Vertical : He should not carry his head behind the vertical giving….

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Pacifier Holder Clip Horses-store.comVertical : He should not carry his head behind the vertical giving….

Stiff or artificial body position will be penalized.

The rider should sit in the center of the saddle with the legs hanging to form a straight line from the ear, through the shoulder and hip, to the ankle.

The heels should be lower than the toes with a slight bend at the knee.

The rider’s back should be flat, relaxed and supple.

During the rail work and pattern, the exhibitor should have strong, secure and proper position.

When showing horses 6 yrs of age and over only one hand shall be used for reining and the hand shall not be changed.

When riding horses five years and younger with a hackamore or snaffle bit, riding with two hands, with the reins bridged is permissible and correct.

When split reins are used, one finger between the reins is permitted, and the bight of reins should be carried on the same side as the reining hand.

If a romal is used, the rider’s hand shall be around the reins and no fingers between the reins are allowed.

The tail of the romal shall be in the hand opposite from the reining hand.

Reins are to be carried immediately above or slightly in front of the saddle horn.

Reins should be carried so as to have light contact with the horse’s mouth.

Excessively tight or loose reins will be penalized.

Wrists are to be kept straight and relaxed with thumb on top and fingers closed around the reins.

Some movement of the arm is permissible, but excessive pumping will be penalized.

Class Procedure All riders must enter the ring and then work individually, or each exhibitor may be worked from the gate individually.

When riders are worked individually from the gate, a working order is required.

Riders should be instructed to either leave the arena, fall into line, or fall into place on the rail after their work.

Following individual patterns, the entire class must work at all three gaits both directions of the arena with the reverse executed away from the rail.

The following maneuvers are acceptable in a pattern:  walk, jog, trot, extended trot, lope or extended lope in a straight line, curved line, serpentine, circle or figure 8, square, or combination of these gaits and maneuvers  stop  back in a straight or curved line  turn or pivot, including spins and rollbacks on the haunches and/or on the forehand  sidepass 35  simple change of lead  option of simple or flying change of lead  counter canter Judges may not ask exhibitors to mount or dismount.

Performance The exhibitor should perform the work accurately, precisely, smoothly, and with a reasonable amount of promptness.

Exhibitors that perform the pattern sluggishly and allow their horse to move without adequate impulsion, collection or cadence will be penalized.

The horse should perform all maneuvers in the pattern willingly, briskly and readily with minimal visible or audible cueing.

Severe disobedience will not result in a disqualification, but should be severely penalized, and the exhibitor should not place above an exhibitor that completes the pattern correctly.

Failure to follow the prescribed pattern, knocking over or working on the wrong side of the cones, excessive schooling or training, or willful abuse by the exhibitor is cause for disqualification.

Classes 10, 11, 12 and 13 – Western Pleasure Class 10 – Western Pleasure Ponies (13 hands and under) Class 11 – Western Pleasure Ponies (over 13 hands and not over 14.2 hands) Class 12 – Western Pleasure Horses, Junior Rider Class 13 – Western Pleasure Horses, Senior Rider In all pleasure classes, the judge should place the emphasis on manners, performance, conformation, and soundness; and on neatness and cleanliness of horse, tack, and rider.

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds normally used for pleasure.

Contestants will work both ways of the ring at a walk, jog, and a lope but shall not be asked to hand gallop or extend the lope.

Horses should be shown on a reasonably loose rein or light contact, without undue restraint.

Horses may be asked to back.

Horses to be shown with Western tack.

Martingales (tie-downs) and nosebands are not permitted.

Use of spurs is optional; however, the rowels must be blunt and turn freely.

A true pleasure horse is light mouthed and ridden with a reasonably loose (but not sloppy) rein.

It must be easy to handle, smooth-gaited, and not show undesirable mannerisms.

Class 14 – Western Riding The scoring system outlined below must be followed and minimum scores must be attained before a 4-H member can advance through the 36 qualifying system.

Participants in Western Riding must have a minimum score of 55 to be considered for advancement to the district show and a minimum score of 58 to be considered for advancement to the state show.

The quota system determining the number of participants from each district to advance to the state level will also apply.

In no case will more than the maximum quota be permitted to advance to the next level regardless of their score. (a) Western Riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the lope, response to the rider, manners, and disposition.

The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving. (b) Credit shall be given for and emphasis placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits (ie, starting and finishing pattern with the same cadence), and the horse’s ability to change leads precisely, easily, and simultaneously both hind and front at the center point between markers.

In order to have balance, with quality lead changes, the horse’s head and neck should be in a relaxed, natural position, with his poll level with or slightly above the level of the withers.

He should not carry his head behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.

The horse should have a relaxed head carriage showing response to the rider’s hands, with a moderate flexion at the poll.

Horses may be ridden with light contact or on a reasonably loose rein.

The horse should cross the log both at the jog and the lope without breaking gait or radically changing stride. (c) The judge and show committee will select one of the two patterns to be performed.

The judge is responsible for the pattern being correctly set. (d) On the pattern: (1)The small circles represent pylon markers which are recommended.

These should be separated by a uniform measured distance of not less than 30 feet (9 meters) nor more than 50 feet (15 meters) on the sides with 5 markers (see diagram).

In pattern one, the three markers on the opposite side should be set adjacent to the appropriate markers.

It is recommended that markers be set a minimum of 15 feet (4 1/2 meters) from the fence and with 50 to 80 foot (15 to 24 meters) width in the pattern, as the arena permits. (2) A solid log or pole should be used and be a minimum of 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length. (3) The long serpentine line indicates the direction of travel and gaits at which the horse is to move.

The shaded area represents the lead changing 37 area between the markers.

The dotted line (…) indicates walk, the dash line (- – -) jog, and the solid line ( – ) lope. (e) Scoring will be on a basis of 0-100 with 70 denoting an average performance.

Scoring guidelines to be considered: points will be added or subtracted from the maneuvers on the following basis, ranging from plus 1.5 to minus 1.5: -1.5 extremely poor, -1 very poor, – .5 poor, 0 average, +.5 good, +1 very good, +1.5 excellent.

Maneuver scores are to be determined independently of penalty points. (f) A contestant shall be penalized each time the following occur: Five (5) points (1) Out of lead beyond the next designated change area (note: failures to change, including crosscantering.

