This rule applies at all times during any 4-H horse event, activity or show

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Yellow Cream - For the Horse Horses-store.com This rule applies at all times during any 4-H horse event, activity or show

New or recently revised rules appear in boxes. (1) The Pennsylvania State 4-H Show, District Shows, Regional Production Shows, and County Round-ups or qualifying shows will be governed by the rules as stated in this book and any additional supplement(s) that may be distributed.

At all county, regional, and district shows, qualifying classes for the state show must follow state show rules with no additions, deletions, or modifications.

In order for an exhibitor to advance to the next show, the class must be conducted and the exhibitor must successfully compete at the qualifying show. (2) The State 4-H Horse Show Committee shall be the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee, plus any members appointed by the committee chairperson. (3) These rules are in effect for the 2012-2013 4-H horse show seasons.

Be sure to check for any change in the years after 2012, and any additional supplements that may be distributed. (4) Supplements to the rulebook will not be published on a regular basis.

Rule changes will be incorporated into the rulebook every two (2) years when a new rulebook is published.

Exception: supplements may be distributed in the event of a safety issue or other extenuating circumstance. (5) District, Area, and County Shows should put in place a committee structure that parallels those outlined in this Rule Book.

The rule books of the United States Equestrian Federation, the American Quarter Horse Association, and the American Driving Society were used as references in formulating certain of these rules. 1 General Rules 1.

It is obvious that, however complete rules may be, they never can cover all possible situations which may arise.

If a matter cannot be solved by interpreting the rules to the letter, the solution to be adopted by those responsible should lie in a principle which follows as nearly as possible the spirit of the rules. 2.

When the terms “prohibited”, “not permitted”, “mandatory”, “will”, “required”, “shall” or “must” are used in these rules, any competitor who fails to comply MUST BE DISQUALIFIED by the judge, unless another penalty is stipulated.

When the term “should” is used in these rules, and no penalty is prescribed, any competitor who fails to comply MAY BE PENALIZED by the judge. 3.

In the event of a dispute that is not covered in this Rule Book, the governing 4-H Horse Show Committee shall render a decision. 4.

The Show Committee’s decision is final in regards to a protest decision, rule violation interpretation and/or condition of the show grounds. 5.

In the event the Show Committee is not available, the Show Chairperson may render a decision and his/her decision is final in all decisions that the Show Committee would adjudicate. 6.

Whenever the words “horse” or “pony” appear, this includes all members of the equine family including mules and donkeys. 7. 4-H members must be enrolled with the county extension office in the 4-H Horse Project by June 1 of the current year to be eligible to show.

Pennsylvania 4-H Policy states that a 4-H member must be at least eight years of age and not have passed their nineteenth birthday before January 1.

Whenever this rulebook refers to June 1 the following applies: When June 1 falls on a business day, enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business.

If June 1 falls on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, then enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business on the next business day.

Counties may require earlier deadlines than noted in these rules for show entries and related paperwork.

County deadlines and requirements will apply as appropriate. 8.

All members, to be eligible to compete at the county level and further shows, must be enrolled with the extension office of the county in which they show, and complete appropriate requirements as determined by that county. 9.

Penn State encourages persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities.

If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or 2 have questions about the physical access provided, please contact your county extension educator in advance of your participation or visit.

Requests for accommodations should be made to the extension educator at least three weeks in advance of the event (See General Rule 29). 10.

The 4-H member should care for (feed, exercise, and handle) the animal the majority of the time.

Adults should not do the majority of the work.

The 4-H member may have appropriate involvement or assistance from an adult.

Adults may assist or ride horses if needed for safety reasons.

This rule applies to all 4-H events including but not limited to shows, clinics, mounted meetings, etc. 11.

A 4-H member may have animals in the following projects: Production, Performance, and Competitive Trail Riding.

Refer to Production Rules and Performance Rules in this rule book for specific information regarding the number of animals that may be enrolled.

If a member is enrolled in the Competitive Trail Riding project, the animal used may be either the same animal used for Performance or Production, or it may be an additional animal.

Performance, Production and Competitive Trail Ride animals must be enrolled at the extension office by June 1 in order to show or compete in the current year.

Refer to Production Rules for enrollment deadlines for Production animals, and refer to Performance Rules and the State 4-H Competitive Trail Ride entry procedures (distributed annually to extension offices) for further details. 12.

A 4-H member may not have a horse project or/projects in more than one Pennsylvania county. 13.

A horse or pony shown as a 4-H project cannot be shared by 4-H members unless they are from the immediate family or live in the same home.

Exceptions: 1.

Riders in the therapeutic division are exempt from shared horse limitations. 2.

A horseless 4-H member who shares a horse may participate in classes at county and district shows designed for shared horse members.

The horseless member is not eligible to participate in classes that qualify for the State 4-H Horse Show.

The horse’s owner retains the right to participate in these qualifying classes.

See Guidelines for Shared Horse Activities available from county extension offices and the 4-H Horse Program website. 14.

