The pirouette and half pirouette 1

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Bracelet charm - horse [fits Pandora bracelet] Horses-store.com The pirouette and half pirouette 1

d.

Renvers e.

Half pass.

The aim of movements on two tracks is: 1.

To improve the obedience of the horse to the co-operative aids of the rider; 2.

To supple all parts of the horse, thereby increasing the freedom of his shoulders and the suppleness of his quarters, as well as the elasticity of the bond connecting the mouth, the poll, the neck, the back and the haunches. 3.

To improve the cadence and bring the balance and pace into harmony.

Leg yielding.

The horse is almost straight, except for a slight flexion at the poll away from the direction in which he moves, so that the rider is just able to see the eyebrow and nostril on the inside.

The inside legs pass and cross in front of the outside legs.

Leg yielding should be included in the training of the horse before he is ready for collected work.

Later on, together with the more advanced movement of shoulder-in, it is the best means of making a horse supple, loose and unconstrained, for the benefit of freedom, elasticity and regularity of his paces, and the harmony, lightness and ease of movements.

Leg yielding can be performed “on the diagonal”, in which case the horse should be as near as possible parallel to the long side of the arena, although the forehand should be slightly in advance of the quarters.

It can also be performed “along the wall”, in which case the horse should be at an angle of 35 degrees to the direction in which he is moving. [see diagrams 5 and 6] 87.

LATERAL MOVEMENTS 1) The aim of lateral movements is to develop and increase the engagement of the hindquarters and thereby also the collection. 2) In all lateral movements – shoulder-in, travers, renvers, and half pass – the horse is slightly bent and moves with the forehand and the quarters on two different tracks. 3) The bend or flexion must never be exaggerated so that it impairs the balance and fluency of the movement concerned. 4) In the lateral movements, the pace should remain free and regular, maintained by a constant impulsion, yet it must be supple, cadenced and balanced.

The impulsion is often lost, because of the rider’s preoccupation mainly in bending the horse and pushing him sideways. 41 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 42 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 SHOULDER-IN.

The horse is slightly bent round the inside leg of the rider.

The horse’s inside foreleg passes and crosses in front of the outside leg; the inside hind leg is placed in front of the outside leg.

The horse is looking away from the direction in which he is moving.

Shoulder-in, if performed in the right way, with the horse slightly bent round the inside leg of the rider, and at the correct tracking, is not only a suppling movement, but also a collecting movement, because the horse, at every step, must move his inside leg underneath his body and place it in front of the outside leg, by lowering his inside hip. [see diagram 1] TRAVERS.

The horse is slightly bent round the inside leg of the rider.

The horse’s outside legs pass and cross in front of the inside legs.

The horse is looking in the direction in which he is moving [see Dressage Ireland Ltd.agram2] RENVERS.

This is the inverse movement in relation to Travers, with the tail instead of the head to the wall.

Otherwise the same principles and conditions are applicable as at the Travers. [See diagram 3] HALF-PASS.

The Half-pass is a variation of Travers, executed “on the diagonal” instead of “along the wall”.

The horse should be slightly bent round the inside leg of the rider in order to give more freedom and mobility to the shoulders, thus adding ease and grace to the movement, although the forehand should be slightly in advance of the quarters.

The outside legs pass and cross in front of the inside legs.

The horse is looking in the direction in which he is moving and should maintain the same cadence throughout the whole movement.

In order to give more freedom and mobility to the shoulders, which adds to the ease and grace of the movement it is of great importance, not only that the horse is correctly bent and thereby prevented from protruding his inside shoulder, but also to maintain the impulsion, especially the engagement of the hind leg. [See figure 4] In the canter, the movement is performed in a series of forward sideways elevated strides. 88.

The turn on the haunches.

The pirouette and half pirouette 1.

Turn on the haunches from halt to halt. (180 degrees).To maintain the forward tendency of the movement, 1 or 2 forward steps at the beginning of the turn are permitted.