Two consecutive failures to change would result in two five (5) point penalties). (2) blatant disobedience including kicking out, biting, bucking, and rearing (3) Holding saddle with either hand Three (3) points (1) not performing the specific gait (jog or lope) or not stopping when called for in the pattern, within 10 feet (3 meters) of the designated area (2) simple change of leads (3) out of lead at or before the marker prior to the designated change area or out of lead at or after the marker after the designated change area (4) additional lead changes anywhere in pattern (except when correcting an extra change or incorrect lead) (5) in pattern one failure to start the lope within 30 feet (9 meters) after crossing the log at the jog (6) break of gait at walk or jog for more than two strides (7) break of gait at the lope One (1) point (1) hitting or rolling log (2) out of lead more than one stride either side of the center point and between the markers (3) splitting the log (log between the two front or two hind feet) at the lope (4) break of gait at the walk or jog up to two (2) strides 38 One-half (1/2) point (1) tick or light touch of log (2) hind legs skipping or coming together during lead change (3) non-simultaneous lead change (Front to hind or hind to front) Disqualified – 0 score (1) illegal equipment (2) willful abuse (3) off course (4) knocking over markers (5) completely missing log (6) major refusal – stop and back more than 2 strides or 4 steps with front legs (7) major disobedience or schooling (8) failure to start lope prior to end cone in patterns #1 and #2 (1st cone after log in pattern #2) (9) four or more simple lead changes and/or failures to change leads (10) overturn of more than 1/4 turn Credits (1) changes of leads, hind and front simultaneously (2) change of lead near the center point of the lead change area (3) accurate and smooth pattern (4) even pace throughout (5) easy to guide and control with rein and leg (6) manners and disposition (7) conformation and fitness (i) The following characteristics are considered faults and should be judged accordingly in maneuver scores (1) opening mouth excessively (2) anticipating signals (3) stumbling (4) head carried too high (5) head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers) (6) over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical (7) excessive nosing out 39 Location Penalties for Designated Change 3 POINT PENALTY 5 POINT PENALTY 1 POINT PENALTY DESIGNATED CHANGE NO LOCATION PENALTY ONE (1) STRIDE EITHER SIDE OF CENTER 1 POINT PENALTY 3 POINT PENALTY LEAD CHANGE AREA — Address the reins only in the lineup. In the lineup, disengage and engage feet from stirrups. Circle at a trot or easiest gait. 53 Ride without stirrups for a brief period of time, no more than 1 minute.

Riders may be asked to disengage or engage stirrups at any gait. If appropriate for all riders in the class – change of diagonals down center of ring or on the rail Serpentine at a trot or easiest gait.

A series of left and right half-circles with correct diagonals (if appropriate) must be shown. Back for no more than eight steps. Figure-eight at a trot or easiest gait demonstrating change of diagonals, if appropriate. Circle at the canter on the correct lead. Serpentine at a canter on correct lead demonstrating a simple change of lead. Figure-eight at canter on a correct lead demonstrating simple change of lead. Change leads down center of ring or on the rail demonstrating simple change of lead.

The judge must specify the beginning lead and subsequent lead changes to be performed.

Classes 27 and 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure Classes Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non Trotting These classes will be judged on manners, consistency, way of going, performance, and soundness.

Open to horses or ponies of any breed or combination of breeds normally used for Saddle Seat Pleasure.

Saddle Seat Pleasure classes will be divided into trotting and non trotting breeds/types.

A horse or pony may be shown in only one Saddle Seat Pleasure class.

Horses and ponies will compete in the same class.

Junior and Senior riders will compete in the same classes.

Class 27 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Trotting This pleasure class is designated for trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; American Saddlebreds, Arabians, Morgans, etc.

Horses to be shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring.

Class 28 – Saddle Seat Pleasure, Non-Trotting This class is designated for non-trotting horses and ponies, including but not limited to; Tennessee Walking Horses, racking horses, Paso Finos, etc.

Horses will be required to perform gaits appropriate to their respective breed/types.

Horses to be shown at a walk, easiest gait or breed appropriate gait, and canter both ways of the ring.

Horses and ponies will show at their breed standard equivalent of the trot, including, but not limited to; running walk, single foot, rack, quarto, etc., with none being more desirable than the other as long as it is being performed naturally and consistently. 54 Hunt Seat Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes; Grooming and Showmanship, Open Trail, Hunter Under Saddle, Hunter Hack and Driving (Pleasure or Draft).

In addition, Exhibitors may show in one equitation class (Equitation on the Flat or Over Fences) and one Working Hunter Class (Low Working or Working Hunter).

Exhibitors showing Low Working Hunter may not show in Equitation Over Fences.

Clothing and equipment requirements: a.

Riding breeches, jodhpurs or skirt b.

Hunt boots or jodhpur boots c.

Shirt or ratcatcher shirt d.

Tie or choker e.

Riding coat f.

Hunt cap or protective headgear for Grooming and Showmanship classes; protective headgear required in all other classes.

Equipment: a.

Hunt or forward seat saddle.

B.

Snaffles, pelhams, kimberwickes and full bridles, all with cavesson nose bands, are recommended.

C.

Bits that are permitted by respective breed associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

A judge at his/her own discretion can penalize a horse with non-conventional types of bits, bridles or nosebands.

Drop nosebands, flash nosebands, bitless bridles, etc., are considered nonconventional.

D.

Standing martingales are optional in Working Hunter Classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Whips and crops are optional.

Regular hunting spurs without rowels are optional.

F.

In equitation classes, protective boots or conservative colored bandages are permitted.

In Low/Working Hunter and Hunter Hack classes in inclement weather, the Show Committee or Judge may permit the use of bell boots only.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

Prohibited Clothing and Equipment: a.

Slip on spurs not attached with a spur strap b.

Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages except as noted in item f above.

Boots may not be of the slip on type that covers the sole of the hoof.

C.

Draw reins d.

Martingales are prohibited, Exception: Standing martingales are permitted in Working Hunter classes and Equitation Over Fences.

E.

Mechanical hackamores f.

Whips or bats exceeding 30 inches in length 55 Hunt Seat Equitation A rider may show in only one equitation class (see Performance Rule 16).

Only the rider is being judged.

Rider should have workmanlike appearance, seat and hands should be light and supple, conveying the impression of complete control should an emergency arise.

Hands – Hands should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles thirty degrees inside the vertical, hands slightly apart and making a straight line from horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow.

Light contact with horse’s mouth is required.

Basic Position – The eyes should be up and shoulders back.

Toes should be at an angle best suited to rider’s conformation: ankles flexed in, heels down, calf of leg in contact with horse and slightly behind girth.

Iron should be on the ball of the foot and must not be tied to the girth.

Position in Motion – At the walk, sitting trot and canter, body should be a couple of degrees in front of the vertical: posting trot, inclined forward; galloping and jumping, same inclination as posting trot.

Classes 29 & 30 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Class 29 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Junior Division Class 30 – Hunt Seat Equitation (on the flat) Senior Division Exhibitors will show on the rail at a walk, trot and canter in both directions with the reverse executed away from the rail.

All riders will be required to perform an individual test or pattern that the judge feels will demonstrate the rider’s ability.

Tests or patterns must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

If markers are used in the tests or patterns, appropriate length of hunter stride should be taken in to account when determining space for the tests or patterns.