All horses and ponies at 4-H and open horse shows sponsored by 4-H or used in rides at public events must be inoculated for rabies at least 30 days prior to the event if this is the animal’s initial 3 inoculation. (This ruling includes mares taken to production events.) Re-vaccination is required annually.

Vaccination is required for all horses over six (6) months of age.

Events that are required to follow Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) health regulations may have more restrictive rabies vaccination requirements that will supersede 4-H Horse Show rules.

Foals born March 15 of the current year and later are exempted from the requirement that rabies vaccine be administered at least 30 days prior to the show date.

Mules/donkeys that will be in 4-H shows and ponies participating in 4-H pony rides must also be vaccinated.

The PDA will only recognize a rabies vaccination administered by a licensed veterinarian or under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

The exact form to be used for rabies vaccination verification is not specified.

We will accept any legitimate proof of vaccination provided by a licensed veterinarian that includes the veterinarian’s signature, date of vaccination, and name and/or description of the horse.

Acceptable forms of vaccination verification include, but are not limited to, standard rabies certificate, itemized bill signed by the veterinarian, or statement on business letterhead that is signed by the veterinarian.

Verification of vaccination needs to be kept for two (2) years. 15.

All horses over six (6) months of age must have proof of current negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) status for all Pennsylvania 4-H horse shows and events.

This rule includes all broodmares taken to production events.

Any federal or Pennsylvania state recognized test results for EIA will be acceptable to document negative EIA status.

Tests must be dated within 12 months of the show or event. 16.

All current federal, state, and/or PDA health regulations will apply as appropriate.

Events that are required to follow PDA health regulations may have more restrictive requirements that will supersede 4-H Horse Show rules. 17.

Exhibitors who observe an animal that may present a health hazard to other horses are asked to report the horse and/or its stall location to the Show Committee.

The official show veterinarian in consultation with the Show Committee shall be responsible for determining the health status of all horses.

Horses showing evidence of contagious diseases shall be removed by their owner from the show grounds at the direction of the Show Chairperson. 4 18.

If there is a known occurrence of an infectious disease in a certain area, show management in consultation with a veterinarian and Cooperative Extension personnel, may require additional testing of, or documentation for horses from affected area(s).

Upon the advice of the consulting veterinarian, state veterinarian, and/or extension veterinarian, show management may prohibit horses from participating in 4-H events if deemed appropriate to protect the health, welfare, and safety of participants and horses. 19.

All animals must be serviceably sound for competition purposes.

Animals must not show evidence of lameness or any other unsoundness that renders the animal unsuitable for competition as determined by the official show veterinarian, a veterinarian appointed by the show committee, or the show judge, if a veterinarian is not available.

Animals with complete loss of sight in one eye may be found serviceably sound at the judge’s discretion. 20.

Cruelty, rough handling, inhumane or unethical treatment of horses will not be allowed at any show.

The Stewards, Judge, or Show Committee may disqualify anyone mistreating an animal. 21.

Assistance or coaching from outside the ring may be penalized by the judge at his or her discretion. 22.

When an exhibitor, parent, guardian, 4-H leader, coach, agent, or representative acting on behalf of an exhibitor is guilty of unsportsmanlike or unethical conduct, the 4-H Horse Show Committee may require the 4-H member to return all trophies and ribbons, forfeit the transportation allowance, and may suspend the 4-H member involved from participation in 4-H horse shows or events for such a period as judged appropriate.

A parent, guardian, 4-H leader, coach, agent, or representative acting on behalf of an exhibitor, deemed guilty of unsportsmanlike or unethical conduct may also be prohibited from participation in 4-H horse shows or events for such a period as judged appropriate.

Persons deemed guilty of unsportsmanlike conduct may be expelled from the show grounds at the direction of the Show Committee.

The results of such committee action will be sent in writing to the appropriate Extension Director and county extension office.

This rule applies at all times during any 4-H horse event, activity or show. 23.

An exhibitor does not have the right to inspect the judge’s cards.

However, an exhibitor may request of the Show Committee or Stewards the reason for a decision.

At the proper time and place, the Show Committee may request the Judge to give his or her 5 reasons.

A judge is not to be approached by any exhibitor or person acting on behalf of the exhibitor with regard to any decision while judging or about to judge. 24.

At a show no judge may be approached by an exhibitor, parent, extension educator, 4-H leader or anyone acting on behalf of an exhibitor without first obtaining the permission of a Steward or the Show Committee.

Following a show, communication with a judge in regards to specific show issues is prohibited without obtaining permission from the Show Committee or Steward. 25.

In all 4-H sponsored shows/activities, all exhibitors 18 years of age or younger, including all 4-H exhibitors regardless of age, are required to wear properly fastened protective headgear which meets or exceeds current ASTM (American Society for Testing Materials) / SEI (Safety Equipment Institute) standards for equestrian use and carries the SEI tag.

Headgear must be properly fitted with harness secured and is required while riding or driving anywhere on the event grounds and in all classes except for Grooming and Showmanship and Miniature Horse In Hand Trail.

Headgear may not be modified in any manner, other than to adjust fit with pads supplied by the manufacturer.

