be made before any stock is loaded into the chutes.

Once stock is loaded, a roper must rope in the order listed.

Header will start behind a barrier and must throw the first loop at the head.

Heeler must start from behind the barrier line.

Time will be taken when the steer is roped and both horses are facing the steer in line with ropes dallied and tight.

Each horse’s front feet must be on the ground.

Each team is allowed three total throws.

Roper must dally to stop steer or change steer’s direction.

A ‘dally’ requires one complete turn around the horn.

Both ropers must be mounted when time is taken.

Steer must be standing up when roped by head or heels.

No foul catches can be removed or adjusted by hand.

If the field judge flags out a team that legally still has one or more loops coming, the judge may give the same steer back lap and tap, plus time already lapsed and any barrier penalties.

If time was not recorded, a ten-second penalty will be assessed for each loop already thrown.

Contestant will only be granted remaining loops, not additional loops.

There will be 4 legal catches: • Both horns. • Half a head. • Around the neck. • Heeler only – Any heel catch behind both shoulders if the rope goes up the heels. • • • • • • • • • • • 60 Penalties The judge will not flag the contestant out until time is recorded.

The judge is to flag time, then flag the contestant out if the run is not legal. • • A 10-second penalty will be given for beating or breaking the barrier.

A 5-second penalty will be given for catching only one hind foot.

Not releasing the rope from the hand when roping the steer.

Abusive treatment of steer or horses.

The rope is dropped or broken.

Any part of the pusher breaking the plane of the chute before the calf releases the barrier.

The front foot of the steer being in the header’s loop when the header dallies and switches direction.

Heeler roping one or both front hooves in the heel loop. *If the hooves fall out of the loop by the time the field judge drops the flag, time will be counted.

The heeler roping the steer before it is turned and moving forward.

A heel loop thrown in the switch is called a crossfire and is illegal.

Illegal catches: • Hondo passes over one horn, loop over the other. • Loop crosses itself in the head catch (figure eight).

Qualification/Partners A dally team roper can attempt to qualify once, but may rope a second time to help another person qualify.

However, they must use their first qualifying attempt results as their basis for qualifying for the State 4-H Horse Show.

The roper must qualify at an official county 4-H Horse Show to enter the event at the State 4-H Horse Show.

Contestants may only attempt to qualify with other 4-H members officially entered in the team roping.

A parent, adult volunteer/leader or Junior 4-H Member will not be allowed to participate.

Violation of this rule will result in disqualification.

State 4-H Horse Show – If there is only one dally team roper or an odd number of dally team ropers from a county, they can partner with a team member from another county.

The new partner must count this as an event for the State 4-H Horse Show.

This means a participant can team with any other roper who is qualified and teamed with someone else from his county/Field Education Unit.

Participants are still encouraged to rope with someone within their county/Field Education Unit. The following actions will result in a no time/ disqualification: • • • • • • • • 61 Youth in Action Youth HORSE Training Requirement: *Youth participating in the 4-H Youth in Action events (Quiz Bowl, Hippology, Public Speaking and Judging) are required to complete Youth HORSE Training as stated.

Participants need not be enrolled in the Horse Project.* Dress code for all Youth In Action events are as follows: White button up shirt, can be short or long sleeved, boots and denim jeans. State 4-H Horse Awards • State Hippology Contest • Juniors—First place team members each awarded Gold Medal.

Second Place team members each awarded a Silver Medal.

Top 4 individuals each awarded a plaque. • Seniors — First place team members awarded a trip scholarship to the Western National Roundup in Denver, Colorado.

Second place team members each awarded a Silver Medal.

Top 4 individuals each awarded a plague. • State Horse Quiz Bowl • First Place team members awarded a trip scholarship to the Western National 4-H Roundup in Denver, Colorado. • Second Place team members will each receive a Silver Medal. — 63 • • The moderator will continue reading questions (and bonus questions if applicable) until all questions have been asked.

If a question is thrown out either due to poor reading by the moderator or a decision of the referee judges, it will be replaced by another question so that the total number of questions to be asked remains consistent.

Either team captain or coach, or the moderator may call for a “time out” for clarification of a rule, to permit replacement of a team member, or to allow for unexpected problems.

These “time outs” may be called only after a question has been answered and before the start of the next question.

The protest of a question or answer to a question may be made only by a team captain or coach and then only at the time a particular question is read or the answer is given.

The moderator and the referee judges will consider the protest, and their decision in all cases is final. • • Scoring • Only those contestants who have participated in three or more matches will be considered for the top individual awards.

The three high match scores for each individual will be used in cases where individuals participate in more than three matches.

Ties for individual awards will be broken on the basis of: first, high average score for the entire contest; second, high individual match scores; and third, total number of points earned. • • Resources • • • • • • • • Illustrated Dictionary of Equine Terms – New Horizons Equine Education Center.

Alpine Publications.

The Horse, 2nd Edition – Evan, Borton, Hintz, and Van Vleck.

W.H.

Freeman and Company.

Feeding and Care of the Horse (2nd Edition) – Lon Lewis.

Williams and Wilkins.

Horse Industry Handbooks – American Youth Horse Council; PRIMEDIA Equine Youth Leaders Manual – American Youth Horse Council, PRIMEDIA Equine AQHA Rulebook (2009, 57th Edition) – Only show rules will be used, Sections 442-480.