Tests will include one or more of the following skills:  halt 4-6 seconds  back  walk or extended walk in a straight line or circle  trot or extended trot in a straight line or circle  sitting trot, posting trot, and/or two-point position in a straight line or circle  figure 8 or serpentine at trot demonstrating change of diagonal  canter in a straight line or circle  ride without stirrups, riders must be allowed the option to cross stirrups  turn on the forehand 56  turn on the haunches no more than 180  figure 8 or at a canter, demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  serpentine at a canter on correct lead demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  change leads on a line, demonstrating a simple or flying change of lead  counter canter  hand gallop Classes 31 & 32 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Class 31 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Junior Division Class 32 – Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) Senior Division Participants in Hunt Seat Equitation (over fences) must have a minimum score of 50 to be considered for advancement to the district show and a minimum score of 60 to be considered for advancement to the state show.

The quota system determining the number of participants from each district to advance to the state level will also apply.

In no case will more than the maximum quota be permitted to advance to the next level regardless of their score.

The class objective is to judge the rider’s ability over fences, not the horse’s ability.

Rider should have workmanlike appearance with light and supple seat and hands, conveying the impression of complete control in any situation.

Equitation will be judged on hands, seat, legs, use of aids and control.

Except for refusals, jumping faults of the horse are not to be considered unless they are the result of the rider’s ability.

Refer to, Courses and Fences (in the Working Hunter Section) for information on acceptable course and fence design.

Types of jumps shall be left to the discretion of the Show Committee.

Courses must be posted at least one hour prior to the start of the class.

Horses and ponies can be in the same class but will take jumps at different heights.

Jumps will be about 2 feet for ponies 12.2 hands and under; about 2 feet 3 inches for ponies over 12.2 hands and not exceeding 13.2 hands; about2 feet 6 inches for ponies over 13.2 hands and not exceeding 14.2 hands; and about 3 feet for horses over 14.2 hands.

All horses and ponies in a class must jump the same jumps.

When adjusting fence heights, the components of the fence must not be changed. 57 Each contestant may circle once if desired before approaching first jump.

Additional circles are considered a major fault.

He/she shall then proceed once or twice around the course (but not less than six jumps), keeping an even pace throughout.

The performance begins when the horse enters the ring or is given the signal to proceed after entering ring Three cumulative refusals, off course, or fall will eliminate a contender.

The scoring shall be on a basis of 0 – 100, with 70 denoting and average performance with approximate breakdown as follows: 90 – 100: 80 – 89: Excellent equitation, position, and presentation; meets all fences squarely and at proper distance Above average performer.

Meets all fences squarely and at proper distance, rider position correct, minor equitation faults, rider still maintains a quality ride Average to above average performer, but with minor faults.

Not a flowing course, some distances not accurate, rider position weak, but still effective.

Rider position less than average, some errors in the components of the course.

Rider position is ineffective, examples of errors in course may include; break in gait, extra stride in lines.

Rider position interferes with performance of horse, examples of errors in course may include refusal, rail down as a result of rider’s ability Rider position and course errors avoid elimination Elimination 70 – 79: 60 -69: 50 – 59: 40 -49: 10 – 39: 0 Elimination: Three refusals (ie, refusal, run-out, stop on course (unless for reset), extra circle) Off Course Jumping a fence before reset Bolting on the course Fall of horse or rider If the horse steps into an obvious wrong lead for one or two strides only before or on the courtesy circle, it is noted on the score sheet; this may be used as a tie breaker in the event of a ride of equal quality and score. 58 Classes 33, 34 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies Class 33 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies (13.0 hands and under) Class 34 – Hunter Under Saddle Ponies (over 13.0 hands and not over 14.2 hands) Hunter Under Saddle Pony classes will be divided only by height and not by type.

Hunter ponies will be shown at a walk, trot, and canter, both ways of the ring.

The Judge may require a hand gallop in one direction (not more than eight ponies at one time).

Ponies should back easily and stand quietly.

Martingales prohibited.

To be judged on performance, manners, conformation, soundness, and suitability to purpose. Classes 35, 36, 37, 38 – Hunter Under Saddle Horses Two types of Hunter Under Saddle Horse classes are offered: Classic Type and Breed Type.

Exhibitors may show in only one type of class.

The exhibitor and their parent and/or coach should determine which class is best suited for their horse.

Classic Hunter Under Saddle Horses shown in these classes will generally be the type shown at USEF hunter and open hunter shows.

These may include, but are not limited to Thoroughbreds, Thoroughbred types, Warmbloods and Warmblood types.

Breed Type Hunter Under Saddle Horses shown in these classes will generally be the type shown at breed shows and open shows.

These will typically be of stock breed origin and usually include, but are not limited to Quarter Horses, Paints, Appaloosas and crosses of these breeds.

Exhibitors of breeds or types not specifically stated (ie Arabians, Morgans, etc.) may show in one of either type class and should choose the class most appropriate for their horse.

Judges should expect to see different types and breeds of horses.

The judge should evaluate way of going relative to the type and breed of animal.

The judge should consider industry standards for breeds/types being shown. Class 35 – Classic Hunter Under Saddle Horses Junior Rider Class 36 – Classic Hunter Under Saddle Horses Senior Rider Horses are to be shown at a walk, trot, and canter both ways of the ring.

The judge may require a hand 59 gallop in one direction, not more than 8 horses at one time.

Horses should back easily and stand quietly.

Light contact with the horse’s mouth is required.

To be judged on performance, manners, soundness, and suitability to purpose.

Regardless of breed, horses should be obedient, alert, responsive, and move in a balanced frame, with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, freeflowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence.

The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gait is a major consideration.

Class 37 – Breed Type Hunter Under Saddle Horses Junior Rider Class 38 – Breed Type Hunter Under Saddle Horses Senior Rider Horses to be judged on performance, manners, soundness and suitability to purpose.

Horses should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence.

The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gait is a major consideration.

The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow the proper impulsion behind.

The head position should be slightly in front or on the vertical.

Light contact with the horse’s mouth is required.

Horses will be shown at a walk, trot and canter, both ways of the ring.

Horses should back easily and stand quietly.

The judge may require a hand gallop in one direction, not more than 8 horses at one time.

Classes 39 and 40 – Low Working Hunter Classes 41 and 42 – Working Hunter Class 39 – Low Working Hunter Ponies Class 40 – Low Working Hunter Horses Class 41 – Working Hunter Ponies Class 42 – Working Hunter Horses Participants in Working Hunter and Low Working Hunter must have a minimum score of 50 to be considered for advancement to the district show and a minimum score of 60 to be considered for advancement to the state show.

The quota system determining the number of participants from each district to advance to the state level will also apply.

In no case will more than the maximum quota be permitted to advance to the next level regardless of their score. 60 Courses and Fences For assistance in designing jumps and courses, refer to the Sample Jumps and Course Design for Over Fences Classes available from county extension offices or the PA 4-H horse website.

Course diagrams must be posted at least one hour before the scheduled time of the class.