Helmet covers may be used provided they can be removed for inspection of the helmet if necessary.

The show committee must immediately prohibit any exhibitor violating this rule at any time from further participation until such headgear is properly in place.

During a show class, if the show committee determines that the headgear is inappropriate and the exhibitor is in violation of the rule, the exhibitor will be disqualified from that class and immediately prohibited from further participation until appropriate headgear is properly in place.

It is the responsibility of the exhibitor, the parent or guardian, and the trainer of the exhibitor to see the headgear is worn at the appropriate times, complies with the appropriate safety standards for protective headgear intended for equestrian use, and is properly fitted and in good condition.

The show committee, show officials and volunteer leaders are not responsible for checking headgear worn for such compliance unless the appropriateness of such headgear is questioned.

Refer to the PA 4-H Horse Program Protective Headgear Policy Questions and Answers pamphlet for further clarification of the protective headgear rule. (Pamphlet available from county extension offices 6 or the 4-H Horse Program website.) Additional information on approved protective headgear is available at: www.seinet.org or www.usef.org The Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Program Development Committee, Pennsylvania State 4-H Horse Show Committee, and the Pennsylvania State University make no representation or warranty, express or implied, regarding any protective headgear, and caution exhibitors and their respective parents or guardians that death or serious injury may result despite wearing such headgear, as all equestrian sports involve inherent dangerous risk and as no helmet can protect against all foreseeable injuries.

In all classes the use of additional safety equipment is permitted, including a protective safety vest specifically designed for use in equestrian sport and any exhibitor may show with this equipment in any class without judging discrimination. 26.

A rider may not be fastened or attached in any manner to the horse or tack in any class. “Magic Seats” and rubber bands securing feet in stirrups are not allowed.

In any class, the judge, steward, or show committee may require the removal or alteration of any equipment which is unsafe or inhumane in his/her opinion. 27.

The judge may excuse any exhibitor due to concerns for the safety of any participant or horse in any class.

Safety concerns, including animal behavior issues, brought to the attention of the Show Committee should be addressed in an appropriate manner. 28.

The fall of a horse or rider in any class is cause for elimination with the following exception: In Contest Classes a fall or separation will be cause for elimination only if it occurs after the starting line and before the finish line.

Any horse that becomes detached from its handler/rider and is not under control by the handler/rider will be disqualified and excused.

The ring conduct of any exhibitor and/or their horse should not adversely affect the exhibition of any other exhibitor’s horse in the ring.

Exhibitors adversely affecting other exhibitors’ performance may be penalized or excused at the judge’s discretion. 29.

Any personal equipment (protective headgear, riding apparel, tack, mounting blocks or ramp, etc.) must be provided by the 4-H member and their parent and/or guardian. 30.

In case of broken equipment or loss of shoe, the exhibitor must continue without delay or be eliminated.

Exceptions as noted in “Classes 39, 40, 7 41 and 42, Working Hunters, and also in the Glossary, item 5. 31.

Failure to use required tack, equipment, or attire or the use of prohibited tack, equipment, or attire will be cause for disqualification.

The judge may penalize an exhibitor for the use of nontraditional or inappropriate tack or equipment at his/her discretion. 32.

Failure by the exhibitor to wear the correct number in a visible manner may result in a penalty at the judge’s discretion. 33.

If an exhibitor is disqualified, then he/she may be immediately excused from the arena at the discretion of show management and the judge. 34.

Dogs or other pet animals either leashed, or unleashed will not be permitted in any part of the Farm Show Complex during the State 4-H Horse Show.

This includes the spectator area of the arena and the entire stable area. 35.

Drugs & medication a.

No horse or pony may be shown in any class if it has been administered, in any manner, a forbidden substance.

A forbidden substance is any substance, including but not limited to stimulants, depressants, or local anesthetics which might affect the performance of a horse. (stimulants and depressants are defined as substances which stimulate or depress the circulatory, respiratory, or central nervous systems).

Also prohibited are any drugs and substances, regardless of how harmless or innocuous they might be, which by their very nature might mask or screen the presence of the aforementioned prohibited drugs, or prevent or delay testing procedures.

B.

The full use of modern therapeutic measures including phenylbutazone for the improvement and protection of the health of the horse is permitted, unless the treatment may also stimulate or depress the circulatory, respiratory, or central nervous systems.

C.

Horses in competition are subject to examination by a licensed veterinarian appointed by the Show Committee.

The examination may include physical, saliva, urine, and blood tests or any other tests or procedures necessary to effectuate the purposes of this rule.

Said veterinarian may examine any or all horses in a class or classes in the show.

D.

Should the chemical analysis of blood, urine, saliva, or other samples taken from the horse indicate the presence of a forbidden substance, this shall be prima facie evidence that a forbidden substance has been administered to the horse.

When a positive report identifying a forbidden substance is received from the testing laboratory, a 8 hearing will be held by the State Show Committee.

The 4-H member involved will be notified ten days prior to the meeting.

The 4-H member may attend the hearing at his/her option and may bring witnesses, sworn statements or other evidence in their behalf.