During the turn, the horse moves around a point whereby the inner hind leg remains close to that point while stepping around the point in a clear four beat rhythm.

The front legs and the outside hind leg move around the inner hind leg which is lifted and lowered in rhythm, clearly in the direction of the centre of gravity and meets the ground in the same spot or only slightly in front thereof.

After the completion of the turn, the horse is brought back to the track in a forward sideways manner before the second halt.

The horse returns to the track without the hind legs crossing.

When executing the turn, the horse should be flexed in the direction of the turn. 2.

Turn on the haunches from walk (180 degrees) The same criteria apply as for the turn on the haunches from halt to halt.

The only difference is that the horse does not come to a halt before and after the turn.

Before starting the turn, the steps of the walk should be shortened. 43 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 3.

The Pirouette. (Half Pirouette is a circle [half circle] executed on two tracks, with a radius equal to the length of the horse, and the forehand moving around the haunches.

A] Pirouettes (half pirouettes) are usually carried out at collected walk or canter, but can also be executed at piaffe.

B] At the pirouette (half pirouette) the forefeet and the outside hind foot move round the inside hind foot, which forms the pivot and should return to the same spot or slightly in front of it, each time it leaves the ground.

C] At whatever pace the pirouette (half pirouette) executed, the horse, slightly bent to the direction in which it is turning, should, remaining ‘’on the bit’’ with a light contact, turn smoothly round, maintaining the exact cadence and sequence of footfalls of that pace.

The poll stays the highest point during the entire movement.

D] During the pirouette (half pirouettes) the horse should maintain his impulsion, and never in the slightest way move backwards or deviate sideways.

If the inside foot is not raised and returned to the ground in the same rhythm as the outside hind foot, the pace is no longer regular.

E] In executing the pirouette or half pirouette in canter, the rider should maintain perfect lightness of the horse while accentuating the collection.

The hindquarters are well engaged and lowered and show a good flexion of the joints.

F] An integral part of the movement is the canter strides before and after the pirouette.

These should be characterised by an increased activity, straightness and collection before the pirouette; and the movement having been completed, by the balance being maintained as the horse proceeds.

G] The quality of the pirouettes (half pirouettes) is judged according to the suppleness, lightness, cadence and the regularity, and to the precision and smoothness of the transitions; pirouettes (half pirouettes) at canter are judged according to the balance, the elevation and the number of strides (6 – 8 for a full pirouette, 3 – 4 for a half pirouette, are desirable). 89.

The Passage a] This is a measured, very collected, very elevated and very cadenced trot.

It is characterised by a pronounced engagement of the hindquarters, a more accentuated flexion of the knees and hocks, and the graceful elasticity of the movement.

Each diagonal pair of feet is raised and returned to the ground alternately, with cadence and a prolonged suspension.

B] In principle, the height of the toe of the raised foreleg should be level with the middle of the cannon bone of the other foreleg.

The toe of the raised hind leg should be slightly above the fetlock joint of the other hind leg.

C] The neck should be raised and gracefully arched with the poll as the highest point and the head close to the vertical.

The horse should remain light and soft, ‘’on the bit’’ and be able to go smoothly from the passage to piaffe and vice-versa, without apparent effort and without altering the cadence, with the impulsion always being lively and pronounced. 44 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 D] Irregular steps with the hind legs, swinging the forehand or the quarters from one side to the other, as well as jerky movements of the forelegs or the hind legs, or dragging the hind legs, are serious faults. 90 The Piaffe A] The piaffe is a highly collected, cadenced, elevated diagonal movement giving the impression of being on the spot.

The horse’s back is supple and elastic.

The quarters are slightly lowered; the haunches with active hocks are well engaged, giving great freedom, lightness and mobility to the shoulders and forehand.

Each diagonal pair of feet is raised and returned to the ground alternately, with an even cadence.

B] In principle, the height of the toe of the raised foreleg should be level with the middle of the cannon bone of the other foreleg.