The diagram must show the obstacles, which must be taken in the order and direction indicated by their numbers, but apart from this, the rider is not bound to follow a compulsory track.

A hunter course shall consist of at least six fences which management deems a fair test of a hunter.

Fences should simulate obstacles found in the hunting field, such as natural post and rail, brush, stone walls, white board fence or gate, natural gates, and oxers.

Oxers are not to be square; a 6″ difference is recommended for the back element with a minimum of 3″.

In the Low Working Hunter Classes (horses and ponies) there will be no oxers.

A ground line is recommended for all fences.

There must be at least one change of direction in the course.

A rail must be the uppermost factor of an element to allow a horse to safely brush a fence.

When building jumps, standards and wings should be built to allow for 3″ adjustment capability.

When an oxer or spread jump is included on the course, the back rail must be supported by an FEI approved safety mechanism (refer to the Sample Jumps and Course Design for Over Fences Classes for ordering the safety jump cups).

When setting an oxer, the width should never exceed the height.

Fences that are not be used include a chicken coop that is hinged at the top and not secured at the bottom.

This type of coop is considered a safety hazard.

Jumps such as triple bars, hogbacks, targets and any spread over 4′ are prohibited.

Each course should have at least three different types of fences.

All fences should have rails as the top element.

All fences should have adequate wings.

Rails, gates and fillers should be at least 10 ft.

In length.

It is recommended that the wings be at least 30 inches wide and 12 inches higher than the obstacle.

The use of a ground line is recommended for all obstacles, but should not be a jump rail that can roll if a horse steps on it.

When an obstacle is moved or altered, it must be reset to its original position.

When designing courses, whether it is an Equitation Class, Low Working Hunter or Working Hunter Class, generally, the lines for a 2’6” or 3′ course are based on a 12′ stride, with 6’ for take-off and 6’ for landing. (example – a 4 61 stride is a sixty foot line).

However, when in a small ring or indoor, many times an 11′ stride can be used.

In a small or indoor ring, horses don’t land as far into a line, and thus a line based in an 11’ stride will allow the riders and horses to ride a more balanced course.

It is suggested to test equally, both leads should be demonstrated over the same number of fences.

However, every course must require at least one lead change.

It is best to start a course with a single fence and not a line, as this provides an advantage to the horse and rider.

Using a single fence headed toward the ingate gives the horse confidence, and is a great way to start a course.

Any line must start with a vertical fence and may have either an oxer or a vertical to finish (Oxers cannot be used in Low Working Hunter Classes).

If the distance between the jumps is 90 feet or less from base to base the distance should be included in posted course diagrams.

Management should make every attempt to post distances with the posted courses.

This will help educate 4-H members to properly ride courses.

Management should also provide a practice jump or two in a safe area so exhibitors may school horses.

When equipment availability and time allow, exhibitors may be permitted to school over the actual course or the jumps being used for the course.

Exhibitors may also be given time to “walk” a course, if time permits.

Judging All horses and ponies must be serviceably sound.

All horses being considered for an award must be jogged for soundness with rider dismounted.

Horses that are not serviceably sound are ineligible for an award.

The competition begins when the horse or pony enters the ring and ends when he leaves the ring.

In the event of elimination, the horse must exit the ring immediately.

To be judged on manners, way of going, and style of jumping.

Horses shall be credited with maintaining an even hunting pace that covers the course with free flowing strides.

Preference will be given to horses with correct jumping style that meets fences squarely, jumping the center of the fence.

Judges shall penalize unsafe jumping and bad form over fences, whether touched or untouched.

Incorrect leads around the ends of the course or cross-cantering shall be penalized.

Any error which endangers the horse and/or rider, particularly refusals or knockdowns, shall be heavily penalized. 62 In cases of broken equipment or loss of shoe, the rider may either continue without penalty, or stop and correct the difficulty in which case he or she will be penalized accordingly (See major faults).

Circling once upon entering the ring and once upon leaving is permissible.

Additional circles are considered a major fault and scored as a refusal.

The scoring shall be on a basis of 0 – 100, with 70 denoting and average performance with approximate breakdown as follows: 90 – 100: An excellent performer that jumps the entire course in excellent form with cadence, balance and style 80 – 89: An above average performer that jumps all fences in excellent form, but may commit one or two minor faults 70 – 79: An average, fair performer that makes no major faults, but lacks the style, cadence and good balance of the scopier horses 60 – 69: An average or fair performer that has one or two poor fences but no major faults or disobediences 50 – 59: A horse that commits one major fault, such as trot, cross canter or drops a leg 30 – 49: A horse that commits two or more major faults, including knockdowns and refusals, or jumps in a manner that otherwise endangers the horse and/or rider 10 – 29: A horse that avoids elimination but jumps and performs in such an unsafe and dangerous manner as to preclude a higher score 0 Elimination FAULTS: Minor or Major Faults The following faults are scored according to the judge’s opinion, and depending on severity, may be considered minor or major faults: Showing an obstacle to a horse Missing a lead change Kicking out Spooking Jumping out of form Jumping into corners of obstacles Not jumping the center of fence Minor changes in pace Unhappy expression (pinning ears) Excessive use of crop 63 Major Faults: Knock down of any part of an obstacle Refusals Trotting while on course when not specified Bucking Stopping for loss of shoe or broken equipment Circling while on course Dangerous jumping Severe changes of pace Incorrect pace (over or under) Cross Cantering Missing a lead change Leaving a stride out of a line The following may or may not be considered as faults, depending on their severity and frequency: Light rubs Swapping leads in a line Late lead changes Excessive show of animation Adding a stride in a line Elimination: Three refusals (ie, refusal, run-out, stop on course (unless for reset) extra circle) Off course (ie, jumping an extra fence) Jumping a fence before it is reset Bolting from the ring Fall of horse or rider Tack – Standing martingales are permitted.

Boots and bandages of any description are prohibited.

In case of inclement weather the show committee or judge may permit the use of bell boots only.

Class 39 – Low Working Hunter Ponies (14.2 hands and under) All ponies will be shown in the same class, but will take jumps of different heights.

Jumps will be about 2’ for ponies 13.2 hands and under; and about 2’ 3” for ponies over 13.2 hands.

There will be no oxers.

Exhibitors showing in either Hunt Seat Equitation Over Fences or Working Hunter are not eligible to ride in the Low Working Hunter Ponies class Class 40 – Low Working Hunter Horses Jumps to be about 2’ 6” inches.

There will be no oxers.

Exhibitors showing in either Hunt Seat Equitation Over Fences or Working Hunter are not eligible to ride in the Low Working Hunter class.

Class 41 – Working Hunter Ponies (14.2 hands and under) Large and small ponies will be shown in the same class, but will take jumps of different heights.

Jumps will be about 2’ for ponies 12.2 hands and under; about 2’ 3” for ponies over 12.2 hands and not 64 exceeding 13.2 hands; and about 2’ 6” for ponies over 13.2 hands.