E.

The Show Committee may require the 4-H member to return all trophies and/or ribbons, forfeit the transportation allowance and may suspend the 4-H member and the horse or pony involved from competing in 4-H competitive events for a period of one year.

The result of said hearing will be sent in writing to the appropriate Extension Director and county extension office.

F.

Refusal to submit to the drug test will be interpreted as prima facie evidence of guilt.

G.

Any horse or pony exhibited that receives any medication which contains a forbidden substance shall not be eligible for competition unless the following requirements are met and the facts requested are furnished in writing. 1.

The medication must be therapeutic and necessary for the treatment of illness or injury. 2.

The horse must be withdrawn from competition for a period of not less than 24 hours after the medication is administered. 3.

The medication must be administered by a licensed veterinarian, if available and in his or her absence by the 4-H member or designated representative. 4.

Identification of medication; the amount, strength, and mode of administration. 5.

Date and time of administration. 6.

Identification of horse, its name, age, sex, color and entry number. 7.

Diagnosis and reason for administration. 8.

Statement signed by person administering the medication. 9.

Statement filed with Steward within one hour after administration or one hour after the Steward returns to duty if administration was at a time other than Show hours. 10.

Statement signed by the Steward and time of receipt recorded on the statement by the Steward.

H.

If the chemical analysis of the sample taken from a horse so treated indicates the presence of a forbidden substance, and all of the requirements of paragraph g.

Have been fully complied with, the information in said medication report and any other relevant evidence shall be considered by the hearing committee in determining guilt or innocence of the 4-H member charged under the provisions of this rule. 9 Show Committee Show Committees should refer to Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Show Management Guidelines and Horses, Safety and You – How to Work With and Around a Horse Safely. (available from County Extension Offices and the 4-H Horse Program website). 1.

The Show Committee shall be responsible for the operation of the show.

It shall be the duty of this committee to enforce all rules as set forth in this rule book. 2.

Show committees should consist of at least one or more persons experienced in horse show management.

It is recommended that show committees follow these or other acceptable guidelines as closely as possible at all 4-H horse shows. 3.

The Show Committee must address and take necessary action to ensure the safety of exhibitors, horses, spectators, and all show participants when planning and conducting shows. 4.

The Show Committee shall determine all Trail, Working Hunter and Equitation Over Fences courses and obtain approval from the judge prior to posting.

Courses must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

It is the judge’s responsibility in consultation with the Show Committee to provide patterns/tests for all other classes as appropriate.

Degree of difficulty of patterns/tests should be appropriate for age division. 5.

The Show Committee shall eliminate, without waiting for a protest, an improper entry of a horse or rider or driver. 6.

Show Committee members have the responsibility to alert the Show Committee Chairman or Steward of any rule violations or situations that may lead to a protest. 7.

The Show Committee shall determine the working order in individual performance classes. 8.

The Show Committee may require announcement of individual disqualifications in timed or scored events as they occur. 9.

The Show Committee shall weigh all facts and information pertaining to or regarding a protest, rule violation and/or error before rendering a decision. 10.

Clerical and/or mathematical errors, may be corrected by the Show Committee and/or in consultation with the Judge during a class or after a class has been placed, but no later than 30 minutes after the conclusion of the show. 10 Stewards Stewards shall be appointed by the Show Committee.

A Steward should clearly understand he or she has no connection with Show Committee decisions or the judging of the Show.

The Steward should point out in a diplomatic manner any instance where the rules are not enforced.

The Steward should not dictate to the Judges or the Show Committee, but should immediately report to the appropriate officials any violations of the rules which might invalidate a class.

The Steward should be available to Judges, exhibitors, and the Show Committee at all times to clarify the application of the State 4-H Horse Show Rules, and to investigate any situation in which the rules are not upheld.

The other duties of the Steward shall be, but shall not be limited to, the following: 1.

To verify the enforcement of the Show rules. 2.

To protect the interest of exhibitors, Judges, and Show Committee. 3.

To report to the Show Committee any misrepresentation or substitution of entry without waiting for a protest. 4.

To supervise and record “time outs.” 5.

To report to the Show Committee Chairman any offense or violation of the rules committed by an exhibitor, judge, or official.

Judges 1.

Good judging depends upon the correct observation of horses and/or riders and the measuring of them against a standard commonly accepted as the ideal, according to the conditions of the class being judged.

A judge serves three interests: his or her own conscience, the exhibitors, and the spectators.

The judge should make clear to the audience that it is the best horses or riders who win. 4-H is a learning experience, and the members should be able to follow the judging procedure. 2.

The Judge may excuse an exhibitor for the abuse of an animal in the show arena and/or evidence that an act of abuse has occurred.

The judge may excuse a horse at any time while in the arena for unsafe or inhumane conditions pertaining to the horse and/or rider. 3.

A judge must adjudicate each class in conformity with the rules and specifications of the class as they appear in this Rule Book.

A judge may choose not to place any exhibitor that does not fulfill the requirements of a class as specified in this rulebook. 4.