SD 4-H Horse Project Show Guide 4-H Rodeo Rules & Regulations Please refer to the Horse Classic section in this website for more detailed contest information: www.westernnational4hroundup.org. HIPPOLOGY CONTEST 4-H Horse members are provided an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and expertise in equine science.

National Contest Eligibility • States are invited to enter one (1) team of no more than four members.

On teams consisting of four 65 members, all will compete; however, the lowest score in each phase will be dropped.

For those teams consisting of three members, all members’ scores will count in determining individual and team awards.

Only Senior 4-H members age 14 to 19 (as of January 1 of the current 4-H year) are allowed to participate in national competition.

If a member of the winning team does not meet this requirement, they will be replaced by the next highest individual participant for the national competition. • 64 — • The Contest Examination Phase —will include: • • • Written Exam Projected slides to be identified as to breed, color, color pattern, activity, proper appointments, etc.

Anatomy which may include external, skeleton, internal organs, parts of gastrointestinal tract, male and female reproductive organs, detailed anatomy of the foot and detailed lower limbs. Station Phase —this phase will consist of a series of stations or tables where all contestants will respond to the requirements of the station.

Members will be allowed two (2) minutes at each station.

Examples of stations which may be used include: • Identification of: • Various types of saddles (actual or pictures) and parts of saddles. • Tacks, bits, bridles, horse shoes and parts of shoes.

Tools and equipment, and assembly of specific parts of various pieces of equipment.

Grains and forages used in equine rations including various forms of methods of preparation. • Internal and external parasites based on actual samples, pictures, life cycle charts and/or damage caused. • Blemishes and unsoundnesses. • Age of equines based on teeth. • • Use of pulse rate, respiration rate, temperature, dehydration, anemia, etc., to assess horse health.

Measurements such as, but not limited to, wither height, shoes size, girth, collar size, gullet width, seat length of saddle, etc.

May be required. Judging Phase —contestants will be required to place at least two classes, consisting of one halter and one performance. 65 Team Problems Phase • • Each team will be presented with the same problem (s).

Each team will have equal time to discuss among themselves the problem, immediately after which they will have to present an oral solution or series of suggested procedures relative to the problem.

Each team member is encouraged to participate in the oral presentation.

Evaluation will be based on the understanding of the problem, completeness of the response, the probability of success of the solution or procedures, and the logic used in making the oral response.

The official may ask questions of any or all of the team members to clarify the presentation.

Team problem scores will not be included in determining the rank of individuals but will be added to the team scores from the other three phases to determine overall team standings.

Examples of possible team problems: • Balancing a horse’s ration. • Farm management recommendations for specific horse operations (ie, breeding, training, boarding, nursery, lay-up, etc.) • Considerations for the establishment of a new horse facility (stable to be used for a specific purpose). • Recommendations for selecting, locating, and purchasing horses for specific uses. • Behavior problems—causes, management of and corrections. • Training and conditioning programs—equipment, schedules, methods, nutrition, problem avoidance. • Breeding and/or leasing contracts—specific clauses for insurance, liability, payments, care, termination, transport, etc. • Teaching lessons in horse management (specific subject to be announced) to a group of 9-11 year old beginner 4-H’ers: where, how long, how much information, handson experience, reinforcement, testing evaluation, will be considered. • Explanation of use or assembly of specific equipment. • Demonstrate skill or ability to use specific equipment.

Tie-Breaking All ties overall, individual and team, will be broken using the following sequence: • • • Examination scores Station scores Judging scores • • • • • Ties within any phase are to be broken using the overall score first and then the same sequence as above.

If further tie breaking is needed, the scores at each station, in order may be used.

Resources • • • • • EQUUS Magazine, glossary only, Decembember 2004 – November 2008 The Horse, 2nd Edition – Evan, Borton, Hintz, and Van Vleck.

W.H.

Freeman and Company.

Feeding and Care of the Horse (2nd Edition) – Lon Lewis.

Williams and Wilkins.

Horse Industry Handbooks and Youth Leaders Manual – American Youth Horse Council EQUUS Illustrated Handbook of Equine Anatomy, Vol. 2 66 STATE 4-H HORSE JUDGING CONTEST National Contest Eligibility • Only Senior 4-H members age 14 to 19 (as of January 1 of the current 4-H year) are allowed to participate in national competition.

Top four Senior individual judges earn the trip to national competition.

If a member has participated as a 4-H Horse Judge at nationals previously, he/she will be replaced by the next highest individual participant for the national competition.

Contestants (including team alternates) may participate in only one national contest (ie quiz bowl, judging, hippology, etc.) per year.

The contestant, his or her county 4-H staff member, and the State 4-H Leader must certify as follows on the application form or an accompanying memo: “This contestant has not participated in postsecondary coursework in the subject area of the national competition, nor has he or she participated in training for post-secondary competition in the subject area of the national 4-H competition.” • • Teams • Beginner, Junior and Senior 4-H members may participate in the South Dakota State 4-H Horse Judging Contest.

However, only senior members age 14 and older are allowed to participate in national competition.

Each county may enter one judging team in each age division.

Each county may enter an unlimited number of judging individuals.

Teams may have no less than three and no more than four members.

If a county team cannot be fulfilled, a Field Education Unit (FEU) Judging team will be allowed.

Eg—If one county in the unit cannot fill a team, the other counties in the FEU could join together to form a team. • •

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