Class 42 – Working Hunter Horses Jumps to be about 3’.

Classes 43 and 44 – Hunter Hack Class 43 – Hunter Hack Ponies (14.2 hands and under) Class 44 – Hunter Hack Horses The hunter hack horse should move as a hunter under saddle horse, and the majority of judging emphasis will be placed on the flat work.

The hack horse should be quiet, move at a good hunting pace, possess good manners and way of going, and be capable of jumping a few fences in a good, safe style.

Judging begins with the exhibitors performing on the flat.

Exhibitors must perform a walk, trot, and canter both directions of the arena.

Horses will be required to hand gallop one direction of the arena or a hand gallop may be performed individually following completion of the last fence.

At the discretion of the judge, horses may be asked to halt, stand quietly and back following the individual’s completion of fences.

No more than 8 horses will be allowed to hand gallop at the same time.

All exhibitors will then be asked to jump two fences.

Fence height will be about 2’ for ponies 13.2 hands and under and 2’ 3” for ponies taller than 13.2 hands.

Fences for all horses will be about 2’ 6” The fences are commonly set in a straight line in the center of the arena, but may be set anywhere in the arena that may be safely jumped.

The jumps used are usually of a rather simple vertical post and rail type, and the use of a ground line is recommended.

If the jumps are set in a line, they are recommended to be set in 12 foot increments with a minimum of 60’.

If ring conditions do not permit, a 48’ line may be used.

Faults over fences are judged as in the Working Hunter and Low Working Hunter classes.

The majority of the emphasis in the judging is placed on the horse or pony’s flat work and then the style and safety with which they jump.

Refusal by the horse to jump is not cause for disqualification but will be scored accordingly and should significantly affect the placing.

One courtesy circle prior to the first fence is permitted.

Additional circles are considered a major fault.

Martingales prohibited.

Boots and bandages of any description are prohibited.

In case of inclement weather, the show committee or judge may permit the use of bell boots only. 65 Driving Division The primary performance horse may compete in this division, the open division and one of the following: Western, Saddle Seat, Hunt Seat and Contest.

Please see the respective divisions for a list of classes.

If a member has a secondary performance animal in the driving division this animal is eligible to participate in driving only.

General Specifications: Judges should expect to see different styles and types of horses and movement, styles of driving, etc.

In the driving classes.

The judge should evaluate way of going relative to the style and type of animal, ie: pleasure, park (saddle), draft type, etc.

The judge should consider desired standards for breed types being shown.

The term “Whip” is a traditional, but sometimes confusing euphemism.

The person controlling the lines and whip shall be referred herein as driver.

The only person to handle the lines and whip is the driver.

Assistance from attendant or any other person will be penalized.

The driver shall sit on the right hand side (offside) of the vehicle.

Either one or two handed method of driving is acceptable.common to both methods, the elbows and arms should be close to the body with an allowing, but steady hand enabling a consistent “feel” with the horse’s mouth.competitors must use an appropriate two-wheeled vehicle, stable and in good repair.

The vehicle must have a floor or basket, and must seat at least two people (the driver and the attendant).

Jog carts that meet these criteria are acceptable (the term “jog cart” can be used interchangeably with “show cart”).

A jog cart is defined as a wooden or metal-framed vehicle with wire wheels and pneumatic tires or wooden wheels.

Wheel size for jog carts must not exceed 26” in diameter.

Wheel size must be appropriate for the size of the animal and cart.

It is the responsibility of each competitor to ensure that harness and vehicle are in good repair and structurally sound.

It is the responsibility of each competitor to ensure that the harness is correctly fitted and adjusted to the horse and vehicle.

The turnout should be clean and fit properly.

A full collar harness may be used except with miniature horses.

A breast plate is suitable with lightweight vehicles and must be used with miniature horses.

Blinders are strongly recommended on all bridles.

The term blinkers or winkers can be used interchangeably with blinders. 66 Horses must be serviceably sound and must not show evidence of lameness, broken wind, or impairment of vision in both eyes.

It is the responsibility of each competitor to ensure that his horse is physically fit to fulfill the tasks required of it.

If shod, horses and ponies should be suitably shod for pleasure driving.

In Draft Horse Driving Classes, scotch shoes will not be penalized.

Braiding of the mane is optional.

Any mane, tail, or fetlock trimming may conform to breed standards.

The application of artificial hair in mane or tail is discouraged.

A tail set or the use of ginger to induce a high tail carriage is prohibited.

Gaits – Gaits and manners should be suitable for a youth to drive.

The following descriptions constitute the approved standard for performance of each of the required gaits in pleasure driving.

Walk – A free, regular and unconstrained walk of moderate extension is desired.

The horses and ponies should walk energetically, but calmly, with an even and determined pace.

Working Trot – The horse or pony should go forward freely and straight, engaging the hind legs with good hock action, on a taut but light rein, the position being balanced and unconstrained.

The steps should be as even as possible.

The hind feet should touch the ground in the footprints of the fore feet.

The degree of energy and impulsion displayed at the working trot denotes clearly the degree of suppleness and balance of the animal.

Collected or Slow Trot – Horses or ponies should demonstrate a slower pace than the working or strong trot.

The neck is raised enabling the shoulders to move with more ease, the hocks being well engaged.

Impulsion is maintained notwithstanding the slower movement.

The steps are shorter and lighter and more mobile.

Strong Trot – Horses should demonstrate a clear but not excessive increase in pace and lengthening of stride while remaining well balanced and showing appropriate lateral flexion on turns; light contact to be maintained.

Excessive speed will be penalized.

The term used for calling this gait is strong trot.

Halt – Horses or ponies and vehicle should be brought to a complete square stop without abruptness or veering.

At the halt, horses should stand attentively, motionless and straight, with the weight evenly distributed over the legs, and be ready to move off at the slightest command from the driver.

Back – This is a backward movement in which the legs are raised and set down simultaneously in diagonal pairs, with the hind legs remaining well in line.

The “Back” maneuver is to be performed in two 67 parts: (1) Back at least four steps, unhurried, with head flexed and straight, pushing back evenly in a straight line using light contact and quiet aids. (2) Move forward willingly to former position using the same quiet aids.

Judges shall not call for Halt and/or Back while the horses or ponies are on the rail.

Reverse Direction – It is suggested that the horse be turned toward the center of the ring, cross diagonally to the other side of the ring, and proceed in the opposite direction at the ringmaster’s instruction.

Safety: All persons involved in driving – attendants, officials, spectators, etc.

Should place safety foremost! 1.

Having one’s horse under control at all times is a mandatory safeguard for the driver, passengers, and everyone involved in the sport.

The Judge must eliminate from competition an unsafe vehicle, harness or an unruly horse. 2.

Under no condition must a bridle be removed from a horse while it is still put to a vehicle.

If this occurs, it is cause for an automatic elimination. 3.

Horses put to a vehicle must never be left unattended.