The judge may excuse any exhibitor due to concerns for the safety of any participant or horse in any class. 11 5.

The decision of each judge is final and represents a non-protestable expression of individual preference, unless a decision is alleged to be in violation of the rules. 6.

The Judge should approve Trail and Working Hunter and Equitation Over Fences courses prior to the Show Committee posting such courses. 7.

It is the Judge’s responsibility to provide Showmanship, Horsemanship, Saddle Seat Equitation and Equitation on the Flat patterns/tests to the show committee and determine the pattern to be used for Western Riding.

The judge should consult with the Show Committee to determine the appropriate degree of difficulty in these patterns/tests.

Protests A protest may be made by an exhibitor participating in the class, by his or her parents, the county educator, or a 4-H Leader or Volunteer for any violation of the rules governing a particular class.

All protests must be lodged verbally or in writing to the Show Committee prior to the announcement of the placing of that particular class.

Protests must be accompanied by $50.00 cash.

If the protest is upheld, the funds will be returned.

However, if the protest is denied, the funds will be deposited in the horse show account.

Height measurement protests must also be accompanied by $50.00 cash, see height measurement rule, Performance Rules, rule 17c.

The Show Committee or Show Chairperson shall determine decisions regarding protests prior to the announcement of the placing of the class.

The Judge may ask the Show Committee for clarification of the Steward’s interpretation of the rules as written.

The show committee’s decision regarding a protest shall be final and considered accepted by all exhibitors.

Video footage will not be reviewed as evidence in a protest situation.

Non protestable decisions include : The soundness of a horse when determined by the official veterinarian of the show or by the judge if a veterinarian is not available.

A judge’s decision shall represent his or her individual opinion.

An animal’s height is not protestable at a district or state show, providing the exhibitor has a valid PA 4-H Height Certificate. 12 Production Rules The production division is for horses 5 years of age and under.

In-hand classes are offered for horses 3 years of age and under and are judged on: 75% conformation, breed, type and condition of horse and 25% on handling ability of exhibitor (ability of exhibitor to safely control and properly present the horse to the judge).

Futurity classes are offered for 2, 3, 4 and 5 year old horses.

Western Pleasure futurity classes are judged according to rules for Western Pleasure.

English Pleasure futurity classes may include diverse breeds and/or types and are judged according to the rules for Saddle Type Pleasure and Hunter Under Saddle as appropriate.

Current PA 4-H Horse Production Project Guidelines will apply at all production shows.

Guidelines are available from county extension offices or the 4-H Horse Program website. 1. 4-H members must be 12 years of age or older or have passed handling skills of the Level 1 Horsemanship Skills Program with each production project animal to show at county, regional, or state 4-H production shows.

Youth under 12 years of age exhibiting in pleasure futurity classes must have passed the entire Level 1 Horsemanship Skills test in order to show.

Youth under 12 must retest the appropriate Level 1 Skills on an annual basis with each production project animal to be shown.

For 4-H members under 12 years of age, a copy of the Level 1 Horsemanship Skills Evaluation Sheet must be included with entry forms or submitted at the show for each animal.

The Evaluation Sheet must include signatures of 3 trained Horsemanship Skills examiners and indicate that the youth has passed all applicable horsemanship skills.

Youth under 12 years of age who have not passed Level 1 handling skills may be enrolled in the production project but will not be allowed to show until they are 12 years of age (4-H age as of January 1 of current year) or meet the horsemanship skills requirement. 2.

Record book must be up-to-date before a member will be eligible to compete at a regional production show.

A Grooming, Showmanship and Handling Skills score must be obtained prior to the state show.

All members to be eligible to compete at the regional and state production shows must have completed appropriate project requirements as determined by each county. 3.

A production project animal may also be used as the member’s performance project animal, with the following exceptions; 13 a.

No animals 2 years of age or younger will be allowed to compete in any riding or driving classes in the performance division.

B.

Animals one (1) year of age and older may be shown in Showmanship and Mini In-Hand Trail.

C.

No colts or stallions will be allowed to compete in any performance class. 4.

Project animals must be owned or leased by the 4-H member or a member of his or/her immediate family prior to June 1 to show that year.

The immediate family rule does not apply to animals that are the bona fide property of a 4-H club.

The County Extension Office will determine eligibility in such cases.

Leased horses will be eligible if the following items are adhered to: a.

Lessee must have a verbal or written lease.

If the lease is written, the standardized 4-H Horse Project Lease Agreement Form must be used, or must have prior approval by the 4-H insurance company before the lease is signed.

B.

Lease must be for the minimum of the project year (June 1 current year to day following the State 4-H Horse Show.) c.

The lease may be between the 4-H member and the owner or the parent or guardian of the 4-H member and owner.

D.

A copy of the lease, or notification of an oral lease must be provided to the County Extension Office no later than June 1 of the current year. 5.

Animals may be enrolled in the production project at any time during the calendar year.

No animals may be initially enrolled in the project after the year they are three years old (See rule 14 regarding age of horse) (broodmares excepted).