The toe of the raised hind leg should reach just above the fetlock joint of the other hind leg.

C] The neck should be raised and arched, the head vertical.

The horse should remain, ‘’on the bit’’ with a supple poll, maintaining a light and soft contact on a taut rein.

The body of the horse should move up and down in a supple, cadenced and harmonious movement.

D] The piaffe must always be animated by a lively impulsion and characterised by perfect balance.

While giving the impression of being in place, there may be a visible inclination to advance, this being displayed by the horse’s eager acceptance to move forward as soon as it is asked.

Moving even slightly backwards, irregular steps with the hind legs, crossing of either the fore or hind legs, or swinging either the forehand or the quarters from one side to the other, are serious faults.

A movement with hurried, unlevel or irregular steps, without cadence or spring cannot be called a true piaffe. 91.

The Collection 1) The aim of the collection of the horse is: a) To further develop and increase the balance and equilibrium of the horse, which has been more or less displaced by the additional weight of the rider.

B) To develop and increase the horse’s ability to lower and engage his quarters for the benefit of the lightness and mobility of his forehand.

C) To add to the ease and carriage of the horse and make him more pleasurable to ride. 2) Collection is developed through the use of shoulder-in, travers, renvers and last, but not least, half pass and especially half halts. 3) Collection is, in other words, improved and achieved by engaging the hind legs, with the joints bent and supple, forward under the horse’s body by a temporary but often repeated action of the seat and legs of the rider, driving the horse forward towards a more or less stationary restraining hand, allowing just enough impulsion to pass through. 45 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 Collection is consequently not achieved by shortening the pace through a resisting action of the hand, but instead by using the seat and legs to engage the hind legs further under the horse’s body.

However, the hind legs should not be engaged too far forward under the horse, as this would shorten the base of support excessively, and thereby impede the movement.

In such a case, the line of the back would be lengthened and raised in relation to the supporting base of the legs, the stability would be impaired and the horse would have difficulty in finding a harmonious and correct balance.

On the other hand, a horse with too long a base of support, which is unable or unwilling to engage his hind legs forward under his body, will never achieve an acceptable collection, originated in the activity of the quarters.

The position of the head and neck of a horse at the collected paces is naturally dependent on the stage of training and, to some degree, on his conformation.

It should however, be distinguished by the neck being raised unrestrained, forming a harmonious curve from the withers to the poll, being the highest point, with the head slightly in front of the vertical.

However, at the moment the rider applies his aids in order to obtain momentary and passing collecting effort, the head may become more or less vertical. 92 The Submission / the impulsion 1.

Submission does not mean subordination, but an obedience revealing its presence by a constant attention, willingness and confidence in the whole behavior of the horse as well as by the harmony, lightness and ease he is displaying in the execution of the different movements.

The degree of submission is also manifested by the way the horse accepts the bridle; with a light and soft contact and a supple poll, without resistance to, or evasion of, the rider’s hands; not being either above the bit or behind the bit respectively. 2.

Putting out the tongue, keeping it above the bit or drawing it up altogether, as well as grinding the teeth and swishing the tail are mostly signs of nervousness, tension or resistance on the part of the horse and must be taken into account by the judges in their marks for the movement concerned, as well as in the collective mark for submission .

Straightness is also an important part of submission.

A horse is straight when the hind feet follow the tracks of the fore feet on straight and curved lines and when the horse shows equal and submissive bend in both directions.

The fulfilling of the main requirements / movements of a dressage test is a main criterion of submission. 3.

Impulsion is the term used to describe the transmission of an eager and energetic, yet controlled, propulsive energy generated from the hindquarters, into the athletic movement of the horse.

Its ultimate expression can be shown only through the horse’s soft and swinging back to be guided by a gentle contact with the rider’s hand. 46 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 — INDEX No.

RULE. 1.

Definition. 2.

Dressage Ireland Ltd.

Memberships. 3.