Failure to observe this rule shall cause immediate elimination. 4.

A driver should never allow passengers to enter a vehicle until he or she is seated with lines in hand, and must never dismount while passengers are on the vehicle. 5.

A knowledgeable adult attendant (must have reached their 19th birthday on or before Jan 1) is required to ride in the vehicle with the driver except in Miniature Horse Driving, Senior class.

The attendant shall render no other assistance except in an emergency. 6.

When on the line: a) The attendant may remain in the vehicle if another attendant enters the ring and heads the horse in line.

Attendants should use caution and walk quietly when approaching horses in the line.

OR b) The attendant must dismount and stand at the head of the horse until it is called to perform on the rail. 7.

Bridles should fit snugly to prevent catching on a vehicle or other pieces of harness.

Lines may be placed under the shoulder strap going to the breast plate. 8.

At the judge’s discretion, turnouts that pose a safety risk may be penalized or disqualified (including excessively noisy harness and carts in pleasure or miniature horse driving). 68 Classes 45 and 46 – Pleasure Driving Class 45 – Pleasure Pony Driving (14.2 h & under) Class 46 – Pleasure Horse Driving A pleasure driving class is one in which entries are judged primarily on the ability of the horse or pony to provide a pleasurable drive.

Pleasure Driving Classes will be judged 70% on manners, performance, and way of going, 20% on condition and fit of harness and vehicle, and 10% on neatness of attire.

Personal Attire and Appointments for driver and attendant: A.

Required 1.

Protective headgear is required for all drivers.

A hat (or protective headgear) is required for attendants. 2.

Riding boots or shoes with distinguishable heel; heel not to exceed two inches. 3.

Gloves 4.

Attire must be conservative according to the style of the present day.

Girls/women must wear a slack suit, dress suit, dress or skirt and blouse.

Boys/men must wear a coat or jacket with a shirt and tie and slacks or suit.

As an alternative, personal attire and appointments that are appropriate to the seat you ride will also be acceptable.

B.

Optional 1.

Lap robes or aprons optional for driver.

Lap robes or aprons for attendants are not recommended.

B.

Prohibited: 1.

Period costumes 2.

T-shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops or crew neck shirts, spaghetti straps, strapless outfits and blue jeans. 3.

Open-toed shoes, sandals, sneakers, clogs, shoes or boots with excessively high heels.

Tack and Equipment: A.

Required: 1.

Appropriate two-wheeled vehicle, stable and in good repair.

The vehicle must have a floor or basket, and must seat at least two people (the driver and the attendant).

Jog carts that meet these criteria are acceptable.

A jog cart is defined as a wooden or metal-framed vehicle with wire wheels and pneumatic tires or wooden wheels.

Wheel size for jog carts must not exceed 26” in diameter.

Wheel size must be appropriate for the size of the animal and cart. 2.

Standard bridle with or without blinders, however blinders are strongly recommended.

Cavesson or noseband that completely encircles the nose. 3.

Snaffle or driving bit (ie liverpool).

Bits may be covered with rubber or leather.

Bits permitted by respective breed/driving associations may be acceptable at the judge’s discretion.

For more information, refer to Performance Rule number 25, 69 and Guidelines for Bits in Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Shows (available from county extension offices or on the website). 4.

Driving harness.

Pleasure, light and fine harnesses are acceptable.

A full collar harness may be used; a breast plate is suitable with lightweight vehicles.

No scotch collar or housing is permitted. 5.

Breeching or thimbles required for all harnesses except when using fine harness for Jerald, Houghton, Serafin or similar show or pleasure jog carts.

Breeching or thimbles are recommended as a safety precaution with heavier vehicles, especially in uneven terrain. 6.

Whip – While remaining seated, the driver must be able to reach the shoulder on the near side of the horse with the lash of the whip.

Whip must be carried in hand at all times while driving.

Proper driving whips should be used.

Non conventional whips (ex.

Lunge whips or whips with lashes longer than those on conventional driving whips) should not be used and may be penalized.

B.

Optional: 1.

Running martingales are permitted with jog carts only; prohibited with any other vehicle.

Martingales are prohibited with leverage bits. 2.

Sidechecks are permitted with any vehicle; overchecks allowed only with jog carts or draft type harness.

C.

Prohibited: 1.

Racing sulkies and chariots, vehicles with footstirrups, vehicles suitable for only a single person and vehicles other than a two-wheeled vehicle. 2.

Scotch collar or housing 3.

Wrapping of trace lines around the vehicle shafts. 4.

Martingales are prohibited with leverage bits. 5.

Quarter boots 6.

Twisted wire or wire bits. 7.

Tail appliances other than a regular low crupper.

Class 45 – Pleasure Pony Driving Open to ponies 14.2 hands and under to be shown in pleasure, light, or fine harness.

It is recommended that all animals 14.2 hands and under be shown in this class.

To be shown both ways of the ring at a walk, collected trot and working trot.

The pony should stand quietly in the line-up and back readily.

To be hitched to a suitable two-wheeled vehicle.

Class 46 – Pleasure Horse Driving Open to pleasure type horses to be shown in pleasure, light or fine harness.

To be shown both ways of the ring at a walk, working trot, and strong trot.

The horse should 70 stand quietly in the line-up and back readily.

To be hitched to a suitable two-wheeled vehicle.

Class 47 – Draft Horse Driving Open to horses of draft type, with an expected mature weight of 1,500 pounds or more.

Horses should exhibit characteristics that are typical of draft horse breeds.

Judges at their discretion may penalize horses that do not exhibit acceptable draft type characteristics.

General Specifications: This class is to be shown both ways of the ring at the flat-footed walk and a trot that is suitable for a youth to drive.

No passing is allowed.

To reverse direction, it is suggested that the horse be turned toward the center of the ring, cross diagonally to the other side of the ring at a trot, and proceed in the opposite direction at the ringmaster’s direction.

Horses should stand quietly in the line-up and back readily.

The horse should be well mannered, easy to handle, responsive to the rein, and have even, ground covering gaits.

The horse should demonstrate a trot that shows both knee action and speed, while remaining a manageable animal for a youth to drive.

It should come down to a flat footed walk and stand quietly when stopped.

It should back willingly in a reasonably straight line without throwing its head.

This class will be judged 70% on manners, performance, and way of going, 20% on condition and fit of harness and vehicle, and 10% on neatness of attire.

Personal Attire and Appointments for Driver and Attendants: A.

Required: 1.

Protective headgear is required for all drivers.

A hat (or protective headgear) is optional for attendants. 2.

Riding boots or shoes with distinguishable heel; heel not to exceed two inches. 3.

Attire must be conservative according to the style of the present day.

Girls/women must wear a long dress, slack suit, dress suit, dress or skirt and blouse.

Boys/men must wear a coat or jacket with a shirt and tie and slacks or suit.

As an alternative, personal attire and appointments that are appropriate to the seat you ride will also be acceptable.