In the event that an enrolled animal is sold, its eligibility is transferred to the new 4-H member, provided the new member/owner meets all requirements to show that year. 6.

Project animals do not necessarily have to be shown each calendar year but must be enrolled by June 1 to complete project requirements for the current year. 7.

To be eligible for the current year’s 4-H Horse Production Shows, the 4-H member’s animal(s) must be enrolled and designated as the member’s project animal(s) in the 4-H horse production project by June 1 of the current year. 8.

Animals 3 years of age and older must be enrolled annually to maintain eligibility for showing. 9.

Foals of the current year must be born by May 1 and entered by the show entry deadline in order to show in 4-H shows.

Broodmares can be enrolled as a project animal, but may not be exhibited at regional 14 production shows.

Mares will not be permitted in the arena with their foals while the foal is being shown. 10.

In the event an enrolled animal becomes unsound or dies prior to the regional show, only animals enrolled in the production project by June 1 may be substituted.

Under no conditions may animals be substituted after the regional production show. 11.

Animals will be shown in hand with halter or bridle in the manner that is conventional for the respective breed or type. 12.

Production show exhibitors are permitted to show and dress according to respective breed association standards, or they may see the appropriate notation under western, hunter or saddle seat divisions, in performance rules.

However, coats will not be required for In-hand classes.

Protective headgear is required in all production classes.

Canvas shoes or sneakers are prohibited. 13.

Dress requirements for Draft Horse exhibitors: The handler and “trailer”, if used, must be neat and clean and quietly dressed.

Attire should be suitable for the show ring and the job at hand and fit properly without being too loose or too tight.

Girls may wear skirt or slacks.

T-shirts, halter tops and tank tops are prohibited.

Canvas shoes or sneakers are prohibited.

Vests, jackets, and ties are optional. 14.

The age of a horse is established on the basis of a calendar year starting January 1 of the year foaled.

The animal is a weanling during the calendar year in which it was foaled and a yearling during the first calendar year following its foaling date, regardless of the time of year foaled.

For example, a horse foaled anytime in 2012 is considered a yearling on January 1, 2013; two years old on January 1, 2014, three years old on January 1, 2015, and so on. 15.

No stallions or jacks older than weanlings will be allowed to be shown in production classes. 16.

Horses will be shown by breed or type, and according to age. 17.

A schedule of registered classes will be offered for horses that are registered in the breed associations listed.

Animals of different breeds will not be shown in the same registered class.

All unregistered horses or horses registered in associations not listed as follows will be shown by type as unregistered or grade animals. BREED Appaloosa Arabian Buckskin Haflinger Half Arabian ASSOCIATION Appaloosa Horse Club, Inc.

The Arabian Horse Association or Canadian Arabian Horse Registry International Buckskin Horse Assn.

Or American Buckskin Registry Assn.

American Haflinger Registry International Arabian Horse Assn. 15 Miniature Horse Morgan Paint Palomino Paso Fino Pinto POA Quarter Horse Saddlebred Shetland Pony Standardbred Tennessee Walking Thoroughbred Welsh Pony Half Welsh Warmblood Belgian Clydesdale Percheron Shire American Miniature Horse Assn.

Or American Miniature Horse Registry American Morgan Horse Assn.

Inc.

American Paint Horse Association Palomino Horse Breeders of America or Palomino Horse Association Inc.

Paso Fino Horse Assn.

Inc.

Pinto Horse Assn.

Of America Inc.

Pony of Americas Club Inc.

Am.

American Quarter Horse Assn.

American Saddlebred Horse Assn.

Or Canadian American Saddlebred Horse Registry American Shetland Pony Club U.S.

Trotting Assn.

Tennessee Walking Horse Breeders and Exhibitors Association The Jockey Club Welsh Pony and Cob Society of America or Welsh Section Canadian Pony Society Performance Horse Registry or Respective Warmblood Breed Registry Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America Clydesdale Breeders of the US Percheron Horse Assn.

Of America American Shire Horse Assn. 18.

An animal shown in one breed or type division cannot be shown in another division or type at future shows during that year, and animals registered in more than one association may be shown in only one breed/type class.

Double registered animals may be shown as the opposite breed in future years. 19.

Classes for Appaloosa, Paint, or other breeds with color classifications will not be divided into solid, non-characteristic, breeding stock, etc.

Categories. 20.

Type classes for horses and ponies include all grade and unregistered animals for which a specific breed class is not offered.

Classes will be offered for Draft type, Stock type, Saddle type, Hunter type horses and ponies, Long Ears (Donkey and Mule type over 14.2 and under 14.2) and Miniature Horse type.

Grade draft horses will be shown together.

Pony classes are for those animals expected to mature to a height of 14.2 hands and under.

Both grade and registered animals will be shown together in Long Ears classes. 21.

The following classes may be offered for each breed or type: REGISTERED AND UNREGISTERED ANIMALS 1.

Colts and geldings of this year 2.

Yearling Geldings 3. 2-year-old Geldings 4. 3-year-old Geldings 5.

Fillies of this year 6.