Horse/pony registration. 4.

Equine influenza vaccination. 5a) Graded classes. 5b) Confined classes. 5c) Unregistered classes 6.

Tests 6a) Freestyle and freestyle to music tests. 7.

Availability of tests. 8.

Points system. 9.

Grades of horses. 10.

Downgrading. 11.

Imported horses. 12.

Grading of horses training abroad. 13.

International competitions. 14.

Selection. 14a) Senior. 14b) Young riders. 14c) Juniors. 14d) Ponies. 15.

Rider categories 16.

Entries for regional and national shows. 17.

Declarations. 18.

Hors concours. 19.

Withdrawals. 20.

Refunds of entry fees. 21.

Starting times. 22.

Prize money and rosettes. 23.

Prize givings 24.

Equipment – The Rider. 2a) Dress. 24b) Hats. 24c) Breeches/ Jodhpurs. 24d) Gloves. 24e) Boots. 24f) Spurs. 24g) Whips. 24h) Tricolour. 25.

Equipment – The Horse. 25a) Saddles 25b) Saddle Covers 25c) Tricolour saddle cloths 61 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 25d) Bridles 25e) Permitted bits, tack and equipment. 25f) Nosebands 25g) Bit guards 25h) Other tack 25i) Fly fringes, gauze’s and ear covers 25j) Anti fly impregnated brow bands and insect repellant discs. 26) Warming up. 26.

Penalties for contravening the rules. 27.

Incorrect dress or equipment. 28.competitors conduct. 29.competitors responsibility 30.

Riding in collecting ring or practice arena/arenas. 31.commanders. 32.

Outside assistance. 33.

Entering arena before the signal to start. 34.

Execution of test. 35.

Para-equestrian dressage riders. 36.

Salute. 37.

Reins in one hand during test. 38.

Sitting and rising. 39.

Leaving the arena. 40.

Falling/dismounting during test. 41.

Resistance. 42.

Grinding teeth and tail swishing. 43.

Voice. 44.

Errors of course. 45.

Penalties for error of course. 46.

Errors of test. 47.

Time. 48.

Lameness. 49.

Scoring-Method. 50.

Scale of Marks. 51.

Guidelines for giving marks. 52.

Judges Sheets.

GENERAL RULES. 53.

Acceptance of the Rules 54.

Judges decision Final 55.

Objections. 56.

Conduct and discipline. 57.

Show accident book. 58.

Show incident book. 59.

Suspension 60.

Welfare. 61.

Doping Control – Riders Also see appendix 2 &3. 62 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 62.

Insurance. 63.

Liability ARENAS 64 20 x 40 & 20 x 60 arena plans. 65.

Layout 66.

Markers 67.

Inspection of Arenas NOTES ON THE INTERPRETATION OF DRESSAGE TEST SHEETS 68.

Turns and Circles 69.

Change of pace at a given marker 70.

Simple Change 71.

Give and Re-take the Reins/Stroke the Horses Neck 72.

Leave the Arena at A 73.

Free walk on a Long Rein 74.

Canter on a long rein 75.

Duration of Judging F.E.I.

DEFINITIONS OF PACES AND MOVEMENTS 76.

Object and General Principals 77.

The Halt 78.

The Walk 79.

The Trot 80.

The Canter 81.

The Rein Back 82.

The Transitions 83.

The Half-Halt 84.

The Changes of Direction 85.

The Figures 86.

Work on Two Tracks 87.

The Lateral Movements 88.

The Pirouette and Half Pirouette 89.

The Passage 90 The Piaffe 91 The Collection 92 The Submission/the impulsion 93.

The Position and Aids of the Rider 94.

The Training Scale JUDGES 95.

Appointments 96.

Foreign Judges 97.

Positioning of Judges 98.

Judging Restrictions 99 Standards at which Judges may officiate 63 DI Rulebook.

Valid 1 January 2012 Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 Notes for judges.

Doping and medication Incident and accident books. 64

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