B.

Optional 1.

Lap robes or aprons optional for driver.

Lap robes or aprons for attendants are not recommended. 2.

Gloves C.

Prohibited: 1.

Period costumes 71 2.

T-shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops or crew neck shirts, spaghetti straps, strapless outfits and blue jeans. 3.

Open-toed shoes, sandals, sneakers, clogs, shoes or boots with excessively high heels.

Tack and Equipment: A.

Required: 1.

A suitable two-wheeled cart.

The vehicle must seat at least two people-the driver and attendant. 2.

Standard bridle with or without blinders, however blinders are strongly recommended. 3.

A straight or broken driving bit (ie liverpool or buxton).

Horse should have lines attached at the upper position on the bit when using a liverpool unless the driver cannot control the horse with the lines in this position.

Some judges may penalize an exhibitor for “curbing” his horse (positioning the lines further down the bit). 4.

A check rein is required (either a sidecheck, overcheck, or other working type check rein). 5.

Working type draft harness or show type harness with scotch top-collars, or draft type breast collar. 6.

Whip – Must be carried in hand at all times while driving.

While remaining seated, the driver must be able to reach the horse’s near flank with the lash of the whip.

Proper driving whips should be used.

Non conventional whips (ex.

Lunge whips or whips with lashes longer than those on conventional driving whips) should not be used and may be penalized.

B.

Optional: 1.

Decorative martingales are permitted but may not be attached to any part of the bit. 2.

Scotch type shoes.

C.

Prohibited Functional martingales are prohibited.

Miniature Horse Division The primary performance horse in this division may compete in the following classes only; Grooming and Showmanship, Miniature Horse Driving and Miniature Horse In Hand Trail.

If a member has a secondary performance animal in the Miniature Horse Division, this animal is eligible to participate in Miniature Horse In Hand Trail and Miniature Horse Driving only.

If a member exhibits both a primary and secondary performance animal, and both are minis, only one animal may shown in Miniature Horse In Hand Trail.

Class 48 – Miniature Horse Driving Junior Driver Class 49 – Miniature Horse Driving Senior Driver 72 — h.

Will have at least one aide (leader or side walker), that is familiar and has worked with the rider.

All aides must be 14 years of age or older.

The aide must assist the rider during mounting and dismounting.

No more than three aides may assist the rider in the class.

Aides may, if needed, communicate verbally with the rider, but any physical assistance in guiding or controlling the horse will be penalized, except in the case of emergency.

Special consideration will be given according to individual disabilities.

The degree of assistance provided by the leader/aide(s) will vary and is dependent on the ability of the rider.

I.

The size and temperament of the horse should be appropriate for the rider.

The size and ability of the side walker(s) and aide(s) should be appropriate to assist both the rider and horse.

J.

May not participate if they have any contraindications for participating in PA 4-H horse activities.

Parent or guardian is responsible for consulting their child’s health care professional(s) to determine if there are contraindications for participation in 4-H horse activities.

Additional information on contraindications for horse activities may be obtained from North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA) at www.narha.org or 1-800-369-RIDE or PA Council on Therapeutic Horsemanship (PACTH) at www.pacth.org Unauthorized assistance in the ring will be cause for the rider to be penalized.

Clothing and Equipment Requirements: a.

Riders may use English or Western tack and attire.

Clothing and equipment should be the same as English and Western divisions except as noted below; reasonable accommodations are acceptable.

Jeans or other long pants and hard soled shoes or boots are acceptable.

Attire will be neat.

Aides should be dressed in workmanlike attire; long pants or skirts, shirts with sleeves.

Appropriate footwear is noted below.

B.

Tank tops, halter tops, or soft soled shoes are not permitted for riders, horse leaders or side aides.

C.

Sneakers or other soft soled shoes may be worn only with written permission of a physician.

D.

Tack: Style of tack is optional.

Tack and equipment must be appropriate for the seat and class entered.

Mechanical hackamores are prohibited.

Halter and bridle, halter/bridle combination or bridle with snaffle bit and leading Y are required on all horses; (Exception: Non-mechanical hackamores or bosals are permitted on horses 5 years of age and under.).

A lead rope is required and may or may not 80 be attached to the horse, depending upon ability of the rider.

Attached lead ropes will not be penalized.

If a halter and bridle are used and the lead rope is attached, the lead rope must be attached to the halter; (Exception: A leading Y is permitted with a snaffle bit only.).

If a special type of bridle and/or bit is necessary due to an individual disability, a request for an accommodation should be made to the county extension educator.

Tack should be appropriate for the rider’s size and ability, and properly fitted to the horse and rider.

Riders should ride with feet in stirrups unless unable to do so due to their condition.

Adaptive equipment may be used, but in no way may the rider be attached to the horse or saddle.

Safety stirrups are advised.

Safety handles should be used on all English saddles.

E.

Spurs are discouraged and should only be used as adaptive equipment if appropriate for horse and rider.

Classes 51 and 52 – Obstacle Trail: Class 51 — Obstacle Trail, Maximum Assistance Class 52 — Obstacle Trail, Minimum Assistance Course designers must consider safety first at all times and are encouraged to design courses that will demonstrate proper horse handling techniques and horsemanship skills for riders with disabilities.

Refer to Guidelines for PA 4-H Obstacle Trail (Therapeutic Division) publication for suggested obstacle trail courses. (available in county extension offices or the PA 4-H Horse Program website) Courses must be posted at the beginning of the show and a copy should be made available to all entrants.

Handling or dragging of obstacles and mounting and dismounting WILL NOT be permitted in this class.

Management is encouraged to design elements that can be negotiated within 90 seconds.

Entries must be accompanied by at least one and not more than three aides. (If one aide is used he/she must remain in close proximity to the horse.) RIDER MUST GUIDE MOUNT THROUGH A PREPOSTED COURSE.

RIDERS MAY “WALK” (without their mounts) THE COURSE IF NEEDED, PRIOR TO START OF CLASS.

RIDERS WILL BE ASKED TO TROT OR JOG AT SOME PLACE IN THE PATTERN.

To be shown at a walk and sitting or posting trot or jog or alternate gait at the appropriate and indicated parts of the course.

Each time a rider receives unauthorized assistance from a side-walker, horse leader or spotter a penalty will be incurred. 81 Each obstacle not negotiated properly will result in penalty points.

Riders must execute the course as posted.

A minimum of five and maximum of seven obstacles will be used.

Course distances and obstacle recommendations: Refer to guidelines for Obstacle Trail for suggested course distances, recommendations and other course details. 1. 20 to 36 ft.

From starting/ending point to first/last obstacle 2.

Figure 8 with two 25 ft.

Diameter circles: MUST be done at the walk; must circle right then left.

Boundaries of the figure 8 (middle and outer edges) must be clearly defined with lines or cones. 3.

Figure 8 around two barrels – barrels must be 14 ft.

Apart.