Yearling Fillies 7. 2-year-old Fillies 8. 3-year-old Fillies LONG EARS (Donkeys, Mules) 1.

Jacks and geldings of this year 2.

Yearling Geldings 3. 2-year-old Geldings 4. 3-year-old Geldings 5.

Jennet of this year 6.

Yearling Jennet 7. 2 -year-old Jennet 8. 3-year-old Jennet — Ride without stirrups for a brief period of time, no more than 1 minute.

Riders may be asked to disengage or engage stirrups at any gait. If appropriate for all riders in the class – change of diagonals down center of ring or on the rail Serpentine at a trot or easiest gait.

A series of left and right half-circles with correct diagonals (if appropriate) must be shown. Back for no more than eight steps. Figure-eight at a trot or easiest gait demonstrating change of diagonals, if appropriate. Circle at the canter on the correct lead. Serpentine at a canter on correct lead demonstrating a simple change of lead. Figure-eight at canter on a correct lead demonstrating simple change of lead. Change leads down center of ring or on the rail demonstrating simple change of lead.

The judge must specify the beginning lead and subsequent lead changes to be performed.

Classes 27 and 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure Classes Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non Trotting These classes will be judged on manners, consistency, way of going, performance, and soundness.

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds normally used for Saddle Seat Pleasure.

Saddle Seat Pleasure classes will be divided into trotting and non trotting breeds/types.

A horse or pony may be shown in only one Saddle Seat Pleasure class.

Horses and ponies will compete in the same class.

Junior and Senior riders will compete in the same classes.

Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting This pleasure class is designated for trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; American Saddlebreds, Arabians, Morgans, etc.

Horses to be shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring.

Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non-Trotting This class is designated for non-trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; Tennessee Walking Horses, racking horses, Paso Finos, etc.

Horses will be required to perform gaits appropriate to their respective breed/types.

Horses to be shown at a walk, easiest gait or breed appropriate gait, and canter both ways of the ring.

Horses and ponies will show at their breed standard equivalent of the trot, including, but not limited to; running walk, single foot, rack, quarto, etc., with none being more desirable than the other as long as it is being performed naturally and consistently. 54 Hunt Seat Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes; Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail, Hunter Under Saddle, Hunter Hack and Driving (Pleasure or Draft).

In addition, Exhibitors may show in one equitation class (Equitation on the Flat or Over Fences) and one Working Hunter Class (Low Working or Working Hunter).

Exhibitors showing Low Working Hunter may not show in Equitation Over Fences.

Clothing and equipment requirements: a.

Riding breeches, jodhpurs or skirt b.

Hunt boots or jodhpur boots c.

Shirt or ratcatcher shirt d.

Tie or choker e.

Riding coat f.

Hunt cap or protective headgear for Grooming and Showmanship classes; protective headgear required in all other classes.

Equipment: a.

Hunt or forward seat saddle.

B.

Snaffles, pelhams, kimberwickes and full bridles, all with cavesson nose bands, are recommended.

C.

Bits that are permitted by respective breed associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

A judge at his/her own discretion can penalize a horse with non-conventional types of bits, bridles or nosebands.

Drop nosebands, flash nosebands, bitless bridles, etc., are considered nonconventional.

D.

Standing martingales are optional in Working Hunter Classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Whips and crops are optional.

Regular hunting spurs without rowels are optional.

F.

In equitation classes, protective boots or conservative colored bandages are permitted.

In Low/Working Hunter and Hunter Hack classes in inclement weather, the Show Committee or Judge may permit the use of bell boots only.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

Prohibited Clothing and Equipment: a.

Slip on spurs not attached with a spur strap b.

Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages except as noted in item f above.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

C.

Draw reins d.

Martingales are prohibited, Exception: Standing martingales are permitted in Working Hunter classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Mechanical hackamores f.

Whips or bats exceeding 30 inches in length 55 Hunt Seat Equitation A rider may show in only one equitation class (see Performance Rule 16).

Only the rider is being judged.

Rider should have workmanlike appearance, seat and hands should be light and supple, conveying the impression of complete control should an emergency arise.

Hands – Hands should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles thirty degrees inside the vertical, hands slightly apart and making a straight line from horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow.

Light contact with horse’s mouth is required.

Basic Position – The eyes should be up and shoulders back.

Toes should be at an angle best suited to rider’s conformation: ankles flexed in, heels down, calf of leg in contact with horse and slightly behind girth.

Iron should be on the ball of the foot and must not be tied to the girth.

Position in Motion – At the walk, sitting trot and canter, body should be a couple of degrees in front of the vertical: posting trot, inclined forward; galloping and jumping, same inclination as posting trot.

Classes 29 & 30 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Class 29 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Junior Division Class 30 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Senior Division Exhibitors will show on the rail at a walk, trot and canter in both directions with the reverse executed away from the rail.

All riders will be required to perform an individual test or pattern that the judge feels will demonstrate the rider’s ability.

Tests or patterns must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

If markers are used in the tests or patterns, appropriate length of hunter stride should be taken in to account when determining space for the tests or patterns.

Tests will include one or more of the following skills:  halt 4-6 seconds  back  walk or extended walk in a straight line or circle  trot or extended trot in a straight line or circle  sitting trot, posting trot, and/or two-point position in a straight line or circle  figure 8 or serpentine at trot demonstrating change of diagonal  canter in a straight line or circle  ride without stirrups, riders must be allowed the option to cross stirrups  turn on the forehand 56  turn on the haunches no more than 180  figure 8 or at a canter, demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  serpentine at a canter on correct lead demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  change leads on a line, demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  counter canter  hand gallop Classes 31 & 32 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Class 31 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Junior Division Class 32 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Senior Division Participants in Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) must have a minimum score of 50 to be considered for advancement to the district show and a minimum score of 60 to be considered for advancement to the state show.

The quota system determining the number of participants from each district to advance to the state level will also apply.

In no case will more than the maximum quota be permitted to advance to the next level regardless of their score.

The class objective is to judge the rider’s ability over fences, not the horse’s ability.

Rider should have workmanlike appearance with light and supple seat and hands, conveying the impression of complete control in any situation.

Equitation will be judged on hands, seat, legs, use of aids and control.

Except for refusals, jumping faults of the horse are not to be considered unless they are the result of the rider’s ability.

Refer to, Courses and Fences (in the Working Hunter Section) for information on acceptable course and fence design.

Types of jumps shall be left to the discretion of the Show Committee.

Courses must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

Horses and ponies can be in the same class but will take jumps at different heights.

Jumps will be about 2 feet for ponies 12.2 hands and under; about 2 feet 3 inches for ponies over 12.2 hands and not exceeding 13.2 hands; about2 feet 6 inches for ponies over 13.2 hands and not exceeding 14.2 hands; and about 3 feet for horses over 14.2 hands.

All horses and ponies in a class must jump the same jumps.

When adjusting fence heights, the components of the fence must not be changed. 57 Each contestant may circle once if desired before approaching first jump.

Additional circles are considered a major fault.

He/she shall then proceed once or twice around the course (but not less than six jumps), keeping an even pace throughout.

The performance begins when the horse enters the ring or is given the signal to proceed after entering ring Three cumulative refusals, off course, or fall will eliminate a contender.

The scoring shall be on a basis of 0 – 100, with 70 denoting and average performance with approximate breakdown as follows: 90 – 100: 80 – 89: Excellent equitation, position, and presentation; meets all fences squarely and at proper distance Above average performer.

Meets all fences squarely and at proper distance, rider position correct, minor equitation faults, rider still maintains a quality ride Average to above average performer, but with minor faults.

Not a flowing course, some distances not accurate, rider position weak, but still effective.

Rider position less than average, some errors in the components of the course.

Rider position is ineffective, examples of errors in course may include; break in gait, extra stride in lines.

Rider position interferes with performance of horse, examples of errors in course may include refusal, rail down as a result of rider’s ability Rider position and course errors avoid elimination Elimination 70 – 79: 60 -69: 50 – 59: 40 -49: 10 – 39: 0 Elimination: Three refusals (ie, refusal, run-out, stop on course (unless for reset), extra circle) Off Course Jumping a fence before reset Bolting on the course Fall of horse or rider If the horse steps into an obvious wrong lead for one or two strides only before or on the courtesy circle, it is noted on the score sheet; this may be used as a tie breaker in the event of a ride of equal quality and score. 58 Classes 33, 34 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies Class 33 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies (13.0 hands and under) Class 34 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies (over 13.0 hands and not over 14.2 hands) Hunter Under Saddle Pony classes will be divided only by height and not by type.

Hunter ponies will be shown at a walk, trot, and canter, both ways of the ring.

The Judge may require a hand gallop in one direction (not more than eight ponies at one time).

Ponies should back easily and stand quietly.

Martingales prohibited.

To be judged on performance, manners, conformation, soundness, and suitability to purpose. Classes 35, 36, 37, 38 – Hunter Under Saddle Horses Two types of Hunter Under Saddle Horse classes are offered: Classic Type and Breed Type.

Exhibitors may show in only one type of class.

The exhibitor and their parent and/or coach should determine which class is best suited for their horse.

Classic Hunter Under Saddle Horses shown in these classes will generally be the type shown at USEF hunter and open hunter shows.

These may include, but are not limited to Thoroughbreds, Thoroughbred types, Warmbloods and Warmblood types.

Breed Type Hunter Under Saddle Horses shown in these classes will generally be the type shown at breed shows and open shows.

These will typically be of stock breed origin and usually include, but are not limited to Quarter Horses, Paints, Appaloosas and crosses of these breeds.

Exhibitors of breeds or types not specifically stated (ie Arabians, Morgans, etc.) may show in one of either type class and should choose the class most appropriate for their horse.

Judges should expect to see different types and breeds of horses.

The judge should evaluate way of going relative to the type and breed of animal.

The judge should consider industry standards for breeds/types being shown.

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    Horses-Store.com - This rule applies at all times during any 4-H horse event, activity or show