Start to right of first barrel. 4.

Walk-overs – 4 natural or white rails (10 ft.

Long) placed at no less than 24 in.

Apart. 5.

Zig-Zag – Guide the horse through a “Z” of ground poles at the walk.

Rails must be at least 6′ ft.

Apart. 6.

Pass between two bales of hay, 6 ft.

Apart. 7.

At least 20 to 30 ft.

Between obstacles when jog/trot or alternate gait is used. 8.

Serpentine at least 5 cones or barrels (obstacles must be 10 ft.

Apart). 9. 360 Box – Turning the mount around in a prescribed circle or box (may be combined with stepping over poles if poles are used to make the box – this would count as two obstacles).

Box should be 10 ft.

Square. 10.

Halt at any prescribed location on the course.

Classes 53 and 54 – Walk Trot Equitation Class 53 – Walk Trot Equitation, Maximum Assistance Class 54 – Walk Trot Equitation, Minimum Assistance Equitation will be judged on the position of the rider, balance, use of the natural aids, and control of the mount.

Particular attention will be paid to the rider’s ability to safely and independently control the horse.

Leaders and sidewalkers are reminded that their position is one of safety – too much unnecessary assistance will be penalized by the judge.

Must be accompanied by one aide (may be accompanied by a leader and two sidewalkers).

Will be asked to perform at the walk: circle, halt, and reverse; and at the trot, sitting or posting (unless medically contraindicated). 82 GLOSSARY 1. 4-H Member Age Divisions: Junior Division – member who has not reached his 14th birthday by January 1st of the current year.

Senior Division – member 14 years old or over by January 1st of the current year.

Age on January 1st of current year determines Grooming and Showmanship class. 2.

Whenever this rulebook refers to June 1 the following applies: When June 1 falls on a business day, enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business.

If June 1 falls on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, then enrollment forms and other documentation, as required, must be in the extension office by close of business on the next business day. 3.

A rider is considered to have fallen when he or she is separated from the horse that has not fallen, in such a way as to necessitate remounting or vaulting into the saddle.

A horse is considered to have fallen when the shoulder and haunch on the same side have touched the ground or an obstacle and the ground. 4.

Height of horses and ponies is based upon vertical distance from the ground to the top of withers on an unshod basis.

Adjustments should be based on thickness of shoe at heel on front shoes at the time the horse is measured. 5. “Time out”, a period of up to 7 minutes, to be called in the event of a horse casting a shoe or breakage of equipment while in the ring.

No animal shall be permitted more than one such time out per class.

This rule applies in all Saddle Seat and Driving classes only.

Show stewards are responsible for keeping track of time outs. 6.

Whenever this book refers to a Hackamore in the Western performance classes, other than Contest Classes, it means the use only of a flexible, braided rawhide or leather or rope bosal, the core of which may be either rawhide or flexible metal cable.

Absolutely no rigid materials will be permitted under the jaw, regardless of how padded or covered.

This description DOES NOT refer to a so-called mechanical hackamore. 7.

Whenever this book refers to a snaffle bit in Western performance classes, it means the use of a smooth snaffle bit with a broken mouthpiece and no twist (conventional Oring, egg-butt, or D-ring).

An optional loose chin strap may be used (leather or nylon only).

Reins to be attached above the chin strap. 8.

Whenever this book refers to a bit in Western performance classes, it means the use of a curb bit that has a solid or broken mouthpiece, has shanks and acts with leverage. 9.

A turnout is defined as a combination of horse, vehicle, and driver. 10.

Immediate family is defined as: parent, brother, sister, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, grandparents, and bona fide foster parents and/or legal guardians. 83 Good Housekeeping Award A good housekeeping awards program will be held during the State 4-H Horse Show.

Judging will be done on a county basis with a winning county selected in each district daily.

An overall grand champion, reserve champion and third place will be selected for the show from the daily county winners.

Scoring System Stall Card/Emergency Information—25 points – Neat and visible – Includes member’s name – Includes horse’s name – Includes county name – Includes emergency notification information Clean and Tidy Appearance—25 points – Aisle free of hay and tack – Aisle neatly swept – Stalls clean and bedded – Horses clean and well-groomed – Tack stalls neat and clean Hospitality and Overall Presentation—25 points – Atmosphere friendly and welcoming – Overall appearance neat, uniform, and attractive – Rules for decorating followed – Visitors’ questions answered courteously and accurately – Exhibitors/others friendly and interacting cooperatively TOTAL – 75 POSSIBLE POINTS 84 PENNSYLVANIA 4-H YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS A goal of the 4-H Youth Development Program of Penn State Cooperative Extension is to provide opportunities for children and youth to develop character.

Pennsylvania 4-H supports the CHARACTER COUNTS! six pillars of character: TRUSTWORTHINESS, RESPECT, RESPONSIBILITY, FAIRNESS, CARING, and CITIZENSHIP.

In order to assure that the 4-H Youth Development Program of Penn State Cooperative Extension provides positive environments for all individuals to learn and grow, participants agree to abide by these expectations of behavior: I will be trustworthy.

I will be worthy of trust, honor, and confidence.

I will be a model of integrity by doing the right thing even when the cost is high.

I will be honest in all my activities.

I will keep my commitments by attending all sessions of the planned event.

If I am not feeling well or have a schedule conflict, I will inform my chaperone or a person in charge.

I will be in the assigned area (e.

G.

Club meeting room, building, dorm) at all times.

Pennsylvania 4-H does not permit dishonesty by lying, cheating, deception, or omission.

I will be respectful.

I will show respect, courtesy, and consideration to everyone, including myself, other program participants, and those in authority.

I will act and speak respectfully.

I will treat program areas, lodging areas, and transportation vehicles with respect.

I will not use vulgar or abusive language or cause physical harm.

I will appreciate diversity in skill, gender, ethnicity, and ability.

Pennsylvania 4-H does not tolerate statements or acts of discrimination or prejudice.

I will be responsible.

I will be responsible, accountable, and selfdisciplined in the pursuit of excellence.

I will live up to high expectations so I can be proud of my work and conduct.

I will be on time to all program events.

I will be accountable by accepting responsibility for my choices and actions.

I will abide by the established program curfew.

I will be responsible for any damage, theft, or misconduct in which I participate.

I will be fair.

I will be just, fair, and open.

I will participate in events fairly by following the rules, not taking advantage of others, and not asking for special exceptions.

I will be caring.

I will be caring in my relationships with others.

I will be kind and show compassion for others.

I will treat others the way I want to be treated.

I will show appreciation for the efforts of others.

I will help members in my group to have a good experience by striving to include all participants.

I will be a good citizen.

I will be a contributing and law-abiding citizen.

I will be respectful to the environment and contribute to the greater good.

I will not use any illegal substances such as tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. SM CHARACTER COUNTS! Is a service mark of the CHARACTER COUNTS Coalition, a project of the Josephson Institute of Ethics. 